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Egg Shells


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#1 Michele

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:44 PM

Separating the eggshell from the membrane to make powdered eggshell has always been one of those fiddley little chres for me that I don't relish. I am thinking maybe smeone where who is a cook (CG? lol) can offer an easier way of doing it. I hard boil my eggs first for the simple reason that nothing one ingests is passed straight through and always becomes part of the cell structure of the person so I have this thing about eating that with which I work magicaly to create a stronger bond and connection (just me being weird and territorial, lol).

Anyway, peeling the membrane off the eggshell bit by bit is always a pain in the patootie, anyone know a quicker and easier way to do this?

M

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#2 Aloe

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:48 PM

I may be missing your point, but I never take that membrane off before powdering the eggshells, I just dry it out well by baking the shells first.
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"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#3 Michele

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 01:57 PM

I may be missing your point, but I never take that membrane off before powdering the eggshells, I just dry it out well by baking the shells first.


You may well be correct - I just always take it off becuase I often enclose the eggshells in things I don't want getting moldy, and as I suck at cooking I have this odd paranoia that everything not "bone dry" gets mold. I won't even keep a chocolate bar longer than 3 days (it's a miracle I'm actually trying to make mead, lol). So as long as I let it dry well it won't go moldy? What temp do you bake it at (I can just see me ending up with black egg shells, lol. Anything I cook tends to catch on fire)? It'd be great not to have to deal with trying to remove it every time...

M

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#4 Michele

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:40 PM

OKay - I baked them (350 for 15 minutes) and the eggshell turned brown and bits of the membrane are black. Me and anything even RELATED to an oven just isn't a good mix... :-(
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#5 CelticGypsy

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:42 PM

I think boiling the egg first is a handy idea if you have personal convictions regarding the membrane, Michele. Also, considering the climate you live in, would warrent reservations. Having said that, I'll share an experiance with my Peers. Since Yule, I've been saving egg shells for a working for my land protection. That's alot of shells, filled 2 brown paper grocery bags. Eggs, I just cracked and cooked with, membrane not worried about. These bags sat by the North door, they kinda kept cold this winter.

But I'm in a different climate. When I crushed the eggs with my rolling pin, the membrane wasn't an issue at all, it had hardened and crushed with the shell rather easilly. I didn't find any mold or mildew, but each egg showed me the different aspects. Some had a generous amount of membrane, others did not. The ones that had a lot of membrane, I just ran through some collected rain water, and tossed into the paper sack. Perhaps that little bit of rushing it through the water, helped. I fed my plants and indoor herbs, the membrane water.

Michele, you've always shown me at least, your cautionary side. I believe a Witch should always " go with their gut " on working with nature's simple things like food stuffs. Let's say your............. Flour is "dated".. or just plain OLD, and you don't feel confident in using it to cook with or cast with, or it has become a place where bugs have taken up residence. I don't "throw" it out, I made bisquits for my bird friends.
Pantry items, can be repurposed, for other things, I think. lol !

Regards,
Gypsy

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#6 Aloe

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:49 PM

OKay - I baked them (350 for 15 minutes) and the eggshell turned brown and bits of the membrane are black. Me and anything even RELATED to an oven just isn't a good mix... :-(


I'm trying to find the instructions I used the first time I did it, but can't seem to find them on the net. :-/ I believe I baked them at a much lower temperature for longer, like 200 for 20 minutes or something like that and they turned out great. Sorry yours turned black!

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"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#7 Mountain Witch

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 02:50 PM

M,

Have you thought about putting the shells into a tightly-closed container with a little DampRid ... or several of those little packets of same stuff that comes in pill bottles? A few days with that should dry everything out well, even in your climate.

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#8 o_O

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:09 PM

After I use eggs for cooking, I soak the egg shells in hot soapy water for a little bit and then finish washing them and let them air dry. Then powder them. Never had an issue with the membrane.
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#9 Michele

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:39 PM

Lots of good ideas here... I doon't knw why but when it comes to anything that even can be cooked, I turn to mush, lol.

