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Traditional Witchcraft


In the article, I will frequently use the word "some" because of the vast amount of traditions out there of Traditional Witchcraft.

What is Traditional Witchcraft? Traditional Witchcraft is not Wicca; Traditional Witchcraft is Traditional Paganism. It is the practice of pre-Wiccan and pre-Christian beliefs (or at least trying to revive the old ways). There are many traditions in Traditional Witchcraft and it should be noted that not all Trads have the same beliefs and practices, but there are basic principles that are followed. Now on to the differences: Wicca is an oath bound, orthopraxic, fertility-based witch cult and mystery religion. Gerald B. Gardner created it in the 1950s and he never actually called it Wicca, but rather "Wica". Traditional Wicca requires its members to be initiated into a coven to actually be considered Wiccan and therefore there is no such thing as a "solitary Wiccan". It is said that in Wicca, one must be initiated in order to receive the Inner Court information (such as the deities "true" names). Depending on the tradition, Traditionalists may or may not require the seeker to be initiated.

Traditional Witchcraft does not follow the Wiccan Rede (created by Gerald B. Gardner) or the Threefold Law. "An ye harm none, do what ye will" is a part of the Wiccan Rede and many people refer to this as a law, when in fact the word "rede" actually means advice. We take responsibility for whatever we do, whether it be harming or healing. Traditionalists know that there is a creative and destructive side of nature; therefore there is no "white" or "black" magic. There are many Eastern philosophies included in Wicca (such as Karma), but Witchcraft originated from Western Europe and Trads prefer to stay true to the old ways which include folk magic. Traditional Witchcraft may be considered a religion to some, while others consider it just a craft, incorporating the craft into their religion. It all depends really.

Wiccans write in a journal that's called a Book of Shadows. They keep their workings, rituals, and other information in it. Some Trads do not keep a journal of their workings because of the belief that one should forget about it after it is done and then some write down their workings and experiences. Personally, I keep a binder full of my own workings that I have written and other information (such as moon cycles, planetary symbols and cycles, rune symbols, herbs and their chemical uses, etc.) that I call a grimoire. Some just call their book a journal. It really doesn't matter what you call it. The land and the ancestors are very important aspects of Traditional Witchcraft. Some Trads call on their ancestors for aid in working. I call on spirits and my ancestors in my workings and in divination; I ask for their wisdom and their guidance. While working outdoors, it is not uncommon for Trads to call on the land spirits or communicate with them. Spirits are an important aspect of Traditional Witchcraft. Ancestors are very important in the Trad. Craft because we searched for the old ways, which come from our ancestors! Spirits can provide us with knowledge and power. Spirits protect us when in working; they are called upon to bring power. We are surrounded by spirits, hence why they're important.

Many Traditional Witches do not believe in deities and many do. It all depends on your beliefs. I don't believe in deities and never have. I believe in and use the power of nature. We don't "worship" nature, though, as many people believe. Fate is a belief held by many. Many believe that your past affects your present and your present affects your future. I don't believe that our future has been laid out for us. This is the Way of Wyrd. Free will is also not believed in, as this is a part of Christian faith and the neo-Pagan movement. Although free will is not believed in by many, there is still common sense; if you manipulate a person's mind to love you and they do not truly do, do you believe it will actually last? Hexes, curses, jinxes, etc. are not shunned in Traditional Witchcraft. If one truly needs to perform a hex or something of the like because the individual, friends, or family were hurt badly, then one would. Hexes and jinxes can be seen as a little slap, whereas curses are more extreme in their power. I have performed a few hexes and one curse; the curse was worked because of the extreme pain it caused a certain friend and I and how badly we were hurt for multiple years. I've seen many "fluffy" sites describing how it's always better to fill a person's heart with love instead of performing hexes, jinxes, and curses and not recognizing the destructive side of nature at all! While it is better to perform "positive" workings, do you really think that filling a person's heart with love will stop them from doing the degrading things they have done?

