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ruby

Mugwort Tea

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Any mugwort tea drinkers...do you have a tried and true recipe you like? I drank my first cup of mugwort tea last evening, by itself and, although I actually like the taste <some warned me it might be a bit bitter> I think it would have been much better mixed with other herbs perhaps.

 

 

I have one that includes 3 parts rose petals, and 1 part cinnamon, nutmeg, and bay each<Incense,Oils and Brews> but am looking for others.

 

I googled on the internet a bit, but would trust someone's direct experience with their recipe here a bit more.

 

 

Although I use herbs and resins a lot for burning, carrying and incense making and am comfortable within those practices-ingesting is new for me. So, safe, tested, recipes with this particular herb in tea, is much appreciated, if anyone is willing to share.

 

Thanks!

~Ruby

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Although I use herbs and resins a lot for burning, carrying and incense making and am comfortable within those practices-ingesting is new for me. So, safe, tested, recipes with this particular herb in tea, is much appreciated, if anyone is willing to share.

 

Thanks!

~Ruby

 

 

You might try adding some dried stevia leaf to cut the bitterness, I do this with a lot of herbs that aren't quite so tasty in teas. :)

 

When asking for a 'safe' recipe keep in mind that what's safe for one person might not be for another. Hell I eat a certain wild berry in the summer that has warnings of "Don't eat, has fatal toxins, will cause death!" all over it in herb books and I haven't died yet because I was taught the proper way to eat them by experienced elders. Because of the way I was taught to handle and use plants, safety issues never used to occur to me when recommending them to others because I assumed certain things were common knowledge. Just a heads up since you're new to ingesting, I realize you may have already known this.

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You might try adding some dried stevia leaf to cut the bitterness, I do this with a lot of herbs that aren't quite so tasty in teas. :)

 

When asking for a 'safe' recipe keep in mind that what's safe for one person might not be for another. Hell I eat a certain wild berry in the summer that has warnings of "Don't eat, has fatal toxins, will cause death!" all over it in herb books and I haven't died yet because I was taught the proper way to eat them by experienced elders. Because of the way I was taught to handle and use plants, safety issues never used to occur to me when recommending them to others because I assumed certain things were common knowledge. Just a heads up since you're new to ingesting, I realize you may have already known this.

 

Thanks for the info, Aloe! I am super sensitive to everything it seems, so that is good advice for me. I do understand that everyone is different and will react differently, but it doesn't hurt to be reminded, so thank you. I am a safety conscious person & generally like to try and know all I can about an herb before I will actively use it. But, yeah, I haven't had anyone teach me, so what I learn at this point, is through my own research which consists mostly of reading, and trial and error...speaking of which... wish I would have thought of stevia last night when trying a bit of yarrow in a mix..blech...lol! :yuck:

 

~Ruby

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Thanks for the info, Aloe! I am super sensitive to everything it seems, so that is good advice for me. I do understand that everyone is different and will react differently, but it doesn't hurt to be reminded, so thank you. I am a safety conscious person & generally like to try and know all I can about an herb before I will actively use it. But, yeah, I haven't had anyone teach me, so what I learn at this point, is through my own research which consists mostly of reading, and trial and error...speaking of which... wish I would have thought of stevia last night when trying a bit of yarrow in a mix..blech...lol! :yuck:

 

~Ruby

 

Haha, I think I once described a yarrow tincture as tasting like a "dropper full of death". :sickwitch:

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Thanks for bringing this up, Ruby. I have been wanting to try some Mugwort tea.

 

Oh good, I'm not the only one then!

 

Just an FYI- I bought a few packages from a company called 13moons. <its an online store only> and the store owner and I talked back and forth a bit via email just yesterday. I verified with her that the organic mugwort on her website is food grade, and she gathers her own yarrow....which I guess is a whole other topic in itself, but an important one. I'd llike to think anything labeled organic is ok, but, I don't know, I'm just overly cautious, I guess.

 

As a newer person to ingesting the kind of herbs you really can't get in a grocery store <at least where I live>, it has been interesting reading labels and has made me a bit uncomfortable trying to learn which companies sell herbs that are, in fact, food grade. My local occult shop sells herbs that are clearly marked, not for internal use...mugwort included...other stores, the labeling is a bit more ambiguous...I am guessing the safest of all is to grow your own, just a guess though.

 

Maybe someone will come along in here and offer some good, tried and true websites where you can buy food grade herbs like mugwort safely & consistently.

 

~Ruby

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Maybe someone will come along in here and offer some good, tried and true websites where you can buy food grade herbs like mugwort safely & consistently.

 

~Ruby

 

Me and a lot of people I know buy from Mountain Rose Herbs for herbs we intend to eat. http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/

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Haha, I think I once described a yarrow tincture as tasting like a "dropper full of death". :sickwitch:

 

LOL! ewww...it is so gross tasting..lol

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My whole witches circle will second mountain rose herbs. Good sized bags, good price, good color, fresh dried, good eating.

 

As for mugwort I like one teaspoon of dried herb steeped in hot water for ten minutes, it might not taste great, but if you get the herbs out, you can let it cool gown to gulping temperature so you don't have to sip it, makes the taste go by much faster.

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Thanks Ruby & Aloe. Like Maggie, I have been wanting to try the tea but am a bit hesitant because of the usual warnings. I haven't yet found a supplier in the UK that labels their product as fit for consumption but I suppose they're covering themselves against irresponsible gulpers who might tip the whole bag in.

I've read wonderful things about mugwort but, being careful, suppose that the only way to safely get the effect you're hoping for is (like everything else) one step at a time and very carefully.

Interesting topic.

Aloe, I wish I'd had older family members that taught me the way you were taught about natural things. Everything I had as a child came out of a packet or tin.

