Jump to content

Anne Boleyn was not a witch


anjeaunot

Recommended Posts

For this post I rely heavily on The Rise and Fall of Anne Boleyn by Retha N Warnicke. (Cambridge University Press 1989)

 

The lives of the Kings and Queens of England edited by Antonia Fraser(Weidenfeld and Nicolson, London 1975) was also helpful.

 

Retha N Warnicke explains why charges of witchcraft were levelled at Queen Anne Boleyn, the mother of Elizabeth I, and mother of Elizabeth I, and who initiated them. She then successfully rebuts these changes.

 

Most derogatory reports emanated from two hostile witnesses with vested interests.

 

Eustace Chapuys, Charles V’s Imperial Ambassador, attempted to prevent Henry VIII from divorcing Catherine of Aragon.

 

Chapuys viewed Anne Boleyn as an evil woman who “used witchcraft to manipulate and control the king” (page 3).

 

Subsequently, Nicholas Sander, a Catholic priest who worked actively against Queen Elizabeth, assured his readers that Anne Boleyn had the monstrous appearance of a witch: “a tumour on her neck and a sixth finger on her right hand.”

 

Warnicke points out that such an ugly creature could not have captivated Henry VIII.

 

The Venetian Ambassador saw Anne in 1532. He described her as of medium height, very swarthy with black and beautiful eyes. Both the Venetian Ambassador and Eustace Chapuys were implacably hostile to Anne Boleyn, yet neither man mentioned any physical deformity.

 

Warnicke stresses that Anne was engaged to Henry Percy, heir to the Earl of Northumberland in 1523. Henry would not have proposed if Anne had a physical deformity. Contemporary Europeans viewed people with physical handicaps as monsters!

 

Henry VIII terminated Anne’s engagement to the Percy heir for dynastic purpose. It was decided that a marriage between the daughter of the Earl of Shrewsbury and the son of the Earl of Northumberland would better strengthen the north against incursions by the Scots.

 

Warnicke is confident that Mary Boleyn, Anne’s sister, had a sexual relationship with Henry VIII. Rumours surrounded the birth of her son, Henry Carey. He was long believed to have been fathered by Henry VIII.

 

Nicholas Sander improved on these rumours. Anne Boleyn was the bastard daughter of Henry VIII, who had enjoyed a sexual liaison with her mother. Therefore, Anne Boleyn had married her father! (page 244)

 

Encouraged by his flights of fantasy, Sander alleged that Anne Boleyn was packed off to France because she was enjoying sexual relationships with both her father’s butler, and with his chaplain.

 

Warnicke dismisses these charges as ludicrous. Anne reached the Netherlands at the age of seven, and then went to the Royal nursery in France. She did not set foot in England again until 1521.

 

A further objection to Sander’s fantastic claims is the fact that Anne Boleyn joined the Habsburg children at the royal court and lived in their schoolroom. She also joined the French nursery and lived with Louis XII’s four-year old daughter Renee. Anne would subsequently be appointed maid-of-honour to Queen Claude, and an attendant in the household of the Duchess of Alencon.

 

Warnicke stresses that Anne would have been ostracized by both peers and superiors if she had six fingers on the right hand!

 

Nicholas Sander’s claims must be viewed in the light of his attempts to discredit Queen Elizabeth. Sander was committed to restoring the Catholic faith in England. He died in 1581 after spending two years in Ireland attempting to foment rebellion against the protestant Queen Elizabeth.

 

Anne Boleyn was accused of witchcraft because she bore a defective foetus in 1536. King Henry VIII was not prepared to admit that he had sired a defective foetus; and Jane Seymour was waiting in the wings. (Henry VIII married Jane Seymour only days after Anne’s execution).

 

Henry VIII and his ministers used witchcraft as the pretext to execute Anne Boleyn. It was more expedient to claim that a lover had fathered the foetal monstrosity.

 

Popular opinion held that witches could not bear healthy children, poisoned enemies, had many lovers, inflicted impotence on men, and indulged in incest and sodomy.

 

Accordingly, Henry VIII accused Anne of trying to poison his elder daughter Mary and his illegitimate son the Duke of Richmond. He claimed she had made him impotent.

 

Anne’s alleged lovers included her own brother and several suspected sodomites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

isnt it quite typical in that era and many more that rather than a person take responsibility for their own misfortune, sin/wrongdoing; instead they would blame it on witchcraft. however when they needed something and their christianity wouldn't answer they would come to a witch for help. This is no surprise to me. Even modern day churches still blame "witchcraft" for that in which they cannot control. IDIOTS

 

I have always respected Anne Boelyn. And I never thought her to be a witch. A monstrous creature because of a sixth finger and growth on her neck. ok? even so...does that make one unloveable?or a witch? nope. once again, IDIOTS and that's putting nicely.

 

LONG LIVE THE QUEEN!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

isnt it quite typical in that era and many more that rather than a person take responsibility for their own misfortune, sin/wrongdoing; instead they would blame it on witchcraft. however when they needed something and their christianity wouldn't answer they would come to a witch for help. This is no surprise to me. Even modern day churches still blame "witchcraft" for that in which they cannot control. IDIOTS

 

I have always respected Anne Boelyn. And I never thought her to be a witch. A monstrous creature because of a sixth finger and growth on her neck. ok? even so...does that make one unloveable?or a witch? nope. once again, IDIOTS and that's putting nicely.

 

LONG LIVE THE QUEEN!

 

I've always felt bad for her, really. Could she really help how she was made? No, stupid Middle Age morons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...