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Grymdycche

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Grymdycche last won the day on September 19 2016

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About Grymdycche

  • Rank
    Thaumaturge Medicocre
  • Birthday 06/26/1962

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  • Website URL
    http://www.phrets.com

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  • Gender
    Canine
  • Twitter
    PHigginbotham
  • Location
    Upper Mid Atlantic, USA
  • Interests
    Occult, Musician, Magic, Astronomy
  • How familiar are you with witchcraft?
    From a studious perspective, very.
    From a personal, practical standpoint, not so much. I am very pressed for privacy, space, and time to be able to carry out rituals or spellwork. I am working on correcting those things but it will take time.

    I am now quite comfortable with what I know and understand of the path, it's history, and it's context. For instance, I realized I don't care for ceremonial or "high" magic because of the Judeo-Christian component prevalent in it. I feel a more pantheistic, natural approach to the world. Not necessarily animistic, though.
  • Have you explored other paths?
    1) Presbyterian, up to 8th grade. Got out as soon as I could.

    2) I took a look at Wicca before I understood the difference, and was confused. The many books I had amassed when I was 13 - 15 made no mention of the "Goddess" or the rede, and suddenly all the newer books I was reading did.
    Once I sorted out that Wicca was a Goddess based religion (that espoused dogma while simultaneously denying it), that utilized only certain aspects of witchcraft and unfairly misappropriated other concepts, I dropped it like a hot cauldron.
  • Have you ever worked with Traditional Witchcraft?
    Slightly, yes. (See first question)
    I am still studying. However, it's a little unnerving to open a door that once opened cannot be closed.
  • What does Traditional Witchcraft mean to you?
    Traditional Witchcraft - to me - refers to the magical Craft as practiced by people such as, but not limited to, the Cunning Folk throughout the ages (sans the Judeo-Christian aspect) - the healers, and wise women/men who (usually)quietly earned the respect - or ire - of their community.
    Folk magic might be another word for or aspect of it. To me, it's using force of will, positive thinking, visualization, and hereto not yet scientifically understood forces of nature to guide one's life and influence circumstances that are more desirable than those merely left to chance.

    They do not engage in the modern religion started of Wicca started by Gerald Gardner, where much of it's rituals were taken from or inspired by Ceremonial Magic and Aleister Crowley.

    It is, or can be, a spiritual path, though I fall short of calling it a religion. There is a connection to, and reverence for, nature. It is a means of connecting to the greater, underlying engine of the universe for self empowerment and harmony.
  • How long have you worked with witchcraft in general?
    On and off, since I was 13 - currently, over 35 years. (eek I'm getting old)
  • What brought you to our site?
    Just searching on the net, I think.
    I saw a blurb describing the difference between wicca and trad craft, and it totally clicked with me.
  • What do you expect to get from this site, and what do you expect to contribute to this forum?
    Knowledge and wisdom, the benefit of those who know, and the chance to share ideas and thoughts.

    I also want to better understand the differences between traditional witchcraft and wicca, since the majority of "witch" sites on the 'net are wicca based. I want to find out more about hedgewitchery, wortcunning, cunningcraft, pellars, and of course, traditional witchcraft.

    I also look forward, as my own knowledge grows, to helping teach others, or at least guide them to find their own answers. There is so much confusion out there, and I hope I can help clear the air where possible with what little I know. I hope never to be presumptuous, though.
  • Do you belong to any other online witchcraft sites?
    A few.

    www.traditionalwitchcraft.net (now defunct)
    www.tradwitch.com
    www.crookedpath.org
    eCauldron.net
    awitchalone (http://sacredways.proboards52.com/index.cgi)
    www.occultforums.org
    pentaclemagazine.org

    I rarely post on any of these, as this site is by far my favorite.
  • What are your strongest points in witchcraft?
    Currently, divination -namely, runes and tarot.
    Also learning astrology.

    Soon to work more on protective magic and bringing some prosperity in, hopefully.
  • What are your weakest points in witchcraft?
    Generally, spell casting, advanced stuff.
  • Additional Information.
    If anyone's curious, my name is pronounced, "Grim-ditch".. it is a surname in my lineage, just not my legal (paternal) one.

