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The retrieving and cleaning of bones from roadkill


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#41 Solanaceae

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:23 PM

I actually looked into this, we Canadians can buy human bones if you are in med school, a doctor or a nurse. If you know anyone in these professions, you could always ask them to get it for you. Mind you in some cases the company selling the bones will ask for proof of what the bones are required for. Also you will pay a pretty penny for them. Maybe grave robbing is the way to go if you want it bad enough after all.


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#42 Chloe

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:49 PM

Great info! This will be really useful come the end of August. I have a baby fox I'll be digging up and it's the first time I've ever tried anything like this. Found the poor thing laying dead outside in the backyard of my parent's house, so it was a good opportunity to give something like this a try. It's been buried for over 3 months now but with how cold it's been, I'm thinking I'll have to wait till the end of summer for it to have fully decomposed. I would like to at least be able to get it done during the summer break though... Can't wait! I've always been really drawn to foxes so I'm overly excited about having a fox skull lol.
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#43 Apryl

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:57 PM

Thank you, Aloe! I was thinking the same thing.  :thumbsup:

 

Certain states here (in the US) prohibit the buying and/or shipping of human bones across their borders (but not possession of?)...I want to say Tennessee may be one of them. Maybe RavenFlyer will remember, (or another member with a better memory than mine). Either way, there's a thread where this was mentioned. I suck at adding links but I want to say it was titled "human mala beads", in case anyone was considering searching for that thread and/or for making purchases from The Bone Room. Very cool website, BTW. 

 

 

I like Athena's method too. Cornmeal? I didn't realize it was such an effective desiccant! I have different types of salt around but I like the idea of the cornmeal. Does this work for larger creatures as well? Bird wings and feet don't have a lot of flesh to them, not the little ones my kitty brings me, anyway. The bury and wait method isn't always feasible, either, due to my dogs. Anyway, she brings us baby snakes in the summer. Could I dry them in cornmeal, maybe in the attic (hottest and driest spot in the house) rather than bury?  

 

Edit to say that for my purposes, I need the snake intact but shriveled up. If I'm lucky enough for another, it would be dissected and the bones harvested for something entirely different.   


Edited by Apryl, 30 January 2014 - 12:04 AM.

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#44 RavenFlyer

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 01:17 AM

Thank you, Aloe! I was thinking the same thing.  :thumbsup:
 
Certain states here (in the US) prohibit the buying and/or shipping of human bones across their borders (but not possession of?)...I want to say Tennessee may be one of them. Maybe RavenFlyer will remember, (or another member with a better memory than mine). Either way, there's a thread where this was mentioned. I suck at adding links but I want to say it was titled "human mala beads", in case anyone was considering searching for that thread and/or for making purchases from The Bone Room. Very cool website, BTW. 
 
 


Yes Tennessee is a state that you can possess human remains and bones but can not have them shipped in. Here is a link to a FAQ of a shop that sells human bones explaining some of the laws

http://realhumanskul...kulls.html#2681

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#45 Apryl

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:47 PM

Thanks RF


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#46 Wexler

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:19 AM

This seems a good a thread as any to ask -

 

Are dried, cleaned bones easily damaged by heat? I want to put a lit tea light on a skull and let the tea light burn down. I don't feel as if that would harm the skull, but I thought it couldn't hurt to ask.


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#47 Autumn Moon

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:54 AM

Yes they are. It dries them out and makes them brittle. After a while they start to fall apart. 

 

You could a non-oil based sealing coat on them, which would help it not to dry out (oil would make the bone soft, fungus would start, and good bye bone).


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#48 Wexler

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:55 AM

Yes they are. It dries them out and makes them brittle. After a while they start to fall apart. 

 

You could a non-oil based sealing coat on them, which would help it not to dry out (oil would make the bone soft, fungus would start, and good bye bone).

Thank you!


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#49 Autumn Moon

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 03:02 AM

You're welcome.


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#50 Ravenshaw

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 03:57 AM

For dermestid beetles, check your local university. Feed them meal worms until they're older then chuck the skull in (clean bigger stuff off), check daily.


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#51 Autumn Moon

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:08 PM

I like to bury it where it won't be scavenged by animals, and forget about it. Bacteria and many other critters will do the job. Then it's hydrogen peroxide time. That way, not much smelly, and is a good way to handle larger skulls. One could speed it up by first taking as much of the flesh off as you can, but I don't like doing that sort of thing.


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#52 Michele

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:30 PM

I don't remember if ti was this thread or not (and I'm too lazy to read back through the entire thing, lol), but I've used the suggested way of placing the animal body (or parts) in a large cheap collander, and just burying that. Earth gets fed, bones get nicely cleaned, and when I dig it up I can easily find them all still in the collendar. So to whoever originally posted that idea, it works great, thanks....

 

M


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#53 Horne

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 01:45 AM

There's a pigeon buried in my garden since last spring, intending to dig her up and use her skull coming next midwinter. The bird flew itself to death against a wall when me and my friend were standing by and I took her with me, later use in mind.


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#54 Horne

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 08:38 PM

Damn, not a single one is challenging me to take and use some of their parts... been taking corpses of ducks, rats and fish out of the local waters to prevent them from infesting the place for the last one and a half weeks or so, botulism and sewer overflow being the combined cause of animal demise lately. I'd rather see the creatures live anyway.


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#55 Horne

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 04:32 PM

Funny how what I call "natural selection" works when it comes to encountering dead animals or parts of them and deciding whether to take them or not. On my way home I saw half a pigeon, probably hit by traffic somehow, and I was tempted to take it with me, but something stopped me, it didn't feel right. Then, doing some work in my backyard about an hour later, I found the remains of a young sparrow which I must have overlooked for months as it had already decayed to a great extent. I am very pleased with this find, as it spoke volumes to me right from the start.


Edited by Horne, 18 September 2014 - 10:53 PM.

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#56 Horne

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Posted 05 October 2014 - 09:09 PM

There's a pigeon buried in my garden since last spring, intending to dig her up and use her skull coming next midwinter. The bird flew itself to death against a wall when me and my friend were standing by and I took her with me, later use in mind.

 

...................

 

It just dawned on me, as the housing company I rent my place from is having my garden redeveloped really soon, it's time to dig up the pigeon asafp!


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#57 Atehequa

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 11:48 PM

Thanks for the useful information regarding roadkill. 

 

 

I've retrieved or extracted a few animal bones in my time, mostly roadkill hawks. Pipe stem mouthpieces and whistles from the leg bones along with feathers, feet(mummified) and talons. 

 

I've skinned a few road killed snakes, mostly for hatbands. They can be tanned or preserved by rubbing glycerin into them. A good source for glycerin is the body ointment Bengay. Good for copperhead and rattler skins.

 

Pipe stem mouthpiece fashioned from red tail hawk bone 

 

Attached File  ru0i1d (1).jpg   65.11KB   0 downloads

 


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#58 Horne

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Posted 18 October 2014 - 05:26 PM

Check out this kid, he's got an amazing blog: http://www.jakes-bon...imal-bones.html


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#59 aphrodite

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 01:24 AM

Great ideas, thanks, I confess to retrieving quite a few racoon penis bones, they are traditional to use and a few bat skulls, but your alls ways seem more hygenic than the rather messy ways i've had to use before. Will try some of these.
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#60 bewitchingredhead

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Posted 13 June 2015 - 11:49 PM

My crows feathers have an odor to them that's not unbearable, but def undesirable. Is there anything I can do to help remove the unpleasant odor from them?
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