Traditionalists do not believe in the Summerlands as Wiccans do. We believe that spirits dwell in the spirit world, or Otherworld, and may return as a land spirit or in the form of something else. There are three levels of the world: Underworld, where the spirits dwell and where wisdom is kept, Middle World, what we live in, and the Upperworld, the home of the divine. The belief of afterlife varies from person to person. Hedge-riding is a practice that involves travelling to the spirit world through the use of trance work and other various techniques to alter the conscious mind (including entheogens, which are herbs and other substances used to induce trance) which allows the spirit to leave the body. Shamanic journeying is another practice involving leaving the body for spiritual growth; it is very similar to hedge-riding and is essentially rooted off of it. Common techniques to induce trance involve drumming, rattling, heavy dancing, rocking, entheogens, meditation, flying ointments, and a lot more. Books for the beginner are Hedge-Rider by Eric De Vries, Trance-portation by Diana L. Paxson, and The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft by Christopher Penczak.

Many Traditionalists do not cast circles and some may cast what they call a "compass round" which is basically a circle, but does not have the same use as a circle does to a Wiccan or neo-pagan. Wiccans use circles in order to keep the energy within it and then send it out to the Universe, whereas a compass round is used for protection. A circle in Wicca creates a sacred space to perform their workings, but Trads consider all land sacred and therefore do not need to perform a compass round for a sacred space. Sabbat, or festival, observations and celebrations differ from tradition to tradition. Some Trads observe four and some observe eight. Personally, I observe eight. I do not relate these sabbats to specific legends that Wiccans believe in. I observe them for the change in nature.

Some Trads use the pentagram to symbolize the elements of the earth (Earth, Air, Fire, Water, and Spirit) while others don't believe in these elements because it originates from the East. Many neo-Pagan associate these elements with guardians/watchtowers to the four directions of the earth. Personally, I believe in the energy that flows from the four directions and from above and below. Robin Artisson has explained this in detail on his website. The symbol of this is called the "Witches Foot" or Hagal rune (from the Armanen Futharkh). Animism is a part of Traditional Witchcraft because we believe everything on this earth has a spirit (like plants, trees, etc.), just like Shamans.

Although there are many differences between Wicca, Traditional Witchcraft, and Neo-Paganism we all believe that nature is sacred and seek knowledge of the abyss.
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75 Comments

Not to rain on your parade, but are you sure it is a Deity that is doing the smacking. The world is full of tricksters and others who aren't what they seem to be or what you think they are. Once you have identified something or someone, you tend to attribute characteristics to it based on your preconceived notions. If that entity is not what you supposed it to be, you could get into a pickle.

Jevne


This is what happened. I had a Native American style Tarot reading done by a woman who is remarkable. It was an hour and a half long and everything she said was right on the money with the exception of a couple of head scratchers, which were clarified in other ways later. During the reading, she looked at me and said "what deities do you work with", to which I replied "none, just Mother Earth and Father Sky". She looked at me and said "are you familiar with Bridgit", I told her that I knew only a little about her. She then said "you really need to look into her". So, I studied up on her, and discovered that many of her attributes are consistent with the things happening on my path, thus far. So, I meditated on her and got that hot, tingly thing in my palms that I get when I focus my energy. That's when I felt like I was being whacked on the head. Very soon after, I had a very new experience that I was not expecting at all. Trusting and valuing your opinion, as I do Jevne, does this make sense to you?

Elizabeth
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This is what happened. I had a Native American style Tarot reading done by a woman who is remarkable. It was an hour and a half long and everything she said was right on the money with the exception of a couple of head scratchers, which were clarified in other ways later. During the reading, she looked at me and said "what deities do you work with", to which I replied "none, just Mother Earth and Father Sky". She looked at me and said "are you familiar with Bridgit", I told her that I knew only a little about her. She then said "you really need to look into her". So, I studied up on her, and discovered that many of her attributes are consistent with the things happening on my path, thus far. So, I meditated on her and got that hot, tingly thing in my palms that I get when I focus my energy. That's when I felt like I was being whacked on the head. Very soon after, I had a very new experience that I was not expecting at all. Trusting and valuing your opinion, as I do Jevne, does this make sense to you?

