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Magickal Uses of Woods


Magickal Uses of Woods

Taken from the ancient Celtic tree alphabet.

Individual trees of particular species have been revered, the kind varying with the divine force represented. The symbolism of the woods are very important in the construction of any magical tool.



OAK
The oak tree is the tree of Zeus, Jupiter, Hercules, The Dagda (The Chief of the Elder Irish gods), Thor and all other Thunder Gods.
The royalty of the Oak needs no enlarging upon.
The Oak is the tree of endurance and triumph, and like the Ash, is said to count the lightning's' flash.
The Oak is a male wood which is ideal for the construction of any tool that needs the male influence such as Athames, certain wands and staffs.
The midsummer fire is always Oak and the need fire is always kindled in an Oak log.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Endurance, triumph, strength, power, dominion, prosperity, sacrifice, guardian, liberator.

BIRCH
With the exception of the mysterious elder, the Birch is the earliest of the forest trees.
The Birch is used extensively in cleansing rituals.
Throughout Europe, Birch twigs are used to expel evil spirits.
Birch rods are also used in rustic rituals to drive out the spirits of the old year.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Controlled by the Lunar influences. Birth, healing, Lunar workings, and protection.

HAZEL
The Hazel is a tree of wisdom.
In England, all the knowledge of the arts and sciences were bound to the eating of Hazel nuts.
Until the seventeenth century, a forked Hazelstick was used to divine the guilt of persons in cases of murder and theft.
We have retained the practice of divining for water and buried treasure.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Wisdom, intelligence, inspiration, wrath.

ALDER
The Alder is the tree of fire.
In the battle of the trees, the Alder fought in the very front line.
It is described as the very "battle witch" of all woods, the tree that is hottest in the fight.
From the alder, you can make three different dyes, red from its bark, green from its flowers, and brown from its twigs; this symbolizes the elements of fire, water and earth.
The Alder wood is the wood of the witches.
Whistles may be made of this wood to summon and control the four winds.
It is also the ideal wood for making the magical pipes and flutes.
To prepare the wood for use, beat the bark away with a willow stick while projecting your wishes into it.
The Alder is a token of resurrection.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Controlling the four winds, banishing and controlling elementals, resurrection. Making magical dyes.

IVY / VINE
The Ivy was sacred to Osiris as well as to Dionysus.
Vine and Ivy come next to each other at the turn of the year, and are jointly dedicated to resurrection.
Presumably, this is because they are the only two trees that grow spirally.
The Vine also symbolizes resurrection because its strength is preserved in the wine.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: (VINE) Faerie work, Joy, Exhilaration, Wrath, Rebirth. (IVY) Fidelity, Constancy, Love, Intoxication.

YEW
The Yew is known as the death tree in all european countries.
Sacred to Hecate in Greece and Italy.
Yew wood makes excellent bows, as the Romans learned from the Greeks.
This strengthened the belief that Yew was connected with death.
Its use in England is recalled in Macbeth where Hecate's cauldron contained:"... Slips of Yew, slivered in the moon eclipse."
The Silver Fir of birth and the Yew of death are sisters.
They stand next to each other in the circle of the year and their foliage is almost identical.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Destructive workings concerning death. Not recommended for magical tools "...for I am the tomb to every hope."

ROWAN
The Rowan is seen as the tree of life.
It is also known as Mountain Ash, Quickbeam, The Witch or Witch Wand.
In the British Isles, Rowan is used as a protection against lightning and magical charms of all sorts.
In ancient Ireland, the Druids of opposing forces would kindle a fire of rowan and say an incantation over it to summon spirits to take part in the battle.
The Rowan is also used for many healing purposes.
The "Quickbeam" is the tree of quickening.
Another use was in metal divining.
In Ireland, a Rowan stake was hammered through a corpse to immobilize the spirit.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Divination, healing, astral work, protection.

ASH
The Ash is sacred to Poseidon and Woden.
The Ash is considered to be the father of trees.
The Ash is the tree of sea power, or of the power resident in water. Special guardian spirits reside in the Ash; This makes it excellent for absorbing sickness.
The spirally carved druidical wand was made of Ash for this purpose.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Sea power, karmic laws, magical potency, healing, protection from drowning.

PINE
External symbol of life and immortality.
It is one of the few trees that are androgynous.
It was also worshiped by the ancients as a symbol of fire because of its resemblance to a spiral of flame.
It is regarded as a very soothing tree to be near.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Strength, life and immortality, rejuvenation

WILLOW
The Willow was sacred to Hecate, Circe, Hera, and Persephone, all death aspects of the Triple Moon Goddess, and was often used by the Witches in Greece.
The moon owns it.
Female symbol.
It is the tree that loves water most and is sacred to the Moon Goddess who is the giver of dew and moisture, generally.
The Willow is the tree of enchantment.
Can be made into a tool to make wishes come true.
MAGICKAL PURPOSES: Moon magic, psychic energy, healing, inspiration, and fertility

ELDER
A waterside tree, the Elder has white flowers that bloom to their peak in midsummer (as is also true for the Rowan) thus making the Elder another aspect of the White Goddess.
The Elder is also said to be the crucifixion tree.
The inner bark and the flowers have long been famous for their therapeutic qualities.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Witchcraft, banishment, magical art, waters of life.

