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The retrieving and cleaning of bones from roadkill


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#21 Autumn Moon

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:27 PM

In the suburb I live in any carrion that the raccoons, coyotes and bears can smell will be gone on the first night so I am pretty much forced to resort to resomation. I don't think my wife would appreciate it if I brought the remains inside before it was odourless!

Attached is a pic of a bear skull I prepared using the KOH method, a large specimen like this can take a lot of time to clean by natural decomposition or even in a container populated with carrion beetles. The sinus tissues are particularly slow to get rid of without chemical assistance. I hope the picture attachment works, I am doing this on my iPad and having difficulty uploading.


Nice job. We must have well fed bears,coyotes and raccoons, because they didn't bother with my dead crow at all. On a hot day, the plastic box with sand that was in did smell kinda rank, but it was near the garbage cans, so no one would know. I can understand using some additional cleaning methods for a larger animal, but if one is patient, the same can be achieved without the method you mentioned. It is good information to have, but I don't think I would want the danger of working with those chemicals and processes. But that's just me!

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#22 Autumn Moon

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:29 PM

Thank you, Autumn Moon, for the tip about the feathers.

Jevne


You're welcome Jevne.

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#23 CelticGypsy

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:22 PM

I never learned that in Uni Bio - not even pre-med bio.

Personally, I would just bury the sucker in a plastic container with light weight sand, wet it down daily, and wait. Obviously, this works best when the weather is hot. This is what worked for the crow I found. When all the tissues were gone (about a month) (oh yes, defeather first), I soaked the bones in hydrogen peroxide to disinfect them and whiten them. Check the bones daily and when white enough, remove from the solution so as not to make the bones too brittle.



I am wondering Autumn Moon, or anybody that would care to weigh in on this : " as not to make the bones too brittle "

Couldn't one just apply vitamin E oil, on the bones to keep them supple and not so brittle ? I did this on my Crow's feet, (the BIRD not my EYES !!!)... ( lolol !)

with a Q-tip, and they turned out rather nice, I was thinking about doing that to the Owl's talons ... I've not had any issues using vitamin E oil, I picked up at the

drug store.....


Regards,
Gypsy

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#24 aurora

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 06:29 PM

I havent done that CG but i can see the benefits to it, good tip.
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#25 DarqsAngel

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 06:43 PM

Vit E is ideal for skin but bone becomes brittle through mineral loss. That is accelerated in Hydrogen Peroxide due to the porous nature of bone (don't ever use in the mouth regardless of what the bottle says btw, it ruins teeth for the same reason). I know that bone used to be preserved using bees wax but that will turn them brown. I have read about sealants that are designed for bone preservation on the www, but they would most likely be chemical compounds made in a lab. Still I believe there pretty easy to get. Maybe someone else has specifics on that. Or even some recipes for making them???
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#26 Autumn Moon

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 09:12 PM

I am wondering Autumn Moon, or anybody that would care to weigh in on this : " as not to make the bones too brittle "

Couldn't one just apply vitamin E oil, on the bones to keep them supple and not so brittle ? I did this on my Crow's feet, (the BIRD not my EYES !!!)... ( lolol !)

with a Q-tip, and they turned out rather nice, I was thinking about doing that to the Owl's talons ... I've not had any issues using vitamin E oil, I picked up at the

drug store.....


Regards,
Gypsy


Don't know about oil CelticGypsy, but it may make the bones start to decay and go soft. If I find something on this I'll post it here.

ETA: thought about this more. I am pretty sure it would make the bones soft and rot, because the hydrogen peroxide basically de-fats and dries out the bone and marrow. The dryness of the bone is what helps to preserve it. One might use a oil free varnish to soak the bones in to give it hardness, but I would have to check this out.

Edited by Autumn Moon, 14 December 2012 - 09:48 PM.

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#27 RedDragon

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 01:13 AM

I would suggest an epoxy or polyurethane satin floor finish. They will seal the bone and create a strong transparent non-reactive finish.
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#28 CelticGypsy

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:24 AM

Vit E is ideal for skin but bone becomes brittle through mineral loss. That is accelerated in Hydrogen Peroxide due to the porous nature of bone (don't ever use in the mouth regardless of what the bottle says btw, it ruins teeth for the same reason). I know that bone used to be preserved using bees wax but that will turn them brown. I have read about sealants that are designed for bone preservation on the www, but they would most likely be chemical compounds made in a lab. Still I believe there pretty easy to get. Maybe someone else has specifics on that. Or even some recipes for making them???



