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thorn needles


emily

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Am making some thorn needles,I usually varnish mine to make them harder,would appreciate any other suggestions on what can be used.

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Would never have thought of that, what a crackin idea. Thank you ,and yep eyes are done,always do them first .

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Am making some thorn needles,I usually varnish mine to make them harder,would appreciate any other suggestions on what can be used.

 

Most thorn plants can be used for protection/defense or aggression. I'd look at the nature and folklore of the plant you got the thorns from.

 

M

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Fire-hardening is also an age-old method. Instead of charring them and sanding off the char I'd actually suggest using sand to harden them - A method generally used for quills.

This produces a pretty hard end, sufficient to use as pins at the least.

I'd cut any eyes before hardening, though.

 

Nice link - I might give that a try with one of the egret feathers...

 

M

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This produces a pretty hard end, sufficient to use as pins at the least.

 

 

Most thorn plants can be used for protection/defense or aggression. I'd look at the nature and folklore of the plant you got the thorns from.

 

M

 

Interesting post, I've been comming back to this as it's gnawing on me. I understand the traditional method of these used, but something that Scylla says almost as an afterthought, really perked my interest.

 

Now using these as needles with their lore and the intention crafted by the Witch is understandable. Would a Witch object as to the "pinning" as Scylla offers, to hold or bind something together in a working, before the Witch fully addresses the proper spell work to form the intentional end result or outcome ? I know when I make slip covers or work with the sewing craft, I use alot of pins to bind my material together, not only does that help me conceptualize what my slip cover will look like, it gives me the advantage to re-adjust it if it needs it.

 

Interesting..... makes me think.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

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Am making some thorn needles,I usually varnish mine to make them harder,would appreciate any other suggestions on what can be used.

 

I use regular sewing needles a lot in my craft, and making needles from thorns just hadn't occurred to me. What an awesome idea! I'm glad you posted this. :) I think the thorns on my prickly pear cactus would be perfect, and I have some blackthorns too (thanks to the lovely Honeythorn ;) )

 

 

Fire-hardening is also an age-old method. Instead of charring them and sanding off the char I'd actually suggest using sand to harden them - A method generally used for quills.

This produces a pretty hard end, sufficient to use as pins at the least.

I'd cut any eyes before hardening, though.

 

I'm going to give this a try!

 

Most thorn plants can be used for protection/defense or aggression. I'd look at the nature and folklore of the plant you got the thorns from.

 

M

 

She asked how to harden them.. is there folklore about how to harden them???

 

Interesting post, I've been comming back to this as it's gnawing on me. I understand the traditional method of these used, but something that Scylla says almost as an afterthought, really perked my interest.

 

Now using these as needles with their lore and the intention crafted by the Witch is understandable. Would a Witch object as to the "pinning" as Scylla offers, to hold or bind something together in a working, before the Witch fully addresses the proper spell work to form the intentional end result or outcome ? I know when I make slip covers or work with the sewing craft, I use alot of pins to bind my material together, not only does that help me conceptualize what my slip cover will look like, it gives me the advantage to re-adjust it if it needs it.

 

Interesting..... makes me think.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

I have used my sewing needles on poppets in that way - readjusting as I felt necessary as the work manifested in the target.

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I'd cut any eyes before hardening, though.

 

Sorry but what does that actually mean? Why do "eyes" need to be cut? By eyes do you mean knots in the wood where a leaf would have grown from?

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Sorry but what does that actually mean? Why do "eyes" need to be cut? By eyes do you mean knots in the wood where a leaf would have grown from?

 

 

 

I have posted a few on my gallery, don't know to put pics on here lol.

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Interesting post, I've been comming back to this as it's gnawing on me. I understand the traditional method of these used, but something that Scylla says almost as an afterthought, really perked my interest.

 

Now using these as needles with their lore and the intention crafted by the Witch is understandable. Would a Witch object as to the "pinning" as Scylla offers, to hold or bind something together in a working, before the Witch fully addresses the proper spell work to form the intentional end result or outcome ? I know when I make slip covers or work with the sewing craft, I use alot of pins to bind my material together, not only does that help me conceptualize what my slip cover will look like, it gives me the advantage to re-adjust it if it needs it.