HAWTHORN
The Whitethorn or Hawthorn or May Witch takes its name from the May.
It is a generally unlucky tree and its name, translated from the Irish Brehon Laws, had the meaning "harm".
The Goddess, under the name Cardea, cast spells with the Hawthorn.
In many cultures, the month of the Hawthorn (May) is a month of bad luck for marriages.
The Hawthorn blossom, for many men, has the strong scent of female sexuality and was used by the Turks as an erotic symbol.
The monks of Glastonbury perpetuated it and sanctified it with an approving tale that the staff of Joseph and the Crown of thorns were made of Hawthorn.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Purification, enforced chastity, male potency, and cleansing.

HOLLY
Holly means "holy".
The identification of the pacific Christ with the Holly is poetically inept as it is the Oak king, not the Holly king that is crucified on a T shaped cross.
The Holly has many uses from making a dye from its berries to being used as an aphrodisiac.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Holiness, consecration, material gain, physical revenge, beauty

WHITE POPLAR
The tree of the Autumn Equinox and of old age, is the shifting leaved
White Poplar, or Aspen, The shield makers tree.
Heracles bound his head in triumph with popular after killing the giant Cacus (the evil one).
The Black poplar was a funeral tree sacred to the Mother Earth.
Plato makes a reference to the use of Black popular and Silver Fir as an aid in divination.
The Silver Fir standing for hope assured and the Black Poplar for loss of hope.
In ancient Ireland, the coffin makers measuring rod was made of Aspen, apparently to remind the dead that this was not the end.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Hope, rebirth, divinations.

ALMOND
Almond has a very sweet natural being. Aids in self protection.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Fruitfulness, virginity

APPLE
It is an old English custom to drink to the health of the
Apple tree with a good glass of cider all in hopes of encouraging the tree to produce a good crop next year.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Fertility

COCONUT
The Coconut is feminine and very fertile.
The shell represents the womb, and the milk, fertility.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Protection from negative psychic forces.

FIG
The Fig is androgynous. The fruit representing the feminine and the triple lobed leaves suggest the masculine force.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Balance

MISTLETOE
The mistletoe was sacred to the Druids and to the Norse.
It was considered to be the great healer and has both male and female qualities.
It was so well regarded by the Norse (because it was sacred to Freya) that they refused to fight in the vicinity of Mistletoe.
The custom of hanging Mistletoe in the house to promote peace comes from this. Generally regarded today as a symbol of love and purity.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Love, fertility, sexual potency.

PALM
Is regarded as particularly powerful because of its incredible durability and because it is self renewing, never changing its leaves. Aids in rejuvenation.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Resurrection, and the cycle and matrix of life

PEACH
The Peach is an emblem of marriage.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Abundance, fruitfulness, happiness.


79 Comments

Does anyone know anything about the Hornbeam tree and its wood? I've asked all over the place. I have a beautiful, enormous Hornbeam tree just outside my front door and two branches were recently thrown off in a storm and landed across my door. I'm sure they were given to me for a reason. All I know is that it's very hard wood with a pearly-white inner grain.
I'll probably decorate the 'walking stick-size' piece. The other branch is perfect 'staff' length. I wondered if anyone knows of magical uses/properties for Hornbeam - or perhaps it's known by another name elsewhere...
Please ignore spelling/missing letters: I've got false nails on.


