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The Exile

Monica English (1920-1979)

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Well, the Nazis are pretty interesting; especially the whole pagan revival side that Savitri Devi focusses on. There were some on the Allied side who ascribed their early victories to a comparatively egalitarian structure within the army and the improved morale that led to. Surprising perhaps. Savitri's writings are fascinating as a view of what made an intelligent highly ethical Nazi tick.....fascinating and disturbing of course. She wasn't some kind of Nazi-lite, a Strasserite or whatever, she was very much the real article. The prominent Nazi Rosenberg has been claimed to be a disciple of Gurdjieff, a teacher of whose work I am fond, and an unconfirmed rumour has it that it was Gurdjieff who suggested that the swastika might be a good symbol for the Nazis. Gurdjieff however had Jews among his disciples and for other reasons also was clearly no Nazi. Still, it is too easily forgotten that the Nazis were not particularly isolated in their views before the second world war.

 

I've sometimes thought that people can be divided into natural "Shiva" people and natural "Vishnu" people; I am on the Shiva side myself. I'm a little comforted to see that Savitri Devi was on the Vishnu side!

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Was checking the British Newspaper Archive for any new material that might of been added since the last time I checked.

 

Found a small article that mentioned Monica English's first husband in which letters of administration was granted to his wife.

 

 

 

Gloucestershire Echo - Wednesday 12 June 1946

 

Mr. J. S. DAVIS

 

Mr. John Summersell Davis, of Sligo House, Pittville, Cheltenham, who died on November 6th last, aged 34 years, intestate, left £1,754, with net personality £1,249.  Letters of administration have been granted to his widow, Mrs. Monica M. Davis, of Charlton House, Hartlebury, Worcs.

 

 

 

 

So now we have another location of where Monica English lived.  Wonder why she lived at the Charlton House in Hartlebury, Worcestershire in 1946?

 

She still had the property at Cheltenham until it being sold of in 1948.

 

So got to do more checking around.

 

.

 

 

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Monica English's coven is said to go back either 200 years or to Saxon times, according to the Cauldron article no longer online.

 

200 years is quite credible. It takes us back to when Sir Andrew Fountaine built Narford Hall. He was a cultured man who might easily be imagined as founding or re-founding or protecting or being associated with an esoteric group. It also takes us back to the end of the major witchcraft persecition. Witchcraft had ceased to be a capital offence with the Witchcraft Act of 1735 by which time no-one had been hanged for witchcraft in England since 1719. So setting up a formal witchcraft group had then become relatively safe.

 

Back to Saxon times? The clue here I think lies in the claim that the English coven worshipped the horse goddess Epona, equated with chthonic Demeter. (I don't know if that is in Michael Howard's recent book, but the claim has circulated privately anyway). Horse worship has a long history in the area, actually going back before Saxon times to the Celtic Iceni, Boudicca and all that. And of course the area was dense with Toadmen etc, whether or not there was a continous horse-magic orgaization in the area there was certainly a long standing culture associated with horse magic. Now, here is an interesting point. The connection of ostensible "witchcraft" with folk Catholicism has often been made. Now, it is a fact that in the early part of the 20th century the Catholic Church in Norfolk was closely associated with the farm workers union, which would have brought them into contact with Toadmen and the like; and there seems to have been some Catholicism in the Fountaine family too, I dug up a few references to it online. There are old aristocratic Catholic families in Norfolk. Howard mentions that a catholic priest was associated with the English coven and also that a local aristocratic couple served as its patrons.....(I'm referring to the artcle from memory).

 

The Catholic connection really needs to be looked at.

Edited by froglover

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Dropping past after an absence of I think a few years, hi people!
 

Just clarifying that yes Michael Howard in "Children of Cain" page 235 does put in print his information that Monica English's group worshipped the ancient horse goddess Epona. It may or may not be significant that there had been information on Epona in an article in Folklore about 1955.

 

Howard describes the ritual of the group in a way that makes them sound to my mind a bit like Mevlevis, "Whirling Dervishes", that may be a completely false impression of course. But Fountaine was apparently a travelled man.

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Dropping past after an absence of I think a few years, hi people!

 

 

Good to see you, Froglover.

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Perhaps It wasn't Epona though and Howard assumed that facet (Epona wasn't a Saxon goddess).
Settlement myths of the early Anglo-Saxons tell us that two semi-divine twins named Hengst and Horsa are credited with leading the Angles, Jutes, and Saxons to what is modern-day Kent and East Anglia. In the myths, Horsa was killed fighting the Britons whereas Hengst became the first 'King' of the Saxons. Very telling, and quite a familiar myth in comparison. 

Edited by Volundr

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