 

Interesting..... makes me think.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

 

 

You can, im sure use them any witch way ( lol) you want to CG, I use the blackthorn for sewing because they are longer and sticking in stuff due to their nature.When they cut the hedgerow,that's when i harvest the branches of the hedge,so I can go to it as and when needed.The dog rose, well that has an interesting thorn.Also remember the colour chat some of us had,well ,not just the thread but also the thorns can be colored when using for pins if wished. I haven't done that myself but could be interesting don't you think.

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What about using Gooseberry thorns? Sweet tart fruits but VICIOUS thorns. We have 2 gooseberry bushes on our allotment, and the thorns are wicked sharp and remarkably large. I believe they are a US variety of gooseberry too ( big sweet fruits not sharp sour ones )

 

The thorns aren't long enough to sew with but would certainly be useable for pinning or tacking down like a drawing pin?

 

I would guess they could be used for other things also, protection being the obvious. The thorns on a gooseberry grow above and around the fruit, which hangs underneath in lines and clusters , so you have no option but to risk being prickled/stabbed ( and you WILL be ) when you try to pick any fruit.

 

As a warning also? The thorns are so very numerous, and yet not immediately visible due to the foliage, that they serve as a very good warning not to just shove your hand in the bush to try and grab it's fruits ! OUCH!

 

I saved some twigs and thorns the last time my brother pruned ours. Never had a use for them but I keep them nonetheless.

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Honey Locust is also another tree with long spines (I've seen a few locally that were in excess of six inches) suitable for needles and pins. The wood of that tree is particularly sturdy, so they don't need a whole lot of hardening.

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Oh my gosh S,what a beautiful tree,I have just pulled some pics of it up.the thorns are amazing.they do look very hardy.My my what fun,could really run amuck with those thorns hehe. I have never seen A honey locust tree before,dose the blossom smell lovely? Thank you for that reference.

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Honey Locust is also another tree with long spines (I've seen a few locally that were in excess of six inches) suitable for needles and pins. The wood of that tree is particularly sturdy, so they don't need a whole lot of hardening.

 

One of my personal favorites . . . lovely and vicious; a perfect combination.

 

J

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One of my personal favorites . . . lovely and vicious; a perfect combination.

 

J

 

 

Lol, dose sound good.

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I googled it , it grows where I live too. I wonder if it's hiding in the woods near me. I know the BuckThorn grows here, and they have long spikes/thorns. Some research into the lore of these would be warrented, imho.

 

+ 1 Scylla, nice find.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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I googled it , it grows where I live too. I wonder if it's hiding in the woods near me. I know the BuckThorn grows here, and they have long spikes/thorns. Some research into the lore of these would be warrented, imho.

 

+ 1 Scylla, nice find.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

BTW, honey locust smells amazing in the springtime. The fragrance will carry for miles on the wind. All of the ones that I have access to are located in marsh areas or near rivers.

 

J

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BTW, honey locust smells amazing in the springtime. The fragrance will carry for miles on the wind. All of the ones that I have access to are located in marsh areas or near rivers.

 

J

 

 

Jev's do you happen to know any Lore on this particular tree ? Why Honey, why the insect Locust ( Locust bring to mind....... destruction )...

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Honey Locust is also another tree with long spines (I've seen a few locally that were in excess of six inches) suitable for needles and pins. The wood of that tree is particularly sturdy, so they don't need a whole lot of hardening.

 

 

The Honey Locust is the one I use for thorns, as well. I don't do anything to harden the thorns at all, they are very durable. :devil:

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The fiest thing I would look at is the habitat of the tree, its growing habits and what it likes. And it appears to like water. So otherworld, the dead, dissolving, manifesting, would be worth looking into. I would also look to its root paterns and growing patterns - does it trap things in the roots like the mangroves, or does it just like to grow near water like the willow? Is it a fast grower or a slow grower? How tenacious is it? Does it bend or snap and break? And thorns, protection, and defense and attack. Which it would be better suited to I would take from its growing patterns.

 

M

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