Hy Absinthe
I just checked to see what is the translation fot Hornbeam tree ( we call it Carpen ). Around here Hornbeam tree has a nafast reputation .It is considered a masculine tree (and that I know because at certain spells where you have to gather 9 branches, in case of a man you have to get it from Carpen, Oak or Beech).When there is a storm you must never seek shelter under this tree - St. Ilie (he is a at it's origins a powerful Tracic lightning and rain deity that the Orthodox Church dressed in christian gown in order to keep - sorcerers remember it's true nature, being described as a left one legged and one armed slightly demonic like creature, whose limbs were thorn off by God for fear of ending creation with his fearful blows that bring lightning, storms and devastation, and spells are recited to him in order to bring powerful storms, he is celebrated by the orthodox church on 20 July ) sends his lightning to nail down demons that are hiding in this tree.There is a saying around that goes "A Carpen always awaits for his hanged man"(someone to hang himself by its branches).It is used in dark magic because it's dark powers - I remember that an old witch told me a story since she was a little girl she and a few other kids were in the woods and had to watch over the cattle, along with another old lady from the village.At night around the fire the boys started to make fun of the old women and she told them to settle down or she will put them in their places, but of course they did not listen.She then went to a Hornbeam tree nearby, took a branch and started to hit the water of a big marsh puddle chanting while the kids laughed around the fire and called her names - she said a meter tall toad like creature that walked on two legs came out of teh water and making horrible sound started to chase the kids.They ran in the deep of the woods, but the lady that was telling the story tripped over a wood and hurt her leg with a big wound that was gushing with blood.The toad like creature, caught her from behind but passed her over and continued going after the boys.The boys managed to run to the village and escaped.From that day on , no one laughed at the old lady anymore.At the end of the story she showed me her scar on the leg.
I use smoke of Hornbeam tree, because oddly enough the smell of burning Hornbeam tree makes all aerial demons run away in fear.
Also, a very old ritual and also liturgical instrument , "toaca" is was made traditional from the wood of this tree and it was used even around households - though today they are very few people who still use it, remaining only to be used in monasteries - in order to invoke rain by certain rhythms and cast away evil spirits from the settlements (this is the origin of "knock three times on wood").They say that in times of draft if someone steals the toaca board from the local church and dips it into a river/well, rain will start - when rain is no longer needed they pull it out of the water. http://www.youtube.c...feature=related or http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
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Oh now, this is not the time to be shy ! Pick a tree that you know personally of it's lore and properties, and post about it. Personally, I would like to see more about the Yew tree, it is a tree that interests me as of late. " Start out on the wrong foot "... dear ? You couldn't start out on the wrong foot here, tut tut on that thought. We are all Seekers, if you have wisdom in this area, please don't deprive me of getting to know you.:wink:
Regards,
Gypsy
Edited : Also, if memory serves me right, one of our Peers ( Absinthe ) was wondering about the Hornbeam or Hornbeen tree. We'd both be so pleased if you had knowledge you could share. Thank you Unagal.


I know very little about Yew tree unfortunately, because it grows only in the upper mountain regions.I know is very feared by shepherds because the lambs tend to eat it and die because of it's poison.I heard that some people used its in the past, taking a stick of such tree and smear in it with the gall balder of a hare and then hanged at their ankle to make them run very fast, but I don't know if it works.There is a spell that uses this tree to haunt the dreams of a lover that left you in order to bring him/her back- but you probably know that one.I could inform myself better for you
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CelticGypsy
Jul 26 2011 12:38 PM
Hello Unagal,

You have been most generous with your information regarding trees and their lore. I will vote up your thread, as I find the information you gave, most interesting. Thank you very much.

Regards,
Gypsy
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Unagal,

I too have voted up your post, there is great value to listening to ones from other paths particularly paths with so much lore and history as yours.

I have a question regarding Willow: I made my staffstang and wand/rod from the branch of a Willow tree I had growing in my old garden. I tended to this tree for several years, then one day I was "called" to the tree and was given the impulse to remove a branch for the use thereof. Shortly after this the tree went into decline and died. By your understanding of trees, was this episode one that I should continue to feel greatful for for or was I the bane of the tree?

FFFF
Elf
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Elfyd,

The willows in my area tend to grow close to water. Your area suffers times of drought from what you have said. Could the timing of your stang retrieval have negatively impacted the tree?
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Elfyd,

The willows in my area tend to grow close to water. Your area suffers times of drought from what you have said. Could the timing of your stang retrieval have negatively impacted the tree?


Well, The tree itself was uprooted from a lake as a sapling, I placed it next to a dried-up(dammed by the City years prior to) water-course and it received plenty of water there over the years even when we had arid spells the willow thrived and grew. At the time of the "calling" it was healthy and well watered. I would never have taken that branch (which was obtuse to the rest of the tree) under any circumstances if it had not told me to.

FFFF
Elf
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Unagal,

I too have voted up your post, there is great value to listening to ones from other paths particularly paths with so much lore and history as yours.

I have a question regarding Willow: I made my staffstang and wand/rod from the branch of a Willow tree I had growing in my old garden. I tended to this tree for several years, then one day I was "called" to the tree and was given the impulse to remove a branch for the use thereof. Shortly after this the tree went into decline and died. By your understanding of trees, was this episode one that I should continue to feel greatful for for or was I the bane of the tree?

