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Witchcraft for All by Louise Huebner


Vicky

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This was published in 1969 (then again as Power Through Witchcraft) and is now out of print. It can be downloaded easily and there are a few second hand copies on Amazon. I found it in my attic when I was 15 and it was my first book on witchcraft. Unfortunately a year later it was stolen and it’s taken me until now (17 years later) to get another copy.

 

 

For anyone unfamiliar with Louise Huebner, she was the Official Witch of Los Angeles. It seems to have been bestowed on her as a publicity stunt and when they tried to revoke it she threatened to remove the sexual vitality of the whole of LA. They decided not to call her bluff and let her carry on using it. She is a psychic, astrologer and Witch, coming from a line of Yugoslavian Witches.

 

 

- A brief but sensible history of witchcraft, covering things like the early scientists, superstitions, mass hysteria.

 

 

- Tools of Witchcraft. There’s no mention of wands, athames, stangs, elements, quarters, initiation, dedication rituals. States that tools are not strictly needed although she uses some herself. The most important thing is mental and emotional discipline.

 

 

- Spells and Chants. This is where things get spicy. There’s a Sexual Seduction Spell, a Spice Rub to increase sexual excitement, True Love Tea, and Emotional Bondage Spell where she warns “be careful that you really want him” and then an Unwanted Lover Spell for those “fiery young ladies” who have “too many lovers”. Ethics of these spells are not discussed. She just warns to take responsibility and don’t cry ‘rape’ if it backfires. You can use witchcraft to get what you want but nobody is going to be there holding your hand. There are lots of other little charms and spells (non sex related).

 

 

- The Card Spell. She believes that the Tarot is rubbish and works with playing cards. She provides meanings for all the cards.

 

 

- How to Concoct a New You. Makes you take stock of your life and everything you’ve achieved and possess.

 

 

- Numerology

 

 

- Examples of the letters she’s received from the public and her responses. Many of them involve her telling them they need a lawyer/doctor/psychiatrist rather than a witch. Some replies are amusing, for example someone has sent her a lock of hair so she can cast a spell to win back their lover. She responds that she really doesn’t care about a stranger’s love life but she does suggests some self-help: Head & Shoulders.

 

 

I don’t personally agree with absolutely everything in this book and wouldn’t do some of the spells. The biggest thing I get from this book is her attitude. She’s hardline, no molly-coddling, doesn’t pull her punches. She repeatedly states that witchcraft is powerful and likens it to jumping off a cliff; you can’t just shout ‘stop’ when you’re halfway down because you’ve changed your mind. Her attitude is to take responsibility for what you do and if you get yourself into a mess then you can damn well get yourself out of it. She has no problem with doing spells against someone who is a problem to you. There’s a little spell to make someone move house so you can get rid of them. She states her mother had a “get-rid-of list” and carried out a Goodbye Spell on people she couldn’t stand. As I said, I was very young when I initially got this book. Where the Wicca books left me thinking ‘wow, I can do anything!’, this book left me thinking ‘this is serious stuff, I need to be careful’.

 

 

Hugely interested to hear if anyone else has this book and what you think of it.

Edited by Vicky
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The tarot issue aside, it might be worthwhile to take a gander at it. I always like books that aren't coated in fairy dust.

 

From what I have read of it and seen of her online though it's not coated with fairy dust it is coated with a different kind of dust. Think Laurie Cabot. I posted a video of this woman a week or so ago I think on Vicky's intro thread?

 

Edited to add: to be fair, though, she and Laurie both have useful information. I am coming off far more negative than I mean to.

Edited by Marabet
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Thanks for the review Vicky.

 

Will have to pick it up - will see if I can find it on-line.

 

I have some reservations though given the comment on Tarot. Perhaps she did not have success with Tarot and if so, she then trashes it, which is pretty narrow minded, imo.

 

Tough love witchyness can only take one so far. She's giving the information which, imo, makes her somewhat responsible as well.

 

The sex part sounds as if it is written for women only - although any decent Witch can make this work the other way as well, if they want to.

