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Strega Nona


sarahdansbee

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Not your normal book questions but I had to ask.

 

I picked up my daughter from Kindergarten this afternoon, and saw this sitting in a place of honor in the classroom.

 

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Apparently, there's a whole series of these stories about Strega Nona and the interesting things that go on around her. In this particular one, she gets turned into a frog and her students have to figure out how to turn her back. Has any one read these stories and what did you think? I'm thinking I might have to pick them up for the Monkey...

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I'm sort of surprise that they have a book like that in the classroom.

 

I could be wrong since I forgot how the word is spelled correctly -- Is Strega a short version of that word for the Italian witches ?

 

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.

 

I'm sort of surprise that they have a book like that in the classroom.

 

I could be wrong since I forgot how the word is spelled correctly -- Is Strega a short version of that word for the Italian witches ?

 

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Strega means witch and Nona is a term for grandmother, so essentially she's Grandmother Witch.

 

Here's the synopsis from Wikipedia regarding the first book in the series: "The book focuses on the exploits of Strega Nona, a sort of female witch doctor noted throughout her home village for her numerous successful remedies. She employs the assistance of a dim but lanky young man named Big Anthony, leaving her residence under his care while visiting a close acquaintance one day. Big Anthony is intrigued by Strega Nona's enchanted pot, used for cooking unlimited amounts of pasta upon the chanting of a spell. Big Anthony decides to use the pot to his advantage by summoning humongous amounts of pasta for the villagers; however, a great sea of noodles overflows the entire town. Strega Nona returns home, and Big Anthony pleads for her assistance; she hands a fork to the troublesome young man and commands him to eat all of the pasta which he had conjured."

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.

 

I'm sort of surprise that they have a book like that in the classroom.

 

I could be wrong since I forgot how the word is spelled correctly -- Is Strega a short version of that word for the Italian witches ?

 

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These books have been around for a while and I became aware of them at school. It's just a cute little kid's book, basically.

 

 

 

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I am sure the book is great for the children

 

I guess I was just surprised at the title of the book "Strega Nona".

 

The question is - would the book still have been enjoying the same status among teachers, etc if the book had the title "Grandmother Witch" (in english) instead ?

 

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The question is - would the book still have been enjoying the same status among teachers, etc if the book had the title "Grandmother Witch" (in english) instead ?

 

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Probably. There are tons of children's books with witches in their stories- even good witches. Witches are a big part of the fantasy genre, after all.

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I seen this at my kids school as well and told my daughter to check it out for me. I was shocked to see it there. Still waiting for her to get it so I can read it, lol.

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It's a nice series, and it teaches principles to kids. I like the positive witch image also. One of my favorite Strega Nona books is Strega Nona Meets Her Match. It's about old witchcraft versus new. It ends with Strega Nona saying that the Old Ways are the best ways.

 

Not your normal book questions but I had to ask.

 

I picked up my daughter from Kindergarten this afternoon, and saw this sitting in a place of honor in the classroom.

 

98586679313467516_5Jp4RrZa_b.jpg

 

 

Apparently, there's a whole series of these stories about Strega Nona and the interesting things that go on around her. In this particular one, she gets turned into a frog and her students have to figure out how to turn her back. Has any one read these stories and what did you think? I'm thinking I might have to pick them up for the Monkey...

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Greetings All

 

We have a couple of em and I think the kids love em as much as I do. I was especially touched by the Vacanza one where Nonna hears her Nonna speaking from Cielo telling here to take a break ... an interesting melange of ideas - very in keeping with actual witchcraft and strega really ...

 

Fraternally

 

Scott

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I have never seen or heard of these books, they do sound so enchanting. I shall have to source them,would be great for the grandchildren.may start with the vacation and nonna in the sky one.sometimes wonder where iv have been most of my life to not know some of these things. :grin_witch:

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  • 3 weeks later...

http://www.tomie.com/about_tomie/index.html

 

I have read many Tomie de Paulo books with my children; I like his stories, his folk art illustrations, and yes particularly Strega Nona. Many of the author's books focus on Catholic traditions and I think some school librarians and parents may think he is practising Catholic but I haven't found any reference by the author stating he is Catholic. Many of his books are quite lovely.

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We love Strega Nona. Just read the Christmas one. Another really good "witchy book for kids" is The Ballad of Biddy Early, which is poems about Biddy Early, her magic blue bottle, and her ways.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I hadn't heard of this series of books but they look wonderful! I'm not too surprised to hear that they're in kindergarten, when I was in pre-school (and school in general) we had a series of books called Meg And Mog, which is about a witch and her cat - I love those books :) Also, the Worst Witch series of books which I remember reading as a child but I can't remember much about them now. I think schools are much more open to witchcraft if it comes in the form of fiction books.

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