FFFF
Elf


I can not honestly say I know the answer.I try not to be superstitious about it, but that is not normal - if there is one tree that is renowned for it's desperate clinging to life it is the willow tree. I myself as a boy broke many branches to play with and then threw them in the fields on the ground - they sprouted and a new bush of a future tree was born - they just clang to the ground and sprouted from one simple stick roots as well as buds that started to lift up - (it seemed amazing to me at that time).They say that willow trees are very prolific trees (they grow at a very fast rate comparing to other trees), and when they are old and thick trees they tend to be sensitive - if you complain about their placement and about them shadowing a too much portion of the ground, or just that they stand in your way, they tend to get sad, start to whiter and die - they are the most sensitive in respect of emotions of all trees I know, checked fact.
It is the purpose of any wand/staff that they bring connection with the Earth and with other respecting elemental.If your connection agent is dead, in my opinion you should abandon the instrument - only when a magical agent is to be entirely sacrificed (cutting up the whole tree for a purpose) than that sacrifice should not be in vain.There is also a spell whit 3 feathers plucked from under the right wing of a live hawk , some spells are recited over it and it serves to keep you immune and safe from dangers, and then you release the hawk back to its life - the charm stops working when the hawk dies, so you have to keep an eye on the bird in order not to rely on vain remedies.I can't really say that your willow died of grief or just passed it's entire power ( willingly /or not )through this magical act - it was no simple act of cutting , it was done with a magical mind set/intention that could have drained its energy.I know that using such a part of a tree requires a certain set of rituals and spells when picked up, at the moment of the sunrise when you take it on a Sunday - one spell that has to be recited when you do this act I can tell:
"Bun gasit, frate (....)
In pamant te-ai implantat
In lumina te-ai scaldat
Vanturi-le te-au infruntat
Pana cand te-ai inaltat
Ai crescut mandru sub soare
Cu curaj si cu rabdare
Eu sunt tu, si tu esti eu
Si la bine si la greu
Iarta-ma si pasuieste
Ca te vatam si te rup
Bucata din al tau trup
Nu te rup sa-ti fac durere
Ci te rup sa-mi dai putere
legata-te de mine
Ca vaca de vitel
Ca oaia de miel
Ca apa de sare
Ca Luna de Soare
Cum am zis si cum am facut
Asa sa se-ntample si asa sa fie
Implineste-mi vorba pe deplin
Fiat.Fiat.Fiat.Amin.Amin.Amin.

A very rough translation of the above is:

"Greetings, brother (name of the tree)
In the ground you rooted yourself
In the light you have bathed
Until you tall have risen
You have grown big under the sun
With patience and courage
I am you , and you are I
For better or for worse
Forgive me and do allow
Because I hurt you and rip/break you
Piece from your body
I don't rip to hurt you
But I I rip you to give me power
Tie[connect] yourself to me
Like a cow to her calf
Like a sheep to her lamb
Like water to salt
Like the Moon to the Sun
As I said and as I have done
So shall it happen,So shall it be
Fulfill my word entirely
Fiat.Fiat.Fiat.Amin.Amin.Amin

Then you tend to the wound with earth mixed with pure bee wax and dress it.Then you leave under a tree a piece/loaf of fresh bread with some salt, some milk and a coin, in new pots preferably or directly on the ground.

My advise is not to use the staff for the moment being.See first what is the condition of your willow tree and water it (it likes water).If it does not recover take back the branch .I am sorry about your willow.These are just some suggestions.I hope I was helpful.
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Wyldwood Garden
Dec 12 2011 04:12 AM
Has anyone come across the correspondences of the Australian trees, as I used to have a list but alas the ether has eaten it.
WG
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In Kongo witchcraft we use a staple of 121 varieties of tree sticks, not to mention about 200 varieties of tree leaves. The sticks are used to make powders to aid in spell work, as part of cauldrons that contain spirits. as ritual cleansing aids, and even for exorcism rituals, to name a few things. In the Afro-Caribbean traditions of Palo Mayombe, Makaya, and Obeah, sticks are used extensively. It is becoming more common practice to integrate trees in North America as well, since these traditions are becoming more prevalent in the US. In our tradition the coconut spirit is called Obi. It is a special kind of spirit that can help us communicate with the dead. Disks are made of the coconut shells. The disks and the divination practice with them is called Chamalongo, which is a Kikongo word meaning cemetery. The divination is done with a spirit fetish that is made of a particular wood with sticks around it that modify its energy frequency. Certain sticks are also used as medicine. Tree resin, such as dragon's blood, copal, etc.. are used in ritual, medicines, and as components in making spirit fetishes. We even place certain spell items under the roots and in the branches of trees. Thanks for sharing Tana.

-- Blacksmith
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CelticGypsy
Dec 12 2011 03:02 PM

In Kongo witchcraft we use a staple of 121 varieties of tree sticks, not to mention about 200 varieties of tree leaves. The sticks are used to make powders to aid in spell work, as part of cauldrons that contain spirits. as ritual cleansing aids, and even for exorcism rituals, to name a few things. In the Afro-Caribbean traditions of Palo Mayombe, Makaya, and Obeah, sticks are used extensively. It is becoming more common practice to integrate trees in North America as well, since these traditions are becoming more prevalent in the US. In our tradition the coconut spirit is called Obi. It is a special kind of spirit that can help us communicate with the dead. Disks are made of the coconut shells. The disks and the divination practice with them is called Chamalongo, which is a Kikongo word meaning cemetery. The divination is done with a spirit fetish that is made of a particular wood with sticks around it that modify its energy frequency. Certain sticks are also used as medicine. Tree resin, such as dragon's blood, copal, etc.. are used in ritual, medicines, and as components in making spirit fetishes. We even place certain spell items under the roots and in the branches of trees. Thanks for sharing Tana.