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Her explanation for the tarot comment is that the meanings have changed too much over the years and that anyone can read whatever they want into them. I don't agree with her view. Things do change over the years, nothing stays static. I had never considered using normal playing cards but it's something I'm going to look into further.

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This is an interesting Post, it seems my Peers are digesting the words, Vicky. Thought provoking to say the least. Personally I would find the chapter on Numerology interesting, as I've experianced the use of numbers or the amounts of numbers are beneficial to my Path/Journey.

 

Regarding the Tarot : I think it wise to own or have a relationship with more than one deck, and incorporate both into a personal reading to get clarity for the Witch, but that's just me.

 

 

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Thank you for the post. While I love my tarot... I would use playing cards if I didn't have them around. I find that even the worst books can bring me inspiration, some word or chant that sparks creativity may be just what I need for something else I am working on. Think I'll give her a shot.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am reading it right now. I have to say for the first 100 pages so far I feel like Louise Huebner is talking down tI the reader.

I agree that we are a product of our decisions and choices. I also agree we will grow and go no where as witches if we live in the state of victim hood. However, her message seems to be just think really hard about what you want constantly and it will come to you. That witchcraft is all about your personal power. Which it is to a point, but I think she is missing the part where you connect your energy to the whole current that runs through everything. That is more important than just power thinking. In my experience the only thing that constantly thinking hard about something goes me is a headache.

Her advice to take inventory of your life, your choices, your belongings, your past, etc is also good advice. However, her while demeanor comes across that witchcraft is more psychological than a real physical experience. Her dismissal of tarot is one thing, but her dismissal of working with spirits and oter entities is ludicrous in my opinion. There are spirits out there that will help you and are real. It isn't some psychological trick that she seems to make it out to be.

I haven't finished the book yet, but I have to say I am coming down on the "going to have to trade it in" side.

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The anti-tarot thing was an instant tip off to me that I didn't want this book. But Ravenflyer, you have totally confirmed it for me. Thanks for the review. That aside however, I am grateful that this book was helpful to someone and brought them into the traditional craft!

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I pretty much felt I could sum her up from Vicky's initial post.

The tarot line was a definite tip, but the other things as well. Though I have nothing against using regular cards. It's all good! The odd thing is, there's so much in common. The four suits of the tarot are analogous to the four suits of the tarot (indeed they have a common ancestry), and much of it - where the 'pip" cards are concerned- is based on numerology, which she also uses, so.. that's just puzzling.. Maybe she places too much emphasis on the major arcana and the PCS imagery?

 

However, just because someone has "attitude" does not somehow endear them to me. She may (or may not) be one of those types who enjoys coming across as a "bitch", but I've never understood that mindset. How many guys swell with pride if someone tells them they're a dickhead? lol

I do agree with her "jumping off a cliff" analogy though. Good advice.

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I didn't even read her spiel about regular playing cards. Mostly because its her version if what each of those cards mean. I have read many different interpretations for the regular playing cards. So her whole point is moot, IMHO.

 

And her advice in places is good. I agree about not playing the victim, and realizing that no one has caused anything in your life but you and then deciding to change that if you aren't happy. It's all good advice, but it's NOT witchcraft. It's psychology. I could have read that in most any self help book.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This book does sound interesting. I've read plenty of books where the author pooh-poohs something (like she does with tarot and spirits, so I understand from your review Ravenflyer), but then is spot on with other subjects. In other words, don't throw out the baby with the bathwater. I'll have to go to Amazon and check this one out and see if her attitude about the unseen ones and tarot affects the rest of her reasoning regarding other subjects too much!

 

:Spider-1:

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Yep it is much more of a psychology book for witches than anything else although I'm not sure you'd find it in any self-help book. I think it depends on your background. I think if you're established in your practice then it's probably not going to offer much, maybe just piss you off and at best provide an amusing insight into the 1960s. For me, my brain was getting saturated with the fluffy stuff and it was just what I needed. I came across a vlog on youtube that was saying many modern pagans are losing a respect and awe for the spirit world, which I do agree with, with some people I've seen (not here, elsewhere, obviously). I'm not sure Louise Huebner demonstrates a 'respect and awe' but she does strongly emphasise that this isn't a game.

