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Rune Rede by Ruarik Grimnisson


Michele

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Just ordered this. On Amazon US it was $50.00, but Amazon UK it was only $36.00 (including the shipping!). Odd. Anyway, not read it yet (obviously, lol) but it was recommended by someone I respect so I am hopeing to enjoy it. Will let you know...

 

M

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Just ordered this. On Amazon US it was $50.00, but Amazon UK it was only $36.00 (including the shipping!). Odd. Anyway, not read it yet (obviously, lol) but it was recommended by someone I respect so I am hopeing to enjoy it. Will let you know...

 

M

 

Be interested to know how that goes Michelle.

I've bought 'Odin's Gateways: A Practical Guide to the Wisdom of the Runes. through Galdr, Sigils and Casting' by Katie Gerrard for some holiday reading.

 

I've sadly neglected Runes over the years, but this year I've had one of those clunks around the head one get's every now and often (in my case!). stars.gif

 

 

 

 

 

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Interesting - I've had the same clunk of late, lol. I've never worked with runes; made a set once and couldn't get into them and they becmae cat toys. But I think that may have been becuase I am not particularly into divination. I was doing a ritual and I had a rune appear and tell me something and I realized that divination is not their sole, nor even their original, meaning. So being as it has come up I figure it may be time to look into them :-)

 

M

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  • 3 weeks later...

Michele, have you read this book? I would be most interested in your thoughts, as myself included, have the desire to work with runes, something I've never done. Yet on the Harvest Moon, I was prompted to do such as one of the things I stockpiled to help me get through the winter months. Learn about Runes. lol. My facination with mythology is such an unscientific way of explaining how the Universe came into being and the interrelationship between the fundamental powers of Nature and how they function. The runes are tied with Odin and the myth of him hanging upside down on a tree for 9 days and nights without food or drink, pierced by his own spear. During his suffering he lost an eye but formed the Runes, which were revealed as a gift to humanity from the non-ordinary reality of shamanic experience. The runes and the development of them point a finger in this direction for me. Perception, as the " eye " is physical but the perception is seeing with the soul through the opening of inner eyes, and listening to unheard sounds through the opening of inner ears.

 

I still have convictions that this 'tree' that Odin hung from ' the Tree of Yggdrasil ' was a Yew.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

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Michele, have you read this book? I would be most interested in your thoughts, as myself included, have the desire to work with runes, something I've never done. Yet on the Harvest Moon, I was prompted to do such as one of the things I stockpiled to help me get through the winter months. Learn about Runes. lol. My facination with mythology is such an unscientific way of explaining how the Universe came into being and the interrelationship between the fundamental powers of Nature and how they function. The runes are tied with Odin and the myth of him hanging upside down on a tree for 9 days and nights without food or drink, pierced by his own spear. During his suffering he lost an eye but formed the Runes, which were revealed as a gift to humanity from the non-ordinary reality of shamanic experience. The runes and the development of them point a finger in this direction for me. Perception, as the " eye " is physical but the perception is seeing with the soul through the opening of inner eyes, and listening to unheard sounds through the opening of inner ears.

 

I still have convictions that this 'tree' that Odin hung from ' the Tree of Yggdrasil ' was a Yew.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

Not yet, lol... I have to get it directly from Capal Bann as it seems Amazon can't figure out the currency exchange. But I am looking forward to to getting it. And although they say the world tree is Ash, there are some, I believe, who think it was actually yew. :-) It is weird to me to be working with the runes as I've never been into them before and I don't do diviniation but I am not using them for divination... but yes, it is exciting to be working with them. I have had my rune set for several weeks now and am really enjoyed it.

 

M

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I bought a set of bone runes this past year, and I've only barely used them. I love they way they feel, and the simplicity, but I get frustrated by having to look up the meanings (I also bought a book about runes to help...). I'm sure that it would get easier if I would just sit down and practice. :)

 

I haven't used them in magic yet. I might pick up that book, Michele. Thanks for bringing it up!

 

I do have a question, though, what's the significance of the Tree being a yew as opposed to an ash?

