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La Madama - Patron Spirit for playing card readers and bone casters

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RavenFlyer

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La Madama is not an Orisha or Loa, but she is venerated by many practitioners within african diaspora faiths.

She is the spirit of an old slave conjure woman.

 

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La Madama is the patron of playing card readers and bone readers, the latter a link to her past on the African continent. As a conjure woman, she carries the wisdom of all the old rootworkers from the past. She is the patron of root doctors, and as a spirit guide, she may be called upon by conjure doctors who seek information when faced with difficult clients or intractable jobs of spell-casting. The broom is one of her tools; she works with the broom to sweep out all crossed conditions, family issues, troubles, and confusion that clients may bring to the root doctor. Her assistance is sought by those performing rites of spiritual cleansing for clients, opening their roads, or bringing them total success in all they do. She is also petitioned to bless and settle down troublesome folks, bring money into the house, and help bills get paid on time.

 

Old-fashioned "Aunt Jemima" pancake mix advertising art or "Mammy" style cookie jar figures are images often used to represent La Madama on the altar. Cuban-influenced card readers who work with La Madama may house her in an iron pot, after the manner used when working with orishas, and they will provide her with tools such as a knife to nail down enemies, a pack of playing cards to reveal the client's troubles, a broom for cleansing and to sweep away crossed conditions, some chalk to mark the magical work and lock it down, and a wooden cross to hold her power. The colors associated with La Madama are red or dark orange, white, and black, and these colours, as well as a broom, are also found on Aunt Jemima and Mammy figures. The offerings La Madama accepts are molasses, whiskey, brown sugar, cigarettes, a cool glass of water, and a vigil candle.

(source:http://readersandrootworkers.org/wiki/La_Madama)

 

I have worked with La Madama for a while. She is very helpful, but not always like you would expect. She gives you adivce sometimes with a smack upside the head, and swipe with her broom.

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Are you going to make a La Madama doll? When I first looked at this I thought you'd made the one pictured.. I love your dolls.

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interesting read RF.

 

Sometimes I'm interested in these histories because I have a Honduran linage in my roots and the voodoo stuff sort of appeasls to me too.

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Thanks Exile! I am thinking I may do more posts on the Loa, and other spirits that are worked with within these diaspora.

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I am going to be making a few. (you might get a surprise with your book).

 

 

I literally gasped with excitement when I read that! :)

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I hope you do continue! I love the items I've seen of yours (stempunk rosary is on my wish list) but I'm especially fond (too mild of a word, really) of your dolls. You're very talented and I really look forward to your next installment of Loa lore.

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I plan on continuing. As Mama Lola says "you never know all about da vodou. Not till ya in a grave and wif the spirits."

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