-- Blacksmith


Blacksmith, you always graciously bring something usable to anyone on their respected path. Thank you for bumping this up. Much food for thought. I too appreciate the Original Post, and Tana sharing it with us. It would be a hard thing to find a coconut tree up here in Osage, but it's offered that other trees in my little piece of the earth, can share their knowledge and what they are in their beings, born to do.

Regards,
Gypsy
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JuniperBaby
Dec 14 2011 01:22 PM

the sorcerers here bury things at the roots of such trees



I've recently had lots of urges to bury things in the roots of trees. I was choosing the tree by...I'm not sure what. I guess just by intuition and my past relationship with it. I hadn't thought to seriously use tree correspondences when burying things. I was so busy thinking whether I should release it into the river or ocean or earth, that I wasn't able to make the jump to picking the tree with more intent and research.

I've more and more, been looking to use nature in it's own environment, rather than bringing it home, to do my work.

Thank you Wyldwood Garden for resurrecting this thread.

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I buried a baby hedgehog under our plum tree after it didn't make it thought the night - felt like the right thing to do.
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Thank you so much for this :happydance: . It` just what I need for my learning at this time.

xx
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Magickal Uses of Woods

Taken from the ancient Celtic tree alphabet.

Individual trees of particular species have been revered, the kind varying with the divine force represented. The symbolism of the woods are very important in the construction of any magical tool.



<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>OAK</span></strong>
The oak tree is the tree of Zeus, Jupiter, Hercules, The Dagda (The Chief of the Elder Irish gods), Thor and all other Thunder Gods.
The royalty of the Oak needs no enlarging upon.
The Oak is the tree of endurance and triumph, and like the Ash, is said to count the lightning's' flash.
The Oak is a male wood which is ideal for the construction of any tool that needs the male influence such as Athames, certain wands and staffs.
The midsummer fire is always Oak and the need fire is always kindled in an Oak log.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Endurance, triumph, strength, power, dominion, prosperity, sacrifice, guardian, liberator.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>BIRCH</span></strong>
With the exception of the mysterious elder, the Birch is the earliest of the forest trees.
The Birch is used extensively in cleansing rituals.
Throughout Europe, Birch twigs are used to expel evil spirits.
Birch rods are also used in rustic rituals to drive out the spirits of the old year.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Controlled by the Lunar influences. Birth, healing, Lunar workings, and protection.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>HAZEL</span></strong>
The Hazel is a tree of wisdom.
In England, all the knowledge of the arts and sciences were bound to the eating of Hazel nuts.
Until the seventeenth century, a forked Hazelstick was used to divine the guilt of persons in cases of murder and theft.
We have retained the practice of divining for water and buried treasure.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Wisdom, intelligence, inspiration, wrath.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>ALDER</span></strong>
The Alder is the tree of fire.
In the battle of the trees, the Alder fought in the very front line.
It is described as the very "battle witch" of all woods, the tree that is hottest in the fight.
From the alder, you can make three different dyes, red from its bark, green from its flowers, and brown from its twigs; this symbolizes the elements of fire, water and earth.
The Alder wood is the wood of the witches.
Whistles may be made of this wood to summon and control the four winds.
It is also the ideal wood for making the magical pipes and flutes.
To prepare the wood for use, beat the bark away with a willow stick while projecting your wishes into it.
The Alder is a token of resurrection.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Controlling the four winds, banishing and controlling elementals, resurrection. Making magical dyes.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>IVY / VINE</span></strong>
The Ivy was sacred to Osiris as well as to Dionysus.
Vine and Ivy come next to each other at the turn of the year, and are jointly dedicated to resurrection.
Presumably, this is because they are the only two trees that grow spirally.
The Vine also symbolizes resurrection because its strength is preserved in the wine.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: (VINE) Faerie work, Joy, Exhilaration, Wrath, Rebirth. (IVY) Fidelity, Constancy, Love, Intoxication.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>YEW </span></strong>
The Yew is known as the death tree in all european countries.
Sacred to Hecate in Greece and Italy.
Yew wood makes excellent bows, as the Romans learned from the Greeks.
This strengthened the belief that Yew was connected with death.
Its use in England is recalled in Macbeth where Hecate's cauldron contained:"... Slips of Yew, slivered in the moon eclipse."
The Silver Fir of birth and the Yew of death are sisters.
They stand next to each other in the circle of the year and their foliage is almost identical.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Destructive workings concerning death. Not recommended for magical tools "...for I am the tomb to every hope."