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I would think it is the Yew tree being an ancestral tree- a tree for working with the dead. Re the runes - don't look up in books and memorize them. I suck at memorization and it then becomes completely logical and intellectual - i.e. not magical. The runes themselves are symbols. They can be used as an alphabet to write with which isn't particularly magical. Get a feel for the runes themselves, and a connection to the force that powers the runes. Maybe a one or two word "reminder" for what it represents. And know what that thing meant to the people/culture who "invented" the runes... if I was using them for divination, I wouldn't even use them most likely, becuase I'm not big into divination. For me, it's making a connection with the force behind the runes, listening to it, and learning from it and learning to work with it/within it. (Which is a long hard process, lol)

 

M

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  • 1 month later...

Okay - finally got the book in the post this afternoon (no fault of Capall Bann that it took so long, problems with figuring out the currency conversion on Amazon and having to order and pay through another route).

 

I have flipped through it and I like the little bit I have seen so far. I am not looking for a book on divinition and although this book does address that it also appears to address the forces behind the runes which is what I was looking for. I will probably not bother to read the "divinatory" meanings section as I do not have a specific interest in that at this time other than what they mean to me, personally, through my understanding of the forces that drive the runes. I also like that I found some colour and number associations in there that are not necessarily standard (at least in the new-age books) and are more what I tend to follow, so seeing he was of that bent was a plus. I also see he describes sedir NOT merely as divinitory magic (as so many seem to do) but as an "elemental" form of magic "having to do with understanding and manipulating natural phenomena" and states it is akin to shamanism often involving trance states and therefore deemed as "passive/submissive" and that's why it is associated as feminine. Rarely do I ever see what I'd consider a decent definition of sedir (not that I know that much about it, lol).

 

This is not a book about the eclectic associations and meanings of the runes and so if one isn't interested in the Northern European/Germanic associations one may not be interested in this book, but from the quick flip-through I am looking forward to taking it up to the pub for a read this weekend.

 

M

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The runes are tied with Odin and the myth of him hanging upside down on a tree for 9 days and nights without food or drink, pierced by his own spear. During his suffering he lost an eye but formed the Runes, which were revealed as a gift to humanity from the non-ordinary reality of shamanic experience. The runes and the development of them point a finger in this direction for me. Perception, as the " eye " is physical but the perception is seeing with the soul through the opening of inner eyes, and listening to unheard sounds through the opening of inner ears.

 

Hi CelticGypsy, please forgive me my impudence but I would like to correct you. According to the myth Odin did not loose his eye while hanging on the World Tree. He sacrificed his eye in order to drink from Mimir's well of wisdom.

Anyhow, just that no one gets confused.

However, as you said: Odin has received the rune and their wisdome through a shamanic experience and I agree with you that in order to preceive them one has to see... "with the soul through the opening of inner eyes...." (well said!)

 

 

The book sounds interesting! Wish I had the money to buy it. Thanks for brining it up Michele.

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I very much liked this book, but if one is not into the runes from the Northern European/Germanic perspective then I do not think they would be into this book. It is not Eclectic, but very much geared towards the myths of the Asier & Vanir (sp) and their way of working with them.

 

M

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Hi CelticGypsy, please forgive me my impudence but I would like to correct you. According to the myth Odin did not loose his eye while hanging on the World Tree. He sacrificed his eye in order to drink from Mimir's well of wisdom.

Anyhow, just that no one gets confused.

However, as you said: Odin has received the rune and their wisdome through a shamanic experience and I agree with you that in order to preceive them one has to see... "with the soul through the opening of inner eyes...." (well said!)

 

 

The book sounds interesting! Wish I had the money to buy it. Thanks for brining it up Michele.

 

Oh nothing to forgive at all Luthien, I welcome the clarification, in fact I like your verbiage better than mine ! lol ! It shows me that Odin, offered up something of value, an act of giving up something of value for the sake of something that is of greater value or importance. Much more enlightening than just " losing " an eye.

 

Luthien, would you consider a Stand Alone Post regarding Odin and your preception of this tale ? I know there are many versions to this Mythos, but you seem to have a neat grip on this, I'm sure it would generate alot of consideration here with our Peers.

 

I'm such a huge fan of myths and fairy tales, I truely believe that when reading inbetween the lines of them, there is much there to also be taken in for anyones respected Pathworking.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Oh nothing to forgive at all Luthien, I welcome the clarification, in fact I like your verbiage better than mine ! lol ! It shows me that Odin, offered up something of value, an act of giving up something of value for the sake of something that is of greater value or importance. Much more enlightening than just " losing " an eye.