Don't know about oil CelticGypsy, but it may make the bones start to decay and go soft. If I find something on this I'll post it here.

ETA: thought about this more. I am pretty sure it would make the bones soft and rot, because the hydrogen peroxide basically de-fats and dries out the bone and marrow. The dryness of the bone is what helps to preserve it. One might use a oil free varnish to soak the bones in to give it hardness, but I would have to check this out.



Thanks for weighing in on this, from what I did with my Crow, I could only save feathers and the feet, with the feet I placed in salt, and then used the Vitamin E oil on the skin attached, and that really worked well, just offering up what I've done. You've all seen my post on the Owl, I have feathers and her talons they are in salt, and since I had such success with Vitamin E oil, I would use that also. I've buried her in to collect bones later. I'm waiting for a prompting as to what to do with the feet of both birds. I may just bring out my pendulum for this .

Thank you for your insight, I very much appreciate it.

Regards,
Gypsy

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#29 Jevne

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 02:36 PM

I would suggest an epoxy or polyurethane satin floor finish. They will seal the bone and create a strong transparent non-reactive finish.


I was thinking, since some of your references require the use of chemicals, would you please provide appropriate text or website references, so that those of us who are not familiar with the use of these agents can take the necessary precautions. While this is not a teaching website, we still want to protect our members and, in this case, the general public.

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#30 Autumn Moon

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 02:58 PM

Thanks for weighing in on this, from what I did with my Crow, I could only save feathers and the feet, with the feet I placed in salt, and then used the Vitamin E oil on the skin attached, and that really worked well, just offering up what I've done. You've all seen my post on the Owl, I have feathers and her talons they are in salt, and since I had such success with Vitamin E oil, I would use that also. I've buried her in to collect bones later. I'm waiting for a prompting as to what to do with the feet of both birds. I may just bring out my pendulum for this .

Thank you for your insight, I very much appreciate it.

Regards,
Gypsy


Regarding feet, once dried in salt, the skin becomes like leather, but if exposed to moisture, they will rot very quickly. So CleticGypsy, your idea of Vit E oil was great because it is like oiling leather to preserve it and make it pliable. The bone inside the leather like encasing skin would stay okay because they are protected by the moisture barrier now leather skin.

I know you didn't direct this at me Jevne, but I thought this might be applicable - http://www.biopaints...s-hard-varnish/

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#31 RedDragon

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 03:17 AM

In regard to the post asking for references that is why I suggested the human resources who are familiar with the proper protocols for lab work. These are chemicals that should be treated with respect and with the requisite level of knowledge.

Some web resources on the different methodologies for skeletal preparation are:
http://www.envarch.n...davis-payne.pdf
http://dasnetgroup.c.../July/13-17.pdf
http://www.scielo.cl...v30n2/art11.pdf
http://www.doeni.gov...factsheet10.pdf
http://www.hidetanni...llCleaning.html
http://www.alnmag.co...rolysis-process

Better resources are the following academic papers but they are fairly technical and will have to be accessed through a large library or academic institution:

Adams, J. M. 1980. Osteological preparation techniques II. Guild of Taxidermists no. 5.

Adams, J. M. 1986. Articulating a badger skeleton. Guild of Taxidermists no. 15:12-23.

Allen, E. R., and W. T. Neill. 1950. Cleaning mammal skeletons with meal worms. Journal of Mammalogy, 31:464.

Anonymous. 1931. How to make skeletons. Turtox Service Leaflet no. 9. 2 pp.

Anonymous. 1962. A method for skeleton preparation. Carolina Biological Supply Co., Burlington, North Carolina. 19 pp.

Anonymous. 1983. The preparation of osteological specimens. Guild of Taxidermists no. 11.

Applegarth, J. S. 1977. How to prepare an articulated snake skeleton. Colorado Herpetologist, 3(1):6-10.

Banta, B. H. 1961. The use of clothes moth larvae (Lepidoptera: Tineidae) to prepare osteological specimens, with an annotated bibliography on the use of other arthropods for vertebrate skeletal preparation. Wasmann Journal of Biology (London), 19:265-268.

Barlett, L. M. 1961. Dermestids killed when feeding on skeletons of birds killed by organic insecticides. Wilson Bulletin, 73(2):207.

