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Iron John Servitor and immediate results

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Barnstock

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In consideration of everything I want to accomplish this year, I decided to create a servitor based on Iron John. He is a wild man of the woods with gold and arms at his disposal. I made the physical representation out of clay, in the shape of the head of a bearded man which contains the appropriate herbs, items, and a very large quartz crystal point. I used my own method to bring it to life.

 

I had decided to sell my portable sawmill last year, but the timing didn't feel right, so I waited until after the holidays. This became my new servitor's first task; to quickly find a buyer that would meet my price without haggling. I gave it the command and then posted the ad on craigslist. In about ten minutes, the calls and texts started coming in, and ten minutes after that, I had spoken to the gentleman who would buy the sawmill. Last saturday he picked it up, leaving me with a pocket full of cash, and the promise of a complimentary night for me and a guest at his bed and breakfast.

 

I rewarded the servitor with beer, fruit, and honey.

 

Years of experimentation have taught me a few guidelines for creating these beings and using them successfully.

 

1. It's nature has to resonate with you. It is, in a sense, a reflection of aspects of yourself, and it's important to be concious of that in order to prevent it from taking on any detrimental qualities. This is also why I often choose heroic archetypes to base them on.

 

2. Trust your instincts during it's creation, and while a servitor can be created without a physical form, I find it's best to create something with your hands as well as your mind.

 

3. Each one is unique, and cannot be recreated, and each has a lifespan.

 

4. One task at a time.

 

5. Always command, never ask. As it's creator, you are it's god. It would not exist without you.

 

6. Reward it for its efforts, as a semi-sentient being, it's existence would become unbearable and it would wither and die without getting something for its labor.

 

7. The more you use it, the more powerful it becomes, but in reality, this is your own power.

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Very cool, I apply the same mentality to sigils, although on occasion they can be less likely to be commanded...they just work passively--sometimes at inappropriate times.

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For me, sigils are "locked in" once I create them, not so much an entity but a direct expression of my will. I had to learn to be very careful, and very specific when using them. And as with all workings, I've found that I have to be very honest with myself about what I want, and I use them as a tool of expediency. Sigils are very useful for those little changes that have to be made as situations arise. Servitors are basically a created familiar, and tend to be much more powerful. Essentially, to me, a servitor is a medium to work through that does an end run around all those pesky psychological conditionings that get in the way of a working. A sigil does the same thing, but can't be re-used.

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I re-use sigils all the time ;). I did use something that might be considered a servitor in the past, perhaps I can experiment a bit more

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Oddly enough, I picked up the thing tonight and it broke open, spilling its contents all over the floor. I've only used it for a couple of other tasks, with mediocre results, so I'm wondering if I gave it too much right off the bat. I've decided to neutralize it and try to resurrect it into something new, but I'm not sure how that will go, and may end up destroying it.

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Barnstock, well said. I agree with you on many points, and disagree in some minor points. Your post is very informative. As someone who works almost 100% with self-created familiars, much of what you had said resonates with me greatly, most especially the 'one task at a time'.

 

You may not wish to know what parts I disagree with, but in case you are curious, I will tell you.

 

In my experience throughout the years, I have found it unnecessary and sometimes a hindrance to the dynamic between creation and creator, to command rather than request. This, of course, could just be my own way of doing business (much of which was adopted from ethical leadership classes). In my own experiences, being polite and formal with the servitor, showing it that you respect it as a being, has won me respect. Whereas commanding and trying to prove the being that you are indeed it's creator (something that the creature is unlikely to forget), has won me contempt and frustrations and, ultimately, failures.

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