M

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#10 Oceana's Moon

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 10:40 PM

Just being curious here, as I have not used powdered egg shells in any workings as of yet.... but have read about it being used.

Do they have the chance of becoming 'bad', like any other food item? If so, how long are they kept before being tossed out? Or if becoming 'bad, rotten, what-have-you' can they then be used in hexing... such as a 'rotten egg, bad apple, etc'? Or would the user let the egg go 'bad' before powdering?

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#11 Aloe

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 10:44 PM

Just being curious here, as I have not used powdered egg shells in any workings as of yet.... but have read about it being used.

Do they have the chance of becoming 'bad', like any other food item? If so, how long are they kept before being tossed out? Or if becoming 'bad, rotten, what-have-you' can they then be used in hexing... such as a 'rotten egg, bad apple, etc'? Or would the user let the egg go 'bad' before powdering?


Well like I said I do bake mine and they don't turn black ( ;) Michele), but I found a jar of eggshell the other day that I'd powdered in 2009 and it somehow got shuffled back in the all-but-unreachable corner of the cabinet. I opened it and it's still perfectly good, no mold, rotting, or other ickyness and I do include the membrane. They were stored in a glass jar with a rubber seal lid.

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"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#12 sarasuperid

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 10:44 PM

I have used egg shells in a spirit bottle, as far as I can tell they don't go bad. They are dry bone like matter.
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#13 Michele

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 10:45 PM

Just being curious here, as I have not used powdered egg shells in any workings as of yet.... but have read about it being used.

Do they have the chance of becoming 'bad', like any other food item? If so, how long are they kept before being tossed out? Or if becoming 'bad, rotten, what-have-you' can they then be used in hexing... such as a 'rotten egg, bad apple, etc'? Or would the user let the egg go 'bad' before powdering?


I've always removed the membrane and they haven't gone off... so this is the first time I'll be using them with membrane. We shall see, lol - I'll let ya know if they go bad!

I'm sure they could be used in hexing... possibly even the smell alone could be used in banishing (or at least making unwanted house guests leave, lol)

M

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#14 Oceana's Moon

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 10:49 PM

ooohhhh thank you all... very cool info.
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#15 ejfinch

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 01:28 PM

I happen to like hard-boiled eggs, so that comes in handy. After I peel them, I just lay the shells out on the counter on paper towels for a few days then store them in a bag. I've not had any problems at all.
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#16 Michele

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 02:03 PM

Well mine have been baked, ground up with althea root (however you spell that) and poured on top of cross roads dirt with skeleton keys, frog bones, snail shells, and barks from the forest trees. So what's done is done :-)

Got some grave-yard dirt drying in the toaster oven now (we had a big rain yesterday so the dirt was rather wet). I left the hard-boiled eggs (minus shells lol) and some hot-crossed buns out on the grave. The hot crossed buns were gone in a jiffy but the eggs were still there this morning - it must be true the dead like sweet things, lol.

M

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#17 Michele

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 01:50 AM

Personally I wouldn't use moldy things usless I was doing something that warrented it. Like I wouldn't want to use moldy rose petals in a love spell, but if I was trying to dissipate someone else's love life, I might use moldy rose petals to slow "decay" their relationship over a period of time (rather than one big fight).

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#18 Abhainn

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 02:24 AM

I have some egg shells from a local songbird that I found on a recent scavenge. I think (since they were crushed accidentally) that I'll make them into some egg shell powder. Thanks for the idea!
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#19 Lucea's Child

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 04:35 PM

The only time I usually use eggs is when I'm baking, so I generally rinse the shells in water and then put them in the oven with the baked goods for about 5-10 minutes, or until dry but not discolored. I've never had an issue with the membranes, I've always left them.

Good luck!

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#20 CelticGypsy

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:02 PM

When cracked carefully, egg shells make nice portable cauldrons, to take out to Nature on a hike, to be left in Nature for a working.

Regards,
Gypsy

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" The last thing you wanted a Witch to do is get bored and start making her own amusements, because Witches sometimes have erratically famous ideas about what was amusing "

 

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