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What are you reading ATM


Dawn
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Are you? I checked Amazon and it only showed it available as a paperback, not kindle book. :(

 

No - just downloaded it for 6 bucks (but I did the search on the Kindle not on the internet)... don't know if it's any good yet (hopefully it's not cheesy, lol) but I'll let you know...

 

M

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Oh be still my heart! I'm downloading, lol.

 

M

 

Okay - I read to what is probably the E-Book equiv of page 10 and stopped reading. It was, to me, every bad cliche of "soft gushy" lesbian sex... it lacked the raw "un-choreographed" earthy smell of true eroticism. Sex isn't poetic and soft. Sex is sweaty, raw, and ungraceful. At least good sex is.

 

M

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Soooo glad to know I'm not the only one who rarely reads less than two books at a time, lol!

 

M

 

You're definitely not the only one lol! I always have several going at once unless one grabs me and I finish it in a night (which happens occasionally).

 

Currently reading:

 

At the Crossroads - by various Scarlet Imprint authors

Freedom is a Two Edged Sword - by Jack Parsons

The Time Machine - by HG Wells

Heart of Darkness - by Joseph Comrad

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Last night I downloaded to Kindle "The Girl With The Glass Feet" by Ali Shaw. I can't put it down. The writing is so evocative you are transported into the book. You see everything he speaks of. It is a very, very deep book and one must see past the surface to understand what is happening, but what a treasure.

 

M

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  • 2 months later...

Im about half way through "Operative Witchcraft" by Nigel Pennick at the moment. I bought this "blind" as i couldnt find any reviews of it so was really expecting a sort of "how to" book in the guise of other such books. However, the first 4 or 5 chapters have been historical and have focussed on particular cunning men and wisewoman which has been extremely interesting. As you would expect from Mr Pennick, there is a focus on East Anglia and the Toadmen and Plough Men and Root Diggers and such like. By the looks of it, he goes into actual practices in the latter chapters. So far it has been very good. I'll list the chapters if that's ok as i couldnt see mention of it elsewhere:

1)Operative Witchcraft: Definitions and Practices

2)Witchcraft, Fortune and Misfortune

3)Power and the Powers of Witchcraft

4)The Gamut of Witchcraft: An Early Fictional Portrayal

5)The British Laws Against Witchcraft

6)Weird Plants, Root Diggers and Witchcraft

7)Spells, Incantations and Charms

8)Amulets and Mascots

9)Binding Magic and the Art of Fascination, or the Evil Eye

10)The Powers of Operative Witchcraft

11)The Power of the Toad

12)Paraphernalia

13)The Power of Magical Places

14)West Indian Obeah and its Common Features With British Witchcraft

Postscript) Operative Witchcraft and the Emergence of Wicca

It's quite a small book but dense with information, (apologies if i should have put this in the review section; wasnt sure).

 

Ive also just about finished "Sarah the Priestess: The First Matriarch of Genesis". Ive got a bit of a "thing" about biblical history and how the Old Testament stories are mostly rehashed and garbled Babylonian/Sumerian mythology. It's been a very interesting read as it lays out some really good evidence for Sarah, Abrams wife, being a high ranking "sibyl"/priestess, possibly of Astarte/Asherah. It strikes me that the priestesses/priests in those far off todays have some similarity to witches especially in the arts they performed. Anyway, a very good read it is.

 

Oh - sounds lovely and I needed a new read (and it was on Kindle for only $2.99, lol). I've downloaded it and look forward to reading it :-)

 

M

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I just purchased this book called Birth Angels by Terah Cox. She is teaching a class in my town on Subday that I wanted to go to, but no longer can go to due to work. But here is the product description from amazon:

Product Description

Birth Angels is one of the first comprehensive presentations in English of the 72 angels of the Tree of Life. Based on the tradition of the Kabbalah, this inspiring guide invites readers to discover the three angels that rule the domain of their birth. The book details the qualities of each angel and provides an inspiring three-step path for invoking and using their energies.According to tradition, at every moment a particular, nameable angelic energy is available for us to appeal to and receive help from. Birth Angels shows us how to use this energy. Easy reference, helpful charts, and a multi-tradition approach will appeal to readers with diverse levels of interest. Birth Angels is designed as a daily path for the intent seeker and as an occasional reference for all who want to engage their personal angelic allies.

About the Author

Terah Cox has studied the Kabbalah for many years and has organized and hosted workshops on the 72 angels for Swiss-Canadian Kabbalist and teacher Christiane Muller. Terah has also been a longtime lyric writer-as Terry Cox-formerly under contract to Columbia Pictures, BMG Music, Warner-Chappell, and other major music publishers. Her television and film credits range from Tri-Star to PopStars to The Conan O'Brien Show. She is author of the acclaimed Writers Digest book You Can Write Song Lyrics. The versatile writer and speaker lives in Cold Spring, NY

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"Pharmako: Poeia" by Dale Pendell. Book one of three on poisonous plants.

 

Nice one. When I first started on this trilogy it took me a bit to get into. His writing style threw me at first, much of it is written as if in a lucid dream, but once I got a feel for it the books opened up. I know I missed a lot the first time around (I bounced around quite a bit too throughout the 3) so now I'm going back and incorporating the pharmako series as a reference in comparison to others. As with most things it's a slow process, but I can't come close to personal comparison regarding Dale's experience with the plethora of plant allies he covers.

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On a month break and the goal is to get through;

 

The Tibetan Book of the Dead

Tantra-The Path of Ecstasy

Tibetan Book of Living and Dying (almost finished with this one)

Tibetan Yogas of Body, Speech, and Mind

Healing with Form, Energy, and Light

The True Grimoire -J. Kent

The Authentic IChing

The White Goddess -Graves (about 1/4 way through)

Crystal Balls and Crystal Bowls

Ozark Folk Magic (almost finished with this one as well)

 

better get started already, that's a hefty goal I realize, but it will keep me busy. :)

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My workplace very kindly said everyone could choose something/s from Amazon up to the value of £ 40 ! So I have finally got myself some craft books worth reading given the reviews on here :)

 

I chose Robin Artissons Witching way of the hollow hill, and a Grimoire for modern cunningfolk by Peter Paddon. There was one other I wanted, Chasing the tides, but it's turned out to be out of stock. So I have one more book left to choose as long as it's under a tenner! Yay! :D

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The Book of Werewolves by Sabine Baring-Gould (1865).

 

In the beginning of the book, the author describes an interaction with local townspeople, who are warning of the dangers of being out at night alone. One of the men tells how he saw the creature through the hedge. The fact that the hedge served to somehow shield the man from danger was literally odd, but symbolically significant, considering that the "elders of the village", claimed that by "tempting Providence" a man gave up the right to ask for help from god. So, if you choose to cross the hedge, do not expect to be saved, if you meet a monster? I have not learned much about werewolves, but it is interesting.

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