Berger, A. J. 1955. Suggestions regarding alcoholic specimens and skeletons of birds. Auk, 72:300-303.

Bolin, R. L. 1935. A method of preparing skeletons of small vertebrates. Science, 82(2132):446.

Bond, R. M. 1939. The care of skulls and skeletons of small mammals. Science, 89:324.

Borrell, A. E. 1938. Cleaning small collections of skulls and skeletons with dermestid beetles. Journal of Mammalogy, 19:102-103.

Brown, J. C., and G. I. Twigg. 1967. The rapid cleaning of bones in quantity. Journal of Zoology, London, 153:566-567.

Case, L. D. 1959. Preparing mummified specimens for cleaning by dermestid beetles. Journal of Mammalogy, 40:620.

Chapman, D. I., and N. Chapman. 1969. The use of sodium perborate tetrahydrate (NaBO3.4 H2O) in the preparation of mammalian skeletons. Journal of Zoology, 159:522-523.

Coleman, E. J., and J. R. Zbijewska. 1968. Defleshing of skulls by beetles. Turtox News, 46(7):204-205.

Coy, J. 1980. Osteological preparation techniques I. Guild of Taxidermists no. 5.

Crosbie, J. 1959. Preparation for the mounting of the skeleton of a small mammal. Journal of Science and Technology, 5(1):pages unknown.

Cumbaa, S. L. 1983. Osteological preparation techniques used by the zooarchaeological identification center. Pp. 29-35, in Proceedings of 1981 Workshop on Care and Maintenance of Natural History Collections (D. J. Faber, ed.), Syllogeus no. 44, National Museums of Canada, Ottawa. 196 pp.

de la Torre, L. 1951. A method for cleaning skulls of specimens preserved in alcohol. Journal of Mammalogy, 32:231-232.

Egerton, C. P. 1968. Method for the preparation and preservation of articulated skeletons. Turtox News, 46(5):156-157.

Eyton, T. C. 1859. On the different methods of preparing natural skeletons of birds. Ibis, 1:55-57.

Feduccia, J. A. 1971. A rapid method for the preparation of avian skeletal material. Texas Journal of Science, 23(1):147-148.

Finlayson, H. H. 1932. A simple apparatus for degreasing bones for museum purposes. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, 56:172-174.

Fisher, C., and G. McInnes. 1980. Preparing bones the Scouse way. Association of Environmental Archaeologists Newsletter, 5:5-6.

Fisher, C., and G. McInnes. 1981. An enzyme technique for the rapid preparation of osteological specimens. Biology Curator's Group Newsletter, 2(9):408-410.

Flower, W. H. 1877. On the preparation of skeletons for museum purposes. Zoologist (3rd series), 1:465-468.

Friedman, E. 1973. Preparation of faunal specimens. American Antiquity, 38:113-114.

Gantert, R. L. 1967. The preparation of skeletal mounts. American Biology Teacher, 29(7):531-534.

Gennaro, A. L., and T. J. Salb. 1972. An outdoor enclosure for dermestid defleshing operations. Southwestern Naturalist, 17:95-96.

Gilbert, B. M., L. D. Martin, and H. G. Savage. 1981. Avian osteology. Published by author, Laramie, Wyoming.

Green, H. L. H. H. 1934. A rapid method of preparing clean bone specimens from fresh or fixed material. Anatomical Record, 61:1-3.

Gross, J. E., and B. L. Gross. 1960. Jackrabbit humeri cleaned with Clorox. Journal of Wildlife Management, 30:212.

Hall, E. R., and W. C. Russell. 1933. Dermestid beetles as an aid in cleaning bones. Journal of Mammalogy, 14:372-374.

Hamon, J. H. 1964. The technique of preparing bird skeletons for study by maceration. American Biology Teacher, 26:428-431.

Hardy, R. 1945. Dermestid beetles for cleaning skulls and skeletons in small quantities. Turtox News, 23(4):69-70.

Harris, R. H. 1951. The use of enzymes in the osteological preparation of the emperor penguin. Museums Journal, 51:97.

Harris, R. H. 1959. Small vertebrate skeletons. Museums Journal, 58:223-224.

Hildebrand, M. 1968. Anatomical preparations. University of California Press, Berkeley, California. viii + 100 pp.

Hill, F. C. 1975. Techniques for skeletonizing vertebrates. American Antiquity, 40(2):215-219.