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>ROWAN</span></strong>
The Rowan is seen as the tree of life.
It is also known as Mountain Ash, Quickbeam, The Witch or Witch Wand.
In the British Isles, Rowan is used as a protection against lightning and magical charms of all sorts.
In ancient Ireland, the Druids of opposing forces would kindle a fire of rowan and say an incantation over it to summon spirits to take part in the battle.
The Rowan is also used for many healing purposes.
The "Quickbeam" is the tree of quickening.
Another use was in metal divining.
In Ireland, a Rowan stake was hammered through a corpse to immobilize the spirit.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Divination, healing, astral work, protection.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>ASH</span></strong>
The Ash is sacred to Poseidon and Woden.
The Ash is considered to be the father of trees.
The Ash is the tree of sea power, or of the power resident in water. Special guardian spirits reside in the Ash; This makes it excellent for absorbing sickness.
The spirally carved druidical wand was made of Ash for this purpose.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Sea power, karmic laws, magical potency, healing, protection from drowning.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>PINE</span></strong>
External symbol of life and immortality.
It is one of the few trees that are androgynous.
It was also worshiped by the ancients as a symbol of fire because of its resemblance to a spiral of flame.
It is regarded as a very soothing tree to be near.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Strength, life and immortality, rejuvenation

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>WILLOW</span></strong>
The Willow was sacred to Hecate, Circe, Hera, and Persephone, all death aspects of the Triple Moon Goddess, and was often used by the Witches in Greece.
The moon owns it.
Female symbol.
It is the tree that loves water most and is sacred to the Moon Goddess who is the giver of dew and moisture, generally.
The Willow is the tree of enchantment.
Can be made into a tool to make wishes come true.
MAGICKAL PURPOSES: Moon magic, psychic energy, healing, inspiration, and fertility

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>ELDER</span></strong>
A waterside tree, the Elder has white flowers that bloom to their peak in midsummer (as is also true for the Rowan) thus making the Elder another aspect of the White Goddess.
The Elder is also said to be the crucifixion tree.
The inner bark and the flowers have long been famous for their therapeutic qualities.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Witchcraft, banishment, magical art, waters of life.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>HAWTHORN</span></strong>
The Whitethorn or Hawthorn or May Witch takes its name from the May.
It is a generally unlucky tree and its name, translated from the Irish Brehon Laws, had the meaning "harm".
The Goddess, under the name Cardea, cast spells with the Hawthorn.
In many cultures, the month of the Hawthorn (May) is a month of bad luck for marriages.
The Hawthorn blossom, for many men, has the strong scent of female sexuality and was used by the Turks as an erotic symbol.
The monks of Glastonbury perpetuated it and sanctified it with an approving tale that the staff of Joseph and the Crown of thorns were made of Hawthorn.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Purification, enforced chastity, male potency, and cleansing.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>HOLLY</span></strong>
Holly means "holy".
The identification of the pacific Christ with the Holly is poetically inept as it is the Oak king, not the Holly king that is crucified on a T shaped cross.
The Holly has many uses from making a dye from its berries to being used as an aphrodisiac.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Holiness, consecration, material gain, physical revenge, beauty

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>WHITE POPLAR</span></strong>
The tree of the Autumn Equinox and of old age, is the shifting leaved
White Poplar, or Aspen, The shield makers tree.
Heracles bound his head in triumph with popular after killing the giant Cacus (the evil one).
The Black poplar was a funeral tree sacred to the Mother Earth.
Plato makes a reference to the use of Black popular and Silver Fir as an aid in divination.
The Silver Fir standing for hope assured and the Black Poplar for loss of hope.
In ancient Ireland, the coffin makers measuring rod was made of Aspen, apparently to remind the dead that this was not the end.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Hope, rebirth, divinations.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>ALMOND</span></strong>
Almond has a very sweet natural being. Aids in self protection.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Fruitfulness, virginity

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>APPLE</span></strong>
It is an old English custom to drink to the health of the
Apple tree with a good glass of cider all in hopes of encouraging the tree to produce a good crop next year.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Fertility

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>COCONUT</span></strong>
The Coconut is feminine and very fertile.
The shell represents the womb, and the milk, fertility.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Protection from negative psychic forces.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>FIG</span></strong>
The Fig is androgynous. The fruit representing the feminine and the triple lobed leaves suggest the masculine force.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Balance

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>MISTLETOE</span></strong>
The mistletoe was sacred to the Druids and to the Norse.
It was considered to be the great healer and has both male and female qualities.
It was so well regarded by the Norse (because it was sacred to Freya) that they refused to fight in the vicinity of Mistletoe.
The custom of hanging Mistletoe in the house to promote peace comes from this. Generally regarded today as a symbol of love and purity.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Love, fertility, sexual potency.

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>PALM</span></strong>
Is regarded as particularly powerful because of its incredible durability and because it is self renewing, never changing its leaves. Aids in rejuvenation.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Resurrection, and the cycle and matrix of life

<strong class='bbc'><span class='bbc_underline'>PEACH</span></strong>
The Peach is an emblem of marriage.
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: Abundance, fruitfulness, happiness.