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Aloe, I wish I'd had older family members that taught me the way you were taught about natural things. Everything I had as a child came out of a packet or tin.

 

There are benefits to growing up in a family of hillbillies out in the middle of nowhere. ;)

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where you can buy food grade herbs like mugwort safely & consistently.

 

At least here in the US, labeling anything is something of a concern. The word "organic" is regulated by the FDA, as are a few others. Even using the term "food grade" can raise political hackles. To avoid problems, a lot of people (like me) prefer "pesticide- and fungicide-free, non-irradiated". That gets you an organic, food-grade product without inducing enquiries or paying through the nose for "Certified Organic" products. So you might look for those terms, as well.

 

BTW, Mountain Rose Herbs is excellent, as are StarWest Botanicals and the San Francisco Herb Company. On the latter two beware: their herb prices are in line with everyone else but the shipping charges will bite you (at least in my experience).

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At least here in the US, labeling anything is something of a concern. The word "organic" is regulated by the FDA, as are a few others. Even using the term "food grade" can raise political hackles. To avoid problems, a lot of people (like me) prefer "pesticide- and fungicide-free, non-irradiated". That gets you an organic, food-grade product without inducing enquiries or paying through the nose for "Certified Organic" products. So you might look for those terms, as well.

 

BTW, Mountain Rose Herbs is excellent, as are StarWest Botanicals and the San Francisco Herb Company. On the latter two beware: their herb prices are in line with everyone else but the shipping charges will bite you (at least in my experience).

 

The labeling issue makes more sense to me now; I appreciate the info.! I appreciate the website recommendations as well & the heads up on the shipping!

 

 

 

Everyone commenting so far seem to really like Mountain Rose Herbs, so I went ahead and ordered a catalog from them. Thanks for sharing your thoughts everyone!

 

Best Regards,

~Ruby

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Mugwort can be a little bitter by it self. I've found that mixing it with an equal amount of damiana and adding a little honey makes for a very soothing evening brew .

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"I haven't yet found a supplier in the UK that labels their product as fit for consumption but I suppose they're covering themselves against irresponsible gulpers who might tip the whole bag in."

 

Hi Absinthe, I don't know if you have heard of baldwin and co but they do sell herbs for consumption. It's pretty great quality and they have almost everything.

The shop is in London but they have an online shop too (www.baldwins.co.uk/).

 

Luthien

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Hi Absinthe, I don't know if you have heard of baldwin and co but they do sell herbs for consumption. It's pretty great quality and they have almost everything.

The shop is in London but they have an online shop too (www.baldwins.co.uk/).

 

Luthien

 

Thanks for this Luthien. They have a lovely range. Will place an order shortly.

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You are welcome Rowan! It's a fantastic shop, shame I moved away from the UK..... can't find something similar in Germany.

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Anara, Judika Illes has a recipe for mugwort tea called "Artemisia Potion". I don't know if it's permissible to post it here or not since it comes from her book, Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells. You can google it though. :) Her blend helps to tone down the bitterness and it's a great tea in general but even better when using it for divination. ;) I keep a pre-made jar of it in my herb cupboard.

 

:crystal-gazing:

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Anara, Judika Illes has a recipe for mugwort tea called "Artemisia Potion". I don't know if it's permissible to post it here or not since it comes from her book, Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells. You can google it though. :) Her blend helps to tone down the bitterness and it's a great tea in general but even better when using it for divination. ;) I keep a pre-made jar of it in my herb cupboard.

 

:crystal-gazing:

 

Thank you for the post, Lucea!

 

I actually have this book & have it opened right now, looking at the Artemisia Potion info. <pg 942>. I'm so glad you added your thoughts, since you use this blend already and like it! I like how the instructions are so detailed; perfect for someone new to the ingesting aspect of using herbs. Although, I see yarrow again as part of this recipe <YUCK :yuck: ...lol>, I also see some other ingredients that I would imagine tone down the bitter taste of yarrow.

 

Thanks again!

 

Anara

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I'm glad it was helpful. :)

 

I've noted the yarrow references on this thread. LOL I love yarrow (L&F) and use it in my herbal iced tea recipe with no bitter affect. I guess to each her own. ;) If you aren't crazy about the yarrow then I'd just leave it out. It's certainly not necessary and you could substitute it with another divinitory herb of your choice that you like the taste of.

 

Enjoy!

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I'm glad it was helpful. :)

 

I've noted the yarrow references on this thread. LOL I love yarrow (L&F) and use it in my herbal iced tea recipe with no bitter affect. I guess to each her own. ;) If you aren't crazy about the yarrow then I'd just leave it out. It's certainly not necessary and you could substitute it with another divinitory herb of your choice that you like the taste of.

 

Enjoy!

 

Truthfully, I'll try it at least once, as is, then go from there. There are a lot of nice ingredients in that particular recipe that I love anyway, that may totally mask the bitterness for me. Thanks again for your kind reply, and who knows, may end up finding a way to like yarrow in tea after all LOL :)

 

On another note, the thought of herbal iced tea sounds awesome, right about now. Yum!

 

 

Anara

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Guest copperhedge

Anyone grow their own or harvest Mugwort as it grows? Wondering if anyone noticed differences?

 

(But being pregnant i wouldn't currently consume Mugwort)

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Anyone grow their own or harvest Mugwort as it grows? Wondering if anyone noticed differences?

 

(But being pregnant i wouldn't currently consume Mugwort)

 

Yes, I grow my own. As with nearly any plant, it takes on the characteristics of its environment. I garden in terrible soil. The native "soil" is red clay so I've amended the beds with what passes for topsoil around here (it would be considered fill dirt in my home state of Minnesota). My mugwort is a paler green than that I've purchased in the past. Its qualities, however, are not diminished as I've noticed no difference there.

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