    I've been a musician for over 30 years. I started playing piano when I was 11. I basically taught myself, and play by ear. I started on guitar when I was 15, which I consider to be my primary instrument. I also play bass, mandolin, and drums. (Drums are so much fun!)
    I've written several completely tunes, and have hundreds more of bits and riffs and hooks written. When I get to finish my den downstairs (still under construction), I'll have not only a place to practice craft but also a recording studio of sorts.

    I also like Astronomy, and own two telescopes. I've seen some pretty cool stuff!

    I'm also into a specialized field of magic (performing magic) called Bizarre magic - this is closeup magic similar to David Blaine's early work, only with a more occult twist. I believe that Shamans of the past might have utilized some degree of trickery occasionally to enhance the perception of their power and induce more confidence in their abilities, so in reality, what seems contradictory at first glance actually goes hand in hand throughout history.

    I'm also sometimes into ghost hunting. Sometimes. There's a lot of real knuckleheads out there though, and they tend to turn me off from it.

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. Happy BIrthday!🍸🍸🍺

  2. Case in point: did my regular New Years's tarot reading. Final card (Celtic Cross spread) was the Five of Pentacles. That's not a card you want to see for "likely final outcome". Ruined my night. :(
  3. Well, I can't remember the last time I posted here.. I meant to come by yesterday for the solstice but got sidetracked. Anyway, interesting thread. I can understand where they're coming from in this article. I still do a full tarot spread every New Year's Eve, for the new year, and one again around July while on vacation (everyone gathers in the cabin for a reading, even the devout Catholics that are my in-laws! Some of those have been truly scary on-target. As in, sudden death in the family scary.) But as to something like a daily reading, using runes or cards or what have you in the morning, I've think I'm better off anymore if I just don't. More peace of mind that way. If I get a negative looking reading, I'd be like, "Oh that's great, it's gonna be a shit day.. lovely" and my day would be kinda ruined. (I don't believe in sugarcoating unpleasant readings and trying to turn them into unicorn kisses, especially for myself). But sometimes, the day wasn't actually all that bad and I got myself bothered for no good reason. Other days, I had what seemed a good or neutral reading but had a truly horrible day. But mostly, on any given day you never know exactly what's going to get thrown at you exactly when or how (at least on a small time scale), so I've decided to just roll with it, insofar as a daily basis goes, and leave my divination for special occasions. After all, there's only so much you can do with limited warning; you always have more control over how you handle a situation (i.e., yourself) than you have over the situation itself, or at least, that's my experience. (Though sometimes, I must admit I seem to have no control over either! )
  4. If you're referring to "The Field" by Lynne McTaggart, it's not a witchcraft or even an occult book, per se, it fits more into the parapsychology/new age genre. Which is fine, just so long as you know that. I've got it, and it's okay, (I don't like the section on homeopathy personally) but I think the best book along those lines is, "The Science of the Craft" by William Keith. It's a really good read if you're an inquisitive type who enjoys scientific conjecture as to how magic works.
  5. She has my vote .. :thumbsup: Now, can I sneak into the inner circle? I hear they don't let anyone in there anymore.. or at least, not the general public.
  6. ROFL!! If the 10 million number isn't ridiculous enough (though the actual 40,000 - 100,000 is still beyond tragic), referring to the victims as wiccan is hilarious. Ain't revisionist history grand! This ties in rather nicely I think to the current thread here on healthy skepticism - always have a little.
  7. I never went for $ilver Raisinwolf book, I'm glad to say, but I've got two that are no better. "Pop Goes the Witch" by Fiorna Horne (it was a bargain book buy.. you know, in the bargain section); and when I was 12 or 13, I bought "The Magic Power of Witchcraft" by Gavin and Yvonne Frost. It's got a truly corny cover with spooky lettering and everything! Though I'm surprised to see a ton of positive reviews for it on Amazon.
  8. Currently I'm reading Wyrdworking - the Path of a Saxon Sorcerer, by Alaric Albertsson. I'll probably do a review on this later, when I'm done, but so far, a few chapters in.. I think I just may have found my niche! I've already read his "Travels through Middle Earth" which was pretty good. It discussed Anglo Saxon lore, Wyrd, and so forth. This book however deals directly with the magic - wortcunning, galdor, and leechcraft, but more over has a very heavy emphasis on the runes (yay); in this case, however, the Futhorc, not the Futhark, which is quite interesting. You know how it is when you really resonate with an author's viewpoint? How nearly everything they write seems uncommonly insightful and honest to you?.. that's this book, for me.