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Love this Tana. Many of the trees mentioned are not easily found here (if at all) but my personal favourites still remain rowan, hazel, holly and hawthorn, all of which I have in my garden.

Hope all the oldies (:)) are doing ok, and hello to the newbies I don't know xx
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I have been dreaming a lot about my black mullberry tree, iam very attached to it but to start dreaming about it !! Oh well all shall be revealed no doubt.
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Still the blackthorn for me.
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Still the blackthorn for me.


Marshy! Haven't seen you in a long time! So glad to see you. :)
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It is a lovely wood indeed,I make my pins of slumber from this bush,or needles of quite.
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westofthemoon
Feb 18 2013 05:51 AM
Still enjoying this thread, especially when I think about the trees I want to plant around my property. We have a lovely triple birch (three birches grown together) that we plan to make a part of our deck. My favorite trees here are the diamond willow, the alder and the rowan, and someday I'll have a juniper and an elder-- just have to find a small one to transplant.
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Still enjoying this thread, especially when I think about the trees I want to plant around my property. We have a lovely triple birch (three birches grown together) that we plan to make a part of our deck. My favorite trees here are the diamond willow, the alder and the rowan, and someday I'll have a juniper and an elder-- just have to find a small one to transplant.


If you're looking for a small Elder, just take a 5 or 6 inch cutting from an existing tree - take part where the stem is still green. - stick it in some rooting compound and then into a little pot of dirt. Keep it moist. They root like mad things. Mine started from 6 inch cuttings, once they'd started growing new leaves I put them in the ground and within a year they were as tall as I am. If you want berries it helps to trickle your fingertips gently over the flowers and spread the yellow pollen around. The flowers make a great tea and are really good (for me) for "opening the mind" prior to looking back into memory. It's also a highly protective tree if you have a relationship with it. The berries are great for healing a cold/flu or any respitory troubles. And the leaves can be used to heal all sorts of skin problems. It has such strong associations that in folklore it was known as the "poor man's medicine chest". It has very strong pagan/craft associations in Europe and in small villages there's still some people who won't cut one down. These trees can also become guardian trees of a family depending on how you work with them. Tons of wonderful and meaningful folklore about Elders. One of my all-time favourite trees. If you grow one you develop a relationship with but then have to move, just take a cutting and root it and the spirit of that tree will move with you. If you're going to use any of the wood, take live wood not dead wood the tree has chucked out - in my way it is important to keep the spirit of the tree within the piece you are using, so you would take live wood. Carry a piece of the tree with you at all times (and have your kids do the same - it hollows out easily to make into beads) and you will always return to your hearth and always have access to the spirit of the tree. You can also make whistles from the Elder, which are great for communication between the worlds due to the significance of the Elder (depending on what spirits you work with). If you're ever in trouble, just find an Elder tree. If you have any questions.... just ask the Elder. Lovely, magical and spiritual trees, Elders.

M
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westofthemoon
Feb 18 2013 09:46 PM
Thank you, Michele! I am going to copy & paste that for my notes. Hopefully I will be able to find an elder...I'm sure I can find one growing around town this summer, or maybe the botanical garden would allow me to take a cutting.
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I hope this doesn't bother anyone but I found this thread so interesting and I hope it's ok if I add my own areas beliefs to this great thread.



Ash
The ash symbolizes peace of mind, sacrifice, sensitivity and higher awareness Helps the digestive system

Aspen
The Aspen symbolizes clarity of purpose, determination and overcoming fears and doubts Good for stress, allergies,
eczema and neuralgia


Arbutus
The sacred Arbutus symbolizes knowledge Helps the digestive system and used as an antiseptic astringent


Beech
The Beech symbolizes tolerance, past knowledge and
softening criticism Helps the digestive system and for healing wounds, sores and ulcers


Birch
The Birch symbolizes truth, new beginnings
and cleansing of the past Remedy for eczema and skin allergies


Cedar
The Cedar symbolizes cleansing, protection, prosperity & healing Used to help respiratory problems


Cherry
The Cherry tree symbolizes strong exp<b></b>ressi&#111;n, rebirth, new awakenings and compassion Colds, flu, coughs, fever, headaches, indigestion


Elm
The Elm symbolizes wisdom, strength of will and intuition Healing salves for wounds


Maple
The Maple symbolizes the tree of offering, generosity, balance, promise and practicality Helps the digestive system

Oak
The oak symbolizes strength of character and courage Eases blood
problems, improves
circulation and reduces fevers

Pine
The pine tree symbolizes creativity, peace and harmony Heals chest, throat and lung infections, colds, flu and sore throats

Sycamore

Sycamore symbolizes ambition
Astringent

Willow
The willow symbolizes inner wisdom, an open mind with the stability and strength of age and experience. Reduces inflammation, rheumatism, fevers and headaches

Walnut
The Walnut symbolizes clarity and focus, gathering of energy and beginning new projects Skin problems, colds and flu

White Pine
The White Pine symbolizes serenity Heals chest, throat infections, colds, flu and sore throats

The three medicine trees are missing from this list, the Juniper, Tamarac and Pinyon tree are so important I need to give them their very own well thought out post. I hope that's ok . These three trees are so important I just don't see away to make short little exerps all trees are important of course but these three are the ones we have a deep connection to.
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For native studies my son just did a paper on these three trees so I'm cutting and pasting some of it from his research paper I wish I could credit the sites he used but he didn't have foot notes. I hope this isn't to long but this particular tree is so important to us and was intentionally chained off reservations that I feel it deserves a special post.