Hiller, A. 1969. An alternative method of bone preparation. Kalori, Journal of the Museums Association of Australia, 36:35.

Hoffman, A. C. 1939. A new method of mounting skeletons. South African Museums Association Bulletin, 2(1):9-12.

Hoffmeister, D. F., and M. R. Lee. 1963. Cleaning mammalian skulls with ammonium hydroxide. Journal of Mammalogy, 44(2):283-284.

Holden, F. H. 1914. A method of cleaning skulls and disarticulated skeletons. Condor, 16:239-241.

Holden, F. H. 1916. Cleaning skulls and skeletons: A supplementary note. Condor, 18:231.

Hooper, E. T. 1950. Use of dermestid beetles instead of cooking pots. Journal of Mammalogy, 31:100-102.

Hooper, E. T. 1956. Selection of fats by dermestid beetles. Journal of Mammalogy, 37:125-126.

Howell, A. B. 1919. An easy method of cleaning skulls. Journal of Mammalogy, 1(1):40-41.

Howell, A. B. 1920. A supplementary note on cleaning skulls. Journal of Mammalogy, 1(3):145.

Hubbel, G. 1958. The preparation of reptile skulls. Journal of the Ohio Herpetological Society, 1:15-17.

Hurlin, R. G. 1918. A note on the preparation of skeletons by bacterial digestion. Science, 47:22-23.

Iverson, S. L., and R. W. Seabloom. 1963. A rapid method for cleaning small mammal skulls. Proceedings of the North Dakota Academy of Sciences, 17:101-103.

Jakway, G. E., W. Raskin, and T. Tytle. 1970. Sodium perborate process for preparation of skeletons. Turtox News, 48:65-67.

Jannett, F. J., Jr., and J. G. Davies. 1989. An inexpensive apparatus for degreasing skulls. Curator, 32(2):88-90.

Jenne, E. A. 1974. Preparation of ligamental snake skeletons. Utah Herpetologists League Journal, 1:9-16.

Kerchoff, O. C. 1934. Maceration and degreasing. Museum News, 12:18.

Kirchoff, O. C. 1934. The making of small ligamentary skeletons. Museum News, 12(2):8.

Klein, R. 1964. Preparation of monkey skeletons using the dermestid beetle technique. American Biology Teacher, 26:426-427.

Konnerth, A. 1965. Preparation of ligamentary articulated fish skeletons. Curator, 8(4):325-332.

Kruse, W. A. R. 1946. How to make skeletons. Ward's Service Bulletin, 1:pages unknown.

Kung, K. 1988. A new preservation method for juvenile mammal skulls and bird skeletons. Guild of Taxidermists no. 18:6.

Laurie, E. M. O., and J. E. Hill. 1951. Use of dermestid beetles for cleaning mammalian skeletons. Museums Journal, 51:206-207.

Lucas, F. A. 1891. Notes on the preparation of rough skeletons. Bulletin of the United States National Museum no. 39. 9 pp.

Lucas, F. A. 1914. The preparation of skulls and skeletons for museum purposes. Proceedings of the American Association of Museums, 8:151-159.

Lucas, F. A. 1950. The preparation of rough skeletons. American Museum of Natural History Science Guide no. 59. 20 pp.

Luther, P. G. 1949. Enzymatic maceration of skeletons. Proceedings of the Linnean Society, London, 161:146-147.

Maiorana, V. C., and L. M. Van Valen. 1985. Terrestrial isopods for preparing delicate vertebrate skeletons. Systematic Zoology, 34(2):242-245.

Martin, R. L. 1964. Skull degreasing technique. Turtox News, 42(10):248-249.

Mayden, R. L., and E. O. Wiley. 1984. A method of preparing disarticulated skeletons of small fishes. Copeia, 1984(1):230-232.

McComb, N. W. n.d. Preparing skeletons using dermestid beetles. Connecticut Valley Biological Supply Co., Inc., Southampton, Massachusetts. 8 pp.

Nelson, E. M. 1963. A preparation of a standard teleost study skull. Turtox News, 41(2):72-74.

Newton, A. 1860. Suggestions for saving parts of the skeleton of birds. Pp. 417-421, in Annual Report, Board of Regents, Smithsonian Institution. 448 pp.

Ossian, C. R. 1970. Preparation of disarticulated skeletons using enzyme-based laundry "pre-soakers". Copeia, 1970(1):199-200.