Elizabeth


Hi, Elizabeth:

Every once in awhile, we meet someone that we feel that we have known for ages. You know the type of interaction I am referring to. You feel instantly at ease with each other. That type of immediate connection is possible in the mundane and the magical world, so I believe and understand what you are saying and what you felt.

I only suggest that you take time to get to know and understand this new connection and/or feeling. Even if you do feel immediately at ease with someone, you have to take the time to really get to know each other, explore the boundaries of the relationship. Show respect and curiousity and openness, but do not immediately assume the role of underling or student to be guided. If this new connection (be it Deity or not) is true, this new relationship will blossom and grow in time.

Jevne
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Every once in awhile, we meet someone that we feel that we have known for ages. You know the type of interaction I am referring to. You feel instantly at ease with each other. That type of immediate connection is possible in the mundane and the magical world, so I believe and understand what you are saying and what you felt.


Do you think these experiences could have to do with, or are sometimes are influenced by, past lives and past relationships and acquaintances?
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Hi, Elizabeth:

Every once in awhile, we meet someone that we feel that we have known for ages. You know the type of interaction I am referring to. You feel instantly at ease with each other. That type of immediate connection is possible in the mundane and the magical world, so I believe and understand what you are saying and what you felt.

I only suggest that you take time to get to know and understand this new connection and/or feeling. Even if you do feel immediately at ease with someone, you have to take the time to really get to know each other, explore the boundaries of the relationship. Show respect and curiousity and openness, but do not immediately assume the role of underling or student to be guided. If this new connection (be it Deity or not) is true, this new relationship will blossom and grow in time.

Jevne

Thank you, Jevne. That is very good advice. Patience is something I am having to really work on these days. I'm also trying to rely on my own instinct more and more. Hopefully, if I can accomplish these two things, I may have less questions! (Yeah RIGHT!)
Elizabeth
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Do you think these experiences could have to do with, or are sometimes are influenced by, past lives and past relationships and acquaintances?


That is a distinct possibility. While I am not convinced of the inevitability (sp?) of reincarnation, as implied by the reference to past lives, I am open to and accepting of the idea, as one of the possible post- or pre-life outcomes for humans.

Certain members of my family describe the concept of reincarnation in the following way . . .

The universal consciousness is a "soup" of "soul matter". When a person is about to be born, a spoon full of soul is pour into that person. The soup starter (i.e. soul) forms the base of that specific person's soul. Over time, the person adds to or takes away from this personal bowl of soul soup, until one day the person dies. Whatever is left in the person's soul bowl is returned to the universal consciousness and, thus, made available for redistribution into another person.

I'm not saying, at this point, that I agree or disagree. Just offering up some food for thought.

Jevne
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That is a distinct possibility. While I am not convinced of the inevitability (sp?) of reincarnation, as implied by the reference to past lives, I am open to and accepting of the idea, as one of the possible post- or pre-life outcomes for humans.

Certain members of my family describe the concept of reincarnation in the following way . . .

The universal consciousness is a "soup" of "soul matter". When a person is about to be born, a spoon full of soul is pour into that person. The soup starter (i.e. soul) forms the base of that specific person's soul. Over time, the person adds to or takes away from this personal bowl of soul soup, until one day the person dies. Whatever is left in the person's soul bowl is returned to the universal consciousness and, thus, made available for redistribution into another person.

I'm not saying, at this point, that I agree or disagree. Just offering up some food for thought.