Pinyon has a long list of medicinal uses. The pitch was used for a myriad of ailments including cuts, any kind
of skin problem, digestive or bowel troubles, infectious diseases such as colds, influenza, and tuberculosis, venereal disease, sore muscles, rheumatism, fevers, and internal parasites. It was also heated and applied to the face to remove unwanted hair or prevent sunburn. The inner bark was eaten as an emergency ration or made
into an expectorant tea. The needles were chewed and swallowed to increase perspiration to relieve fevers. Buds were chewed and made into a poultice for burns, or dried and pulverized to make a fumigant for earaches. Practical uses of pitch included making dyes or paints, gluing arrows, cementing turquoise jewelry, or waterproofing woven water jugs or baskets.Pine nuts were a tremendously valuable food source, and there were many more ways to eat them than just raw or roasted. They could be ground into flour and rolled into balls, made into cakes or gruel, mixed with berries andstored for winter use, mixed with yucca fruit pulp and made into a pudding, kneaded into seed butter and spread on bread, or made into stiff dough, frozen, and eaten like ice cream. Some tribes ground them with the shells for additional flavor. The value of the nuts was increased by their periodicity—good cone crops could not be counted on every year. Generally a heavy crop of pine nuts was only expected once every seven years. This often was followed by a smallpox epidemic, perhaps due to many different groups coming together to share the harvest and possibly spreading the disease.
Virtually every other part of the pinyon also had a use. Pollen was used for ceremonial purposes, sometimes
in place of cattail pollen. Pinyon wood was valuable
for house construction since it was resistant to rot and wood-eating beetles, and it was also used to make useful items such as cradles, looms, saddle parts, tools, and toys. Charcoal from pinyon wood made the best black for sand paintings, and pinyons that had been struck by lightning were valued for ceremonial uses.
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Ok last one promise lol, these two trees I know well because I still use them today for a wide variety of things. I hope I'm not over loading you guys or causing a problem if I am feel free to edit or move as you see fit.

The Tamarac tree is a lovely tree Native Americans used the different parts of the tamarack tree for a variety of applications. The new shoots are nutritious and can be boiled for food. The inner bark can be dried, ground and mixed with other flours. The sap is said to have a sweet flavor.
Tea made from tamarack bark has been used as a laxative, tonic, diuretic, for jaundice, sore throats, headaches, rheumatism and skin ailments such as burns and sores.
The Potawatomi used tamarack tea to treat distemper of horses.
Tamarack roots are used by the Ojibwe to make woven bags and for sewing canoe edges. The Cree, who call tamarack by the name "wachinakin," use parts of the tree for toboggans, snow shoes, canoes and firewood, but their most well-known use is their beautiful and lifelike goose hunting decoys, which are still made from tamarack twigs and are sold as works of art today.

Last but certainly not least is my favorite tree it symbolizes something special to me in some areas it's called red ceder but the juniper I use is Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum).
Juniper needles and boughs had additional protective powers over illness, death, and sorcery. Boughs were hung around the house during epidemics to drive germs away and were considered powerful medicine for driving away evil spirits associated with death. Hunters also rubbed themselves with juniper boughs for protection from grizzlies. Needles were burned ceremonially for their sacred, purifying smoke that could ward off illness, protect from witches, and remove fear of thunder.In contrast to pinyon, most medicinal uses of juniper came from infusions or boiled extracts of branches, twigs, needles, or cones rather than from pitch. Nevertheless, these preparations were used for a list of conditions
just as long and varied: kidney trouble, heart trouble, hemorrhages, stomachaches, headaches, menstrual cramps, colds, fevers, smallpox, flu, pneumonia, venereal disease, diabetes, cholera, tuberculosis, chickenpox, worms, swellings, rheumatism, burns, sore throats, hives or sores, and boils or slivers. A strong decoction of the cones was even used to kill ticks on horses.
The bluish, berry-like cones containing one or two seeds were boiled and eaten, or dried and used to make a drink, or ground into meal and added to water for a drink or to make into cake. They were also pierced and strung for beads. The Okanagan-Colville tribe of British Columbia considered the cones to be poisonous and used them
on bullets or arrowheads to kill people more quickly in warfare, yet they also made a drink from the cones and drank it in the sweathouse.
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