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  • 1 year later...

I just began reading this book. I like her attitude, I disagree with an earlier poster that she seems like she is talking down to people. But I can see how her tone comes off as a little combative.

 

I disagree with almost all of her magical theory. She presents contradictory ideas at different times in the book. For example, she says that some witches prefer to cast nude or clothed, and this makes absolutely no difference in magic. Later, she gives a spell and says the witch must be nude or the spell will not work. Or, witchcraft is more than positive thinking and has real power, but that hexes can be easily broken with positive thinking. The book is filled with plenty of magical ideas that do not sound like traditional craft to me, such as:

  • When a witch uses ingredients in spells (including herbs and tools) they are just props, and "self-confident" witches don't need these things to work powerful magic.
  • No items, man-made or natural, have intrinsic magic. Herbs, trees, stones, et cetera, have no magical properties, they should just be used as props to reinforce your self-confidence. In addition, any item can be used in any way a witch sees fit, regardless of traditional correspondence (near the end of the book, she says that the items listed in the rituals must be used exactly with no substitutions or else the spells will not work).
  • When it comes to spells, a witch should "play it very loose" because witches cannot accurately spell for specific outcomes.
  • Witchcraft is almost all head-games; magic only alters people's subconscious and not their environment.
  • New witches should not try to write their own spells until they are very experienced.
  • All non-spirits are just emotional vibrations from people, but ghosts do exist.

Apparently regardless of her thoughts about props and correspondences, all of the rituals and spells in her book has an extremely specific list of ingredients and planetary correspondences. She goes on to state factually several correspondences such as colors, dates, and times, even though she just spent several pages saying these things are meaningless. Some of the information she shares I find to be outright bizarre, such as that "orange-red" candles are best for sex magic, but that pure red candles are "primitive" and should only be used by "very powerful" witches, because new witches will be unable to control any magic with a pure red candle involved. Right after she claims tarot is ridiculous nonsense, she says that playing cards were originally only used for magic (I may be misinformed, but I believe playing cards were originally invented by people to play games, regardless of how quickly mystics picked them up to divine).

 

At the same time, there are some things she says about being a witch that make a lot of sense to me, and that I agree with fully. Her concepts of personal power really resonate with me at this time. I have noticed some of her ideas are echoed in Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson, which a lot of people on TW seem to think well of. She seems to have very traditional ethics and values, and I found a lot of parallels between her beliefs on how magic should be used, and many beliefs shared on TW.

 

I suspect that the book was influenced a lot by its time. It does heavily emphasize sex and lust, but it was also written in 1969. I get the feeling that Mrs. Huebner might actually be very traditional, but gave her book very strong New Age overtones to help it sell. Most of her contradictions seem to stem from her believing one thing, but promoting New Age ideals in her book instead.

 

Despite all of the confusing, contradictory, and nonsensical information given about magical theory, I liked the book a lot and I would recommend it to anyone interested in a traditional path. This is because of her steadfast and virulent belief that witchcraft is for the self, done with personal power, to affect changes that the witch wants in her own life. She unabashedly speaks about the intense feelings of power and even superiority that witches should feel and the delight of being able to alter reality to your will. If people are inconvenienced or even negatively affected by the magic she does for herself, oh well and too bad for them. I don't think that all of this is how "real" witches should feel. However, for new practitioners, I think it is an important mindset to be exposed to. I know that when I first started on my research, all I could find were books that made witches look like nuns of nature, all humble and delicate and simple-living. Online, all I could find were forums full of "witches" who did not even believe in the power of magic (I have seen more than one person say something along the lines of, "...don't worry, I'm not crazy. I know my spell won't actually change anything. I just want to feel better about this situation."). Being surrounded by this was a huge detriment to my path. Mrs. Huebner, on the other hand, advocates using magic to get whatever luxuries you want and warns that it's real and will be a kick in the ass if you can't handle it. I think this book could be very valuable to someone starting their path later in life, both to present a different point of view regarding magical ethics, and to help someone hone their bullshit detector when it comes to incorrect information.

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