Jevne



soup for though anyway.
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CelticGypsy
Dec 22 2010 12:43 AM
Interesting how the analogy of soup/ soul, Jevne. I was reminded of my children as they were growing up. When they were at the ages of 6-7 months, I would not think of giving them food not applicable to their digestive systems. But being crawling babies, I constantly had to take things out of their mouths, ie : carpet lint, the occassional bread tab. Being down at that level, they were keen on finding articles, not seen on my upper level. Even tho, the plane I gave them to crawl upon I thought was devoid of such unpalatable things. We as these seekers do not necessarily know what is good to consume or not, on our path. So as babes as it were, for the lack of a better word, tend to put in our concience souls because it's palatable, not necessarily good for us, but it the lack of awareness that we have. Perhaps that may be why one would find wiccan principles and dogma so appetizing ? I realise that this is a bit far removed from the reincarnation subject matter, of which I acknowledge my detour, but it was a revelation to me none the less, and I thank you for sparking that for me. You definately added " food for thought "

Regards,
Gypsy
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Interesting how the analogy of soup/ soul, Jevne. I was reminded of my children as they were growing up. When they were at the ages of 6-7 months, I would not think of giving them food not applicable to their digestive systems. But being crawling babies, I constantly had to take things out of their mouths, ie : carpet lint, the occassional bread tab. Being down at that level, they were keen on finding articles, not seen on my upper level. Even tho, the plane I gave them to crawl upon I thought was devoid of such unpalatable things. We as these seekers do not necessarily know what is good to consume or not, on our path. So as babes as it were, for the lack of a better word, tend to put in our concience souls because it's palatable, not necessarily good for us, but it the lack of awareness that we have. Perhaps that may be why one would find wiccan principles and dogma so appetizing ? I realise that this is a bit far removed from the reincarnation subject matter, of which I acknowledge my detour, but it was a revelation to me none the less, and I thank you for sparking that for me. You definately added " food for thought "

Regards,
Gypsy


Happy that we were able to connect in this way. "Lack of awareness" . . . I wonder how many of the worlds' troubles can be attributed to that?

Jevne
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Foxgloveandtrillium
May 17 2011 03:46 PM
This is a really nice article. The explanation of the levels of existence is really interesting, given that it closely aligns with my conclusions about the cosmos, though I had never really heard anyone talking about this. Sometimes going with gut instinct works out. The discussions going on here are helpful as well.
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Abraxia Thalgus
May 18 2011 03:42 AM
I've recently started to re-evaluate my attitude to deity. After spending 7 years as apart of a very fundamentalist baptist church, I grew to hate the word 'god'. I still cannot accept an all powerful, omnipresent being that controls my destiny and gets to choose if i've been naughty or nice when I die. It just rankles. However, what I can live with is the conecpt of deities that are elements from another realm or plane of existence, which we might consider 'above' us. I can acknowledge working with such beings in partnership to get the task done, just as long as they don't try to take over. Still not sure if I actually believe in their existance, but I would be much more willing to accept this form of deity if they did.
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I still struggle with the concept of deity, maybe I always will. Like Abraxia, I have a certain amount of revulsion for the term "God" and have a hard time separating it from xtian dogma. I am much more comfortable with the concept of "spirits" and "ancestors" and, at least for now, will continue to roll with that. However, that's one of the things about the ever-changing nature of this path-it's impossible to know what will happen next week, next month or next year that might make me change my entire outlook. :teehee:
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I've recently started to re-evaluate my attitude to deity. After spending 7 years as apart of a very fundamentalist baptist church, I grew to hate the word 'god'. I still cannot accept an all powerful, omnipresent being that controls my destiny and gets to choose if i've been naughty or nice when I die. It just rankles. However, what I can live with is the conecpt of deities that are elements from another realm or plane of existence, which we might consider 'above' us. I can acknowledge working with such beings in partnership to get the task done, just as long as they don't try to take over. Still not sure if I actually believe in their existance, but I would be much more willing to accept this form of deity if they did.