Palmieri, J. R. 1968. The preparation of bird and mammalian skulls. Carolina Tips, 31:21-22.

Pecina, P., and J. Porkert. 1975. Nauphoeta cinerea as a resort to preparation of skeletons and skulls of medium-sized vertebrates. Lynx, n.s. 17:76-78.

Patterson, R., and B. H. Brattstrom. 1971. Preparing herp skeletons. American Biology Teacher, 33:554.

Rhodin, S. D., P. G. Haneline, and A. G. J. Rhodin. 1976. Skeletal preparation of herpetological specimens. Herpetological Review, 7(4):169-170.

Roberts, A. 1964. The preparation and use of mammal skeletal materials for the science classroom. American Biology Teacher, 26:416-425.

Roche, J. 1954. Préparation des pièces ostéologues. Mammalia, 18(4):420-422.

Sanders, O. 1953. A rapid method for preparing skeletons from preserved salientia. Herpetologica, 9(1):48.

Scarborough, T. J., and R. H. Green. 1986. The preparation of osteological material with the aid of insects. Pp. 101-105, in 1986 Pacific Preparators Conference, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launcetown, Tasmania. 105 pp.

Scharff, R. F. 1911. On a dry system of macerating bones. Museums Journal, 10(7):198-200.

Schmitt, D. M. 1966. How to prepare skeletons. Ward's Curriculum Aid, Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Rochester, New York. 8 pp.

Sealander, J. A., and R. G. Leonard. 1954. Use of crayfish for cleaning skeletal material. Journal of Mammalogy, 35:428-429.

Sherman, H. B. 1925. A degreasing apparatus. Journal of Mammalogy, 6(3):182-184.

Simmons, J. E. 1986. A method for preparation of anuran osteological material. Pp. 37-39, in Proceedings of the 1985 Workshop on Care and Maintenance of Natural History Collections (J. Waddington and D. M. Rudkin, eds.) Royal Ontario Museum Life Sciences Miscellaneous Publications. 121 pp.

Sommer, H. G., and S. Anderson. 1974. Cleaning skeletons with dermestid beetles -- two refinements in the method. Curator, 17:290-298.

Storer, R. W. 1988. Preparation of bird skeletons. Bird Collection Newsletter, 1:1-5.

Thompsett, D. H. 1958. The preparation of skeletons. Museums Journal, 57:282-287.

Tiemeier, O. W. 1939. The dermestid method of cleaning skeletons. University of Kansas Science Bulletin, 26:377-383.

Tiemeier, O. W. 1950. The os opticus of birds. Journal of Morphology, 86:25-46.

Timm, R. M. 1982. Dermestids. Field Museum of Natural History Bulletin, 53(2):14-18.
Torres, H. 1972. Instrucciónes para preparar y conservar cráneos de Mamíferos. Hoja Mimeo. Santiago, Chile.

Valcarcel, A., and D. L. Johnson. 1981. A new dermestid repository for skeleton preparation. Curator, 24:261-264.

Vestjens, W. J. M., A. H. D'Andria, and G. F. van Tets. 1975. Notes on the preparation of osteological specimens. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Division of Wildlife Research, Technical Memorandum, 10:1-16.

Vorhies, C. T. 1948. A chest for dermestid cleaning of skulls. Journal of Mammalogy, 29:188-189.

Wiles, I. A. 1932. A method for the disarticulation of skull bones. Science, 75:516-517.

Williams, S. L., and S. P. Rogers. 1989. Effects of initial preparation methods on dermestid cleaning of osteological material. Collection Forum, 5(1):11-16.

John, D. K. 1979. A general review for laymen of the Smithsonian Institution's facilities and procedures for the preparation of skeletons from Recent zoological remains. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. 5 pp.

Jones, R. E. 1970. "Bug" culture. Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, California. 3 pp.

Jones, R. E. 1973. Untitled instructions on skeleton handling techniques at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, California. 3 pp.

Remsen, J. V., Jr. (1984-5). Preparation of skeletal bird specimens. Louisiana State University Museum of Zoology, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 2 pp.

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#32 Jevne

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 03:33 AM

Why thank you, RedDragon, but you really did not have to go to all that trouble.

http://www.taxidermy...=128177.40;wap2

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#33 aurora

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 11:10 AM

:clap:
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#34 Athena

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:27 AM

I make many types of native crafts from birds and the traditional way of doing this is very simple and usually gives great results.

