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sarasuperid

How to Teach Yourself

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Nothing to see here... :ninja:

Edited by Wexler

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Thank you SS for the organized list of Trad Witch practices. It is exactly what I was looking for as I'm new to trad-craft & needed some definition. Lists really pull the journey together. These five items are all things I do to some minor extent as part of daily life. It's just how Ive always related. I've learned through experiences, contact with other people and experimenting. I'd started out at 17 with a Ouija board, learned from a trance-channeling medium in my 20's & began working with my spirit guide who has been a good friend, dream-realm teacher & back-seat kibbitzer. He led me to learn about witchcraft & I cast practice circles to learn energy manipulation. I experimented with the Wiccan circle structure by-the-book. When I'd work outdoors I'd physically see blue light sliding towards me across the ground & indoors & out i'd see blue mist surrounding my hands. Not having a clue I figured let it show me what it wanted to do. That led to an interest in trad-craft.

Edited by Zombee

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Oddly enough, sometimes things are obscured...A subject that you should have ran across on the internet or through books escapes your attention and you haven't read the common knowledge. You discover it on your own and work with it. It isn't until you have experience with the subject that you find the written material. 

 

That's a way that your guidance teaches you, because having preconceived ideas impedes your own discoveries. Once you have understanding of the material then you can find the written confirmation and further explanation of what you have uncovered on your own. This validates your experience.

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Six ways, By Aidan Wachter has a similar concept of outlining key skills or specialties that are a part of many peoples effective craftwork. He doesn't mince words, owns his own bullshit and presents technique, not dogma or theistic/stylistically bound methods.

For those who see this thread and want a book to support the development of some key skills, I would recommend it strongly.

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