I was having a conversation with a friend this morning about this.. and how for many the concept of "god" has been tainted, molded or skewed by the influence of christianity and the fundamentalist experiences of the "one and only" version of a diety. I can remember as a preteen thinking of the absurdity that "god" was an omniscient old man with a pen*s in the sky, keeping a check and balance sheet of our actions and weighing them to determine our worthiness to play on his playground. As a late teen and for many years, the whole experience left a bitter taste in my mouth for deities and anything resembling god worship. But, as they say, time mellows and somewhere along the way I have reached an understanding and acceptance of the purpose of deities and deity worship (purpose to my understanding).
My beliefs are somewhat like yours AT. I believe in a collective energy that embodies all things.. this energy is beyond a singular form (esp. gender). There is the idea of transcendent divine ability. A study of any ancient society reveals them to be centered upon a unique pantheon of gods/ goddesses. Civilization itself is concentrated on the worship and maintenance of its deities. To understand the story of any civilization begins in an understanding of their gods. The relationship of gods to a civilization is that of reciprocity. The civilization receives interconnectedness and the deity the concentration of energy and growth in divinity or power. A relationship that waxes and wanes with the conditions of the time. One can even see how the worship of a singular god would be preferred in order to provide a unity, growth of economy , amplifying the congruence and essential power of the civilization. A bit of a ramble and off topic..
It is my belief that gods are energies, beings or spirits that have achieved a transcendence over the linear of this realm and can be used as a conduit for us to focus and connect to the greater collective. Are they necessary for ones path , not in my opinion.. are they useful, yes , to many..
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I still struggle with the concept of deity, maybe I always will. Like Abraxia, I have a certain amount of revulsion for the term "God" and have a hard time separating it from xtian dogma. I am much more comfortable with the concept of "spirits" and "ancestors" and, at least for now, will continue to roll with that. However, that's one of the things about the ever-changing nature of this path-it's impossible to know what will happen next week, next month or next year that might make me change my entire outlook. :teehee:


Try replacing the word "god" with the phrase "very evolved and knowledgable entity" and see if that helps any. God is a human word humans came up with to describe something they couldn't comprehend. You can call it a Fred or a Susan or a gender-ambiguous Shane to dis-associate yourself form the cultural perception of the Judeo-Christian "God."

M
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OMG! I know "a gender-ambiguous Shane" . . . no joke. Someone had to sneak a peak in the personnel file to determine that Shane is actually a girl. That is just too strange. I don't think anyone is worshipping her, though.

J
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I do believe that what goes around, comes around. Its not a karmic statement or because some divine force intervenes, I just believe in cause and effect. If you behave a certain way in life, there are consequences, be they positive or negative. As for diety, yes I do have a personal diety. I dont worship my diety, I give reverence to the qualities of that diety, much like in Buddhism (as I understand it), Buddha was not a god, reverence is paid to the qualities of the buddha. My opinion is that whatever you call "the spark of life" is irrelevant because language is just a tool. If using archetypes to give form to your affinity to that spark, provides comfort or aids you to direct energy, then use it. I dont believe there is any singular way of thinking that encompasses witchcraft. Each to their own. As for a Book of Shadows, I have many journals. I like to make notes, they cover workings, readings, dreams, diary pages, when and where to find certain plants and any other information that I feel is worth making a note of. My Mother always said that a tidy mind is a healthy one, making notes for me, is part of having a tidy mind because Im not juggling endless fragments of information.
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I belive we sometimes attribute diety status to a spirit entity we may encounter along our path. We are all a part of the collective energy web which includes the other diminsions which are also chock full of other entities. Being non-human doesn't qualify being to be called a diety or godlike. My belief on where the divine dwells is that they/it are pretty much unreachable for the most part and that we may have contact with those who represent them or avatars we create ourselves in order to connect to the divine. I follow a loosly constucted shamanic path which leads me to some travel and contact with others beings. So far I have not encountered any gods. Some spirits/entities are just as vulneable as we are and have the same foibles and personality differences as we humans do. And then some are very fierce and mighty and merit respect to not interfere with or annoy them, which is when we usually get the slap to the head. Just my opinion and experience.
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In the article, I will frequently use the word "some" because of the vast amount of traditions out there of Traditional Witchcraft.