 

Luthien, would you consider a Stand Alone Post regarding Odin and your preception of this tale ? I know there are many versions to this Mythos, but you seem to have a neat grip on this, I'm sure it would generate alot of consideration here with our Peers.

 

I'm such a huge fan of myths and fairy tales, I truely believe that when reading inbetween the lines of them, there is much there to also be taken in for anyones respected Pathworking.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Yes, I indeed think that the story of how Odin came to be one eyed has a fundamental spiritual truth within it. It is something every witch knows but our, from modern science affected cultur likes to overlook. namely that seeing with the eye does not provide us with wisdom and knowledge alone......

 

Anyhow, I'm no expert on the topic. I just like norse mythology but I do a search regarding the topic and if i shouldn't find anything that already discusses the topic I will start something new.

 

Best

Lu

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...

Anyhow, I'm no expert on the topic. I just like norse mythology but I do a search regarding the topic and if i shouldn't find anything that already discusses the topic I will start something new...

 

Best

Lu

 

Also sight - as in there are two kinds.

 

M

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  • 1 month later...

You know what Peers, this post has been haunting me. lol ! So much in fact that I trodded down to some old boxes of books in the basement, I was so plagued as to the name of this author, thinking I've heard of this author before !

 

I bought this book back in '95 on a layover in England......... for F's sake! lol!!!! Now that this has been discovered, and brought back out for my reading pleasure, I will certainly utilize its teaching skills, as I promised myself to learn Runes during this winter, and fashion my own runes.

 

You are so right M " Also sight......... there are two kinds ":wink:

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

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As Michele pointed out, it's quite possible that the original intent of runes was not one of divination. In fact, there's really no rock solid evidence they were ever used for that. The closest bit of history comes from the Roman Tacitus's work, 'Germania", but he never actually says "runes".. he says that a bough is cut from a fruit bearing tree and cut into pieces which are cast onto a cloth. The word "runes" is not found anywhere in Germania for that matter.. which is also perhaps weird.

Though.. that said.. if not runes, then what? We know of no other symbols the germanic tribes used.

That's touched on a bit here, and I tend to agree with the author.

http://www.runewebvi...0F%20A%20Qs.htm (excellent site, by the way)

 

What is absolutely clear though, from Norse writings, is that runes were used in magic and healing, as well as communication.

(There's also a blurb there about using menstrual blood on runes if that piques anyone's interest, but you might not like the conclusion)

 

Ah, one other little point.. it's often assumed that Odin hung upside down on Yggdrasil, but that too is not mentioned in the Rúnatal. Only that he hung himself, but which orientation, we don't really know.

 

I've got something like 9 books on runes now, and not one of them seems very similar to another.

Runes are such a vast, esoteric subject. An author (or reader) can approach them from the typical modern divinatory perspective, or the really far out esoteric viewpoint, like Thorsson's "runic yoga", or Guido List's "Armanen Runes", or, they can be covered from the magical leechcraft type angle as Michele mentioned, and of course even a purely academic, historical viewpoint, such as "Introduction to the English Runes" by R. I. Page, and boy, was that dry reading. ;) (Still good info though)

 

And lastly, I've got my rune forum in my sig now to make it easier to find. I haven't given up on it, but it has been quiet for a while.

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If you are interested in learning the Runes, I would suggest "The Rune Primer" by Sweyn Plowright. It contains a lot of good information in one volume, including the Norse and Old English Runes poems. I read a lot on them when they first called to me, and I have to say now they are an inseperable part of my life. I was carrying around 4 diffrent books each day to do my daily readings, so I eventually created my own Rune book by combining the elements of other people's interpretations of the poems with my own, and by comparing my meanings with the orginal poems, I was able to create short sayings that I could use in my interpretations.

 

 

 

I draw an Odin's Rune once a day as a focal point for meditation and to use as a direction for my thoughts for the day. I also abandoned the "associated meanings" between the Runes, as I could find no primary source material to coroborate their being associated meanings.

 

 

By the way, speaking of Odin's sacrifice..... My favorite story is of the god Tyr and how he sacrificed his hand, the wolf Fenris threatned the cosmic order, so Tyr allowed Fenris to eat his hand while the other gods bound him.