Take some wire and extend the the wing fully and wire into the position you want. Feet are the same so if you want a claw to hold a stone you wire it around the stone. Wings and feet usually don't have much fleshy parts so that's all that's required then place it in a shoe box half filled with cornmeal place the parts in the box then fully cover with several inches of cornmeal making sure the parts are fully surrounded by cornmeal. Then place it in a cool dry place for a month checking from time to time for smell of decay there should be none. At the end of the month your parts should be fully dried and stiff in the position you put them in remove all wiring and there you have it. Use a stiff paint brush to remove excess paintbrush over a garbage.

Forgive me if someone else has suggested this but for preserving bones a simple way is to mix 1/2 Elmer's or white glue and half water mix thoroughly then apply with a paint brush its simple and cheap and doesn't require lots of chemicals.

Edited by Athena, 14 January 2013 - 09:33 AM.

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#35 Whiterose

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:34 AM

I make many types of native crafts from birds and the traditional way of doing this is very simple and usually gives great results.

Take some wire and extend the the wing fully and wire into the position you want. Feet are the same so if you want a claw to hold a stone you wire it around the stone. Wings and feet usually don't have much fleshy parts so that's all that's required then place it in a shoe box half filled with cornmeal place the parts in the box then fully cover with several inches of cornmeal making sure the parts are fully surrounded by cornmeal. Then place it in a cool dry place for a month checking from time to time for smell of decay there should be none. At the end of the month your parts should be fully dried and stiff in the position you put them in remove all wiring and there you have it. Use a stiff paint brush to remove excess paintbrush over a garbage.

Forgive me if someone else has suggested this but for preserving bones a simple way is to mix 1/2 Elmer's or white glue and half water mix thoroughly then apply with a paint brush its simple and cheap and doesn't require lots of chemicals.


Now that sounds easy enough to try. Thanks! +1

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#36 Midge

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 06:40 AM

Excellent article. That's all I can say. I do need to start carrying around a bag, gloves and meat scissors in my back box (as I drive a scooter) I think the scissors are needed to chop off what I need roadside as I can just picture trying to stuff a badger corpse in the back box and having to let it flop half out as I drive home just for it then to fall out. XD


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#37 foxman

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:48 AM

Skull Bones are interesting - especially the human kind! Most of these are inherited - you just don't go and raid someone's grave! In our tradition if you are lucky enough to 'own' one, they are trated like you had a Goddess/God or Spirit from the other-world before you. Some people use them for divination, some people use them to cast a curse on soeone else - thereby escaping from the affects of the curse. Some are used in healing, and some are used as a drinking vessel (Buddhist Monks use them this way - in fact, most of the bones of a Buddhist Monk who has died and was revered in life, can sometimesxbecome 'useful' in death. For instance they can make a kind of flute or trumpet from the Thigh bone of a monk (so the legend about the end of the world is signalled by someone blowing a tune on the thigh-bone of Buddha is based on fact)!

 

I use claws, Teeth, and some odd-shaped seed-vessels on plants for various things - such as a kind of reed that grows in China forms a seed pod shaped like a Horned God's Head, about two to three inches from horn-tip to Horn-tip, and two inches deep. It is useful for affect in ritual and it lends itself to whatecver I'm doing psychically.foxman


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#38 Aloe

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:27 AM

Skull Bones are interesting - especially the human kind! Most of these are inherited - you just don't go and raid someone's grave! 

 

 

Why get messy digging up a grave when you can just buy one from The Bone Room (as many members here have) lol... 


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"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#39 aurora

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:32 AM

WHAT!!!.................throwing the shovel away.Well im keeping the vertebra
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#40 Autumn Moon

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:40 AM

Why get messy digging up a grave when you can just buy one from The Bone Room (as many members here have) lol... 

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The bone room is neat, but I think the law prohibits Canadians from purchasing any human bones. But, even if we could, I don't think I would want some person's head sitting in my house - a person of whom I know nothing, and may not want to know. Quite a few years ago, I was in a private museum. There was a human skull there among all the antique clutter. The skull looked like it had been hit with a pointed weapon of some sort in the left frontal area. There was no information about it. I picked it up and was immediately sorry I had done so. I got such a sick feeling from it, and I was physically sick for a few days after.


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