What is Traditional Witchcraft? Traditional Witchcraft is not Wicca; Traditional Witchcraft is Traditional Paganism. It is the practice of pre-Wiccan and pre-Christian beliefs (or at least trying to revive the old ways). There are many traditions in Traditional Witchcraft and it should be noted that not all Trads have the same beliefs and practices, but there are basic principles that are followed. Now on to the differences: Wicca is an oath bound, orthopraxic, fertility-based witch cult and mystery religion. Gerald B. Gardner created it in the 1950s and he never actually called it Wicca, but rather "Wica". Traditional Wicca requires its members to be initiated into a coven to actually be considered Wiccan and therefore there is no such thing as a "solitary Wiccan". It is said that in Wicca, one must be initiated in order to receive the Inner Court information (such as the deities "true" names). Depending on the tradition, Traditionalists may or may not require the seeker to be initiated.

Traditional Witchcraft does not follow the Wiccan Rede (created by Gerald B. Gardner) or the Threefold Law. "An ye harm none, do what ye will" is a part of the Wiccan Rede and many people refer to this as a law, when in fact the word "rede" actually means advice. We take responsibility for whatever we do, whether it be harming or healing. Traditionalists know that there is a creative and destructive side of nature; therefore there is no "white" or "black" magic. There are many Eastern philosophies included in Wicca (such as Karma), but Witchcraft originated from Western Europe and Trads prefer to stay true to the old ways which include folk magic. Traditional Witchcraft may be considered a religion to some, while others consider it just a craft, incorporating the craft into their religion. It all depends really.

Wiccans write in a journal that's called a Book of Shadows. They keep their workings, rituals, and other information in it. Some Trads do not keep a journal of their workings because of the belief that one should forget about it after it is done and then some write down their workings and experiences. Personally, I keep a binder full of my own workings that I have written and other information (such as moon cycles, planetary symbols and cycles, rune symbols, herbs and their chemical uses, etc.) that I call a grimoire. Some just call their book a journal. It really doesn't matter what you call it. The land and the ancestors are very important aspects of Traditional Witchcraft. Some Trads call on their ancestors for aid in working. I call on spirits and my ancestors in my workings and in divination; I ask for their wisdom and their guidance. While working outdoors, it is not uncommon for Trads to call on the land spirits or communicate with them. Spirits are an important aspect of Traditional Witchcraft. Ancestors are very important in the Trad. Craft because we searched for the old ways, which come from our ancestors! Spirits can provide us with knowledge and power. Spirits protect us when in working; they are called upon to bring power. We are surrounded by spirits, hence why they're important.

Many Traditional Witches do not believe in deities and many do. It all depends on your beliefs. I don't believe in deities and never have. I believe in and use the power of nature. We don't "worship" nature, though, as many people believe. Fate is a belief held by many. Many believe that your past affects your present and your present affects your future. I don't believe that our future has been laid out for us. This is the Way of Wyrd. Free will is also not believed in, as this is a part of Christian faith and the neo-Pagan movement. Although free will is not believed in by many, there is still common sense; if you manipulate a person's mind to love you and they do not truly do, do you believe it will actually last? Hexes, curses, jinxes, etc. are not shunned in Traditional Witchcraft. If one truly needs to perform a hex or something of the like because the individual, friends, or family were hurt badly, then one would. Hexes and jinxes can be seen as a little slap, whereas curses are more extreme in their power. I have performed a few hexes and one curse; the curse was worked because of the extreme pain it caused a certain friend and I and how badly we were hurt for multiple years. I've seen many "fluffy" sites describing how it's always better to fill a person's heart with love instead of performing hexes, jinxes, and curses and not recognizing the destructive side of nature at all! While it is better to perform "positive" workings, do you really think that filling a person's heart with love will stop them from doing the degrading things they have done?