  9. Having been into ghost hunting in the past, I've checked out about every such show there is. I don't watch any of them anymore. The following may make me sound like an opinionated a-hole, but hey, you asked. ;) Honestly, Ghost Adventures makes me feel like my IQ has dropped 50 points after I watch it. :wacko: The frat boy yelling and drama-queening annoys me beyond tolerance, and I've seen some incredibly brazen stunts on there. Not from the main guys themselves, to their credit, but some guest ghost hunting dude they had on once, he threw his EMF meter and claimed it was "knocked out of his hand".. on the slo mo playback, you can plainly see him wind his arm back and throw the thing! What a liar. Anyway, from other comments on ghosthunting forums I belong to, it seems the majority of the show's fans are female and watch primarily because Zak is a hunk. Well, I can't fault women for that, I watch terrible shows that have hot ladies in 'em. (see my last sentence!) ;) Ghost Lab was hilarious; those two machismo hicks cracked me up, trying to intimate and boss around ghosts! Woo, tough guys. How do you give a ghost a wedgie? Paranormal State makes me yak. If I recall correctly, they've been caught outright faking stuff, but they definitely exploit some of their patrons. There was an interview with one of the people whose home they "investigated", the PS team treated the whole thing like a PR stunt. Ryan is a narcissist douchebag. And nearly half their hauntings somehow turn out to be demonic possessions requiring an exorcism. It's like a thinly veiled advertisement for Catholicism. And then Chip Coffey went to exploit kids in his psychic children series, for which there are many complaints and charges. Most Haunted: what can anyone say? They have definitely been caught faking effects, numerous times. Laughing stock of the whole genre. Entertaining though, I guess? Sad to say, but the original Ghost Hunters is (IMO) still the "best", but really, if you've seen 3 shows, I feel like you've seen 'em all. And I'm convinced Grant has faked things too, there are lots of examples on Youtube. Of course that doesn't mean everything is fake, but how do you know now which is which? It destroyed their credibility. If I catch an ep anymore, it's only because I think Kris Williams is a hottie. ;)
  10. Yay, another person who's not hellbent on hops! So very often I see beer advertised on it's hops content, like it's all about the hops. Hops are freakin' bitter, I prefer a heavier, sweeter malt content myself, and just a touch of hops.
  11. lol.. though I can't quite make out what the picture is for the "what I tell my family I do" ..
  12. That's an awesome book, Michele. It goes so deep you could spend years delving into it. .. Having just created a Llwewllyn account yesterday (their 2012 astrological calendar is dirt cheap there), I was poking around in their decks, and I thought the Steampunk deck actually looked pretty cool, for what might be considered a novelty deck.
  13. Ah, Beowulf, love it. I think I agree with anjeaunot on the origin though; it's an archetypical, classic tale of good overcoming evil, probably as old as mankind itself. Mead halls such as Hrothgar's were probably not rarities in successful nordic kingdoms, and Grendel is ..well, your typical evil personified. Plus there's his mother, and finally, the dragon. What Beowulf does have that is uniquely Anglo-Saxon/Nordic in nature is the way in which the warrior class is exalted, honored, boastful and unapologetic, even over-the-top, and love/romance elements kept to a minimum. These guys were the original Klingons. The bodies at Sutton Hoo that were scattered about are believed to have been executions.. there may have been a gallows at mound #5 even. I totally agree with you CG in your last paragraph. Most scholars believe Beowulf originated during the pre-christian Anglo-Saxon era, and was altered later. I would looooove to read the original.. if it were ever actually written, which I doubt. It was probably an oral tradition in its pure pagan form. It doesn't appear that runes were ever used for lengthy bits of writing, increasing use of the Latin alphabet was part and parcel with the advent of christianity there.
  14. " ...oh dear, the toner must have smudged again .."
  15. The original was made in 1973, and starred Christopher Lee :thumbsup: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070917/ The remake came out in 2006, and starred Nicolas Cage...'nuff said! :vomit: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0450345/
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