 

 

Bindrunes are awesome too, they are like little amulets or spells! I love love love them!!! If anyone wants a bindrune tutorial, I'll be happy to oblige.

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As Michele pointed out, it's quite possible that the original intent of runes was not one of divination. In fact, there's really no rock solid evidence they were ever used for that. The closest bit of history comes from the Roman Tacitus's work, 'Germania", but he never actually says "runes".. he says that a bough is cut from a fruit bearing tree and cut into pieces which are cast onto a cloth. The word "runes" is not found anywhere in Germania for that matter.. which is also perhaps weird.

Though.. that said.. if not runes, then what? We know of no other symbols the germanic tribes used.

That's touched on a bit here, and I tend to agree with the author.

http://www.runewebvi...0F%20A%20Qs.htm (excellent site, by the way)

 

What is absolutely clear though, from Norse writings, is that runes were used in magic and healing, as well as communication.

(There's also a blurb there about using menstrual blood on runes if that piques anyone's interest, but you might not like the conclusion)

 

Ah, one other little point.. it's often assumed that Odin hung upside down on Yggdrasil, but that too is not mentioned in the Rúnatal. Only that he hung himself, but which orientation, we don't really know.

 

I've got something like 9 books on runes now, and not one of them seems very similar to another.

Runes are such a vast, esoteric subject. An author (or reader) can approach them from the typical modern divinatory perspective, or the really far out esoteric viewpoint, like Thorsson's "runic yoga", or Guido List's "Armanen Runes", or, they can be covered from the magical leechcraft type angle as Michele mentioned, and of course even a purely academic, historical viewpoint, such as "Introduction to the English Runes" by R. I. Page, and boy, was that dry reading. ;) (Still good info though)

 

And lastly, I've got my rune forum in my sig now to make it easier to find. I haven't given up on it, but it has been quiet for a while.

 

I have found that when runes are used for straight divinition of the "will I ever meet the love of my life?" type, that the deeper meanings of what is behind the rune is not considered. Gebo, yes, is often interpreted as the gift, but Norse culture was very big on hospitality. When one gets a gift, one is rather "bound" to return it. So Gebo is a bonding, and within that bonding can come a responsibility. It is roads that are two-way streets of communication and thereby a gift that can or may be expected to be returned if the bond is continued - just as communication unanswered will cease to be communication and eventually fade to nothing. Gebo is a bonding, but one that very much works both ways.

 

M

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  • 8 months later...

I have been drawn to runes for the past few months. I have used runes occasionally but never on any form of in depth study. I have found this book for sale, and I'm considering buying it. I'm not interested in using the runes for divination, but for spell and as keys (for lack of a better word) to other. So for those that have read this book and others what would you all suggest?

I have a book called Futhark which is good, but I don't recall much about it. I need to reread it. I do remember there was a suggestion to bend your body into the shape of the rune to use its energy. That seemed a little silly to me when I read that, but now I'm thinking it might not be auch a silly idea now.

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I have been drawn to runes for the past few months. I have used runes occasionally but never on any form of in depth study. I have found this book for sale, and I'm considering buying it. I'm not interested in using the runes for divination, but for spell and as keys (for lack of a better word) to other. So for those that have read this book and others what would you all suggest?

I have a book called Futhark which is good, but I don't recall much about it. I need to reread it. I do remember there was a suggestion to bend your body into the shape of the rune to use its energy. That seemed a little silly to me when I read that, but now I'm thinking it might not be auch a silly idea now.

 

 

I don't think bending your body into a rune pose is silly. This concept is what I refered to when I mentioned posturing in another thread and some people brought up the that yoga does the same thing. I have experienced very intense currents of energy using this method, though I have not invoke the runes with the poses. Something to try.

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I don't think bending your body into a rune pose is silly. This concept is what I refered to when I mentioned posturing in another thread and some people brought up the that yoga does the same thing. I have experienced very intense currents of energy using this method, though I have not invoke the runes with the poses. Something to try.

 

 

I agree now. It's just the first time I read through the book I thought it was slightly silly. But after some more education and learning I can really see the benefits in this type of practice. I am slowly working my way through the Futhark book. I haven't even gotten to the posturing part yet, but when I do I will follow the instructions, and if I get some interesting experiences from it I will let the board know. Unless, the experiences are more personal then I will keep them to myself or just really vague. But I look forward to trying it out.

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