Traditionalists do not believe in the Summerlands as Wiccans do. We believe that spirits dwell in the spirit world, or Otherworld, and may return as a land spirit or in the form of something else. There are three levels of the world: Underworld, where the spirits dwell and where wisdom is kept, Middle World, what we live in, and the Upperworld, the home of the divine. The belief of afterlife varies from person to person. Hedge-riding is a practice that involves travelling to the spirit world through the use of trance work and other various techniques to alter the conscious mind (including entheogens, which are herbs and other substances used to induce trance) which allows the spirit to leave the body. Shamanic journeying is another practice involving leaving the body for spiritual growth; it is very similar to hedge-riding and is essentially rooted off of it. Common techniques to induce trance involve drumming, rattling, heavy dancing, rocking, entheogens, meditation, flying ointments, and a lot more. Books for the beginner are Hedge-Rider by Eric De Vries, Trance-portation by Diana L. Paxson, and The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft by Christopher Penczak.

Many Traditionalists do not cast circles and some may cast what they call a "compass round" which is basically a circle, but does not have the same use as a circle does to a Wiccan or neo-pagan. Wiccans use circles in order to keep the energy within it and then send it out to the Universe, whereas a compass round is used for protection. A circle in Wicca creates a sacred space to perform their workings, but Trads consider all land sacred and therefore do not need to perform a compass round for a sacred space. Sabbat, or festival, observations and celebrations differ from tradition to tradition. Some Trads observe four and some observe eight. Personally, I observe eight. I do not relate these sabbats to specific legends that Wiccans believe in. I observe them for the change in nature.

Some Trads use the pentagram to symbolize the elements of the earth (Earth, Air, Fire, Water, and Spirit) while others don't believe in these elements because it originates from the East. Many neo-Pagan associate these elements with guardians/watchtowers to the four directions of the earth. Personally, I believe in the energy that flows from the four directions and from above and below. Robin Artisson has explained this in detail on his website. The symbol of this is called the "Witches Foot" or Hagal rune (from the Armanen Futharkh). Animism is a part of Traditional Witchcraft because we believe everything on this earth has a spirit (like plants, trees, etc.), just like Shamans.

Although there are many differences between Wicca, Traditional Witchcraft, and Neo-Paganism we all believe that nature is sacred and seek knowledge of the abyss.



Just wanted to say thanks for this article. I learned a lot from reading this tonight.


~Ruby
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loved reading this post. It is very interesting. i enjoyed it very much.
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Like a breath of fresh air!
Thanks
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Wytchywoman
Jan 14 2012 06:20 AM
Thank you Anara for putting that articles out in the front to read. It is a wonderful article for those that are exploring the traditional path to read. :witch_bounce:
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westofthemoon
Jan 18 2012 08:04 PM

I've seen many "fluffy" sites describing how it's always better to fill a person's heart with love instead of performing hexes, jinxes, and curses and not recognizing the destructive side of nature at all! While it is better to perform "positive" workings, do you really think that filling a person's heart with love will stop them from doing the degrading things they have done?

This. Drives. Me. Crazy. Especially because that philosophy reminds me waaaay too much of the "turn the other cheek" and "vengeance is Mine" Xtian "commandments" which I grew up having hammered into my skull.

Another great article to have bumped up, one I really enjoyed reading.
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Really enjoyed reading this article. Its very helpful and well written.
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Good point about trance. You mentioned your belief about deities, do you consider spirits different? Do you recognize individual spirits? I ask this since you mentioned the belief in spirit of nature.
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Good point about trance. You mentioned your belief about deities, do you consider spirits different? Do you recogniz

e individual spirits? I ask this since you mentioned the belief in spirit of nature.



My experience, or should i say my translation of my experience is trance/ voyerism,hope I spelt that right.That's what it feels like to me.Don't do the deities, so can't comment. Most definitely recognize individual spirits. Never meet a land spirit in person,tho I have some knowledge of them,well some of them. Spirits of nature/plant I class as different to the other two.Gonna get slaughtered now,lol.
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Teacup Witch
Sep 02 2012 10:50 PM
I just finished reading your article and I must say that I found it quite refreshing to read. It is so nice to hear someone give information in a down to earth fashion. I must say that I am not one who always like frills, fluffiness etc. Finally I feel that after all these years there are opinions similar to mine.

Thank you...:thankyou:
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