Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

thevioletsunflower

'Old World Witchcraft' by Raven Grimassi

Recommended Posts

The mere controversy alone is making me want to order the book and find out for myself, lol.

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, I went ahead and ordered one...looks like it will be in stock Monday and I should get it by the end of next week, I guess.

 

 

 

and...I have got to stop ordering books...my little library has grown exponentially since joining these forums... LOL!

 

 

~Ruby

 

 

Be sure to read the preface and the intro to the book, otherwise you'll misunderstand what the author is setting out to communicate.

 

Oh, and here are what other authors are saying about the book (from the front pages of the book) -

 

 

“Grimassi's approach to witchcraft brings a vitality and vibrancy to this book. He writes with knowledge, the voice of experience, and the exuberance of a passionate belief. Historical beliefs and practices are seamlessly woven into the fabric of contemporary potential. This is a wonderful book, and I have enjoyed it.” —Rev. Paul Beyerl, author of The Master Book of Herbalism

 

 

“Grimassi brings together an impressive array of threads from folklore, scholarly literature, history, and experience, gifting us with a tapestry—a vibrant picture of the Old Craft of the Wise.”

 

—T. Thorn Coyle, teacher and author of Kissing the Limitless

 

 

“Exposing the Old World witch is no easy task, but after meticulousness research, Grimassi uncovers the real historical witch behind the modern day image. Misconceptions are washed away as the witch of the past is unveiled—a common member of society with uncommon skills and an exceptional understanding of the world about. The inclusion of a modern grimoire embellishes this work and brings to the forefront modern practices of significantly older beliefs. Old World Witchcraft is a generous introduction to a modern practice and its ancient origins.”

 

—Andrew Theitic, editor of The Witches’ Almanac

 

 

 

Old World Witchcraft is destined to be a classic and an agent of change that helps witchcraft regain its position of respect and honor in Paganism and the general community. It is intellectual and spiritual water extinguishing the burning-time flames of hypocrisy. In this amazing book, Raven introduces the reader to the original image of the powerful, respected, and feared witch while detangling the centuries of false illusions, hysteria, and ‘spiritual ethnocide.’ Read and take a trip into the true soul of the witch.”

 

—Orion Foxwood, co-founder of the House of Brigh Faery Seership Institute and author of The Tree of Enchantment

 

 

“Any worker of magic/k will find much inspiration in Raven Grimassi's Old World Witchcraft. The chapter ‘Witches: The Plant People’ is especially intriguing. If the aspiring Green Witch only adopts using ‘charged water’ for her plants, or establishes a ‘Shadow Garden’—a kind of magical compost heap of non-toxic organic materials left over from rituals—or meditates on Grimassi's reflections on mortar and pestle magic/k, she will have more than recouped the price of the book.”

 

—Judith Hawkins-Tillirson, author of The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick

 

 

“On a journey to our magickal past in the Old World to create our future, I can think of no better guide than Raven Grimassi. His experience, scholarship, and, most importantly, wisdom shines through these pages, illuminating anyone's serious practice of witchcraft.”

 

—Christopher Penczak, author of the Temple of Witchcraft series and The Plant Spirit Familiar

 

Old World Witchcraft opens an exciting new window on the whole subject of witchcraft, revealing such concepts as the organic memory of the earth and veneration of the plant kingdom. This is a refreshing book of new yet ancient wisdom that should not be missed. A true delight.”

 

—Raymond Buckland, author of The Witch Book

 

 

“I admire bravery and creativity, and Raven Grimassi's Old World Witchcraft has both in abundance. In a time when many practitioners fawn over the so-called fickle truth of academic perspectives on witchcraft, Raven brings forth mythic truth on what it is to be a witch. This book was written for those who have a vocation to be witches and wish for a path that is modern but whose roots are watered with the essence of the old lore. Old World Witchcraft is a perfect remedy for the disenchanted seeker who is lost in the world of the literalists and looking for the path home to mystery.”

 

—Ivo Dominguez, author of Spirit Speak and the forthcoming Casting Sacred Space

 

 

 

“In Old World Witchcraft, Raven Grimassi effectively strips away the thin veneer of the Wiccan revival to give us credible insight into the truth about the practice of real witches. From a deep understanding of the secret powers of nature, to the ancient magical powers of the moon, to communion with otherworldly beings and the spirits of the dead, the witch is a timeless and mysterious creature. Within these pages, Grimassi opens the doorway to the witch’s cottage, hidden deep within the forest of our consciousness, that we may be blessed by the witch's wisdom once more.”

 

—Christian Day, Salem warlock and author of The Witches’ Book of the Dead

 

 

 

“It is important for witches to understand our origins, especially as we facilitate the dawning of a new age. This wise book can help us appreciate who we are. Exquisitely researched, it also thoroughly refutes the ridiculous charges that have historically been made against us.”

 

—Eileen Holland, author of The Wicca Handbook and The Spellcaster’s Reference

 

 

 

“Raven Grimassi has single-handedly put the witch back into the Craft with this book. Old World Witchcraft is real magic for real witches—and a must have for every serious practitioner!”

 

—Dorothy Morrison, author of Utterly Wicked

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn!! That is quite impressive!!

 

I really am looking forward to our peers reviews!! Next month I AM getting this one!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn!! That is quite impressive!!

 

I really am looking forward to our peers reviews!! Next month I AM getting this one!!

 

I'm curious about how you all view the idea of a deity associated with Witchcraft. Some people automatically label the idea "Wiccan" despite the fact that pre-Christian literature contains tales of witches and goddess dealings. Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious about how you all view the idea of a deity associated with Witchcraft. Some people automatically label the idea "Wiccan" despite the fact that pre-Christian literature contains tales of witches and goddess dealings. Thoughts?

 

 

That's a good question actually and I have tried working with them from time to time especially those in the Celtic pantheon. I'm not quite sure I would necessarily label it as "Wiccan" as there are many paths that work with gods/goddesses.

 

I think it's a very personal thing and as I grow in my path I am starting to learn that labeling things as "Wiccan" and turning the other way may not always be a good idea.

 

Where I am now, there are only 2 things that I walk away from, that would be The Rede or any human imposed "rules" and organized religion.

 

I like to think I'm growing :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work with deities and am well versed on lore surrounding deities associated with craft and magic.

 

However there is a trend in more new age leanings to adopt patron deities, call them the names of old gods but discard their true purposes and portfolios because they aren't 'nice' enough. Certain deities are unfortunately subjected to such a humiliation more often than others and tend to be the ones most covered in literature both for and against such treatment.

 

Calling upon a duo of deities for all your workings does ring more true of wicca than traditional craft. My gods are there and sometimes make themselves known, both within and without the craft, but they are not there on my every whim and I don't need to invoke or involve them in my workings unless it's specifically for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious about how you all view the idea of a deity associated with Witchcraft. Some people automatically label the idea "Wiccan" despite the fact that pre-Christian literature contains tales of witches and goddess dealings. Thoughts?

 

Though I certainly wouldn't say it's Wiccan because that's pretty "either/or" and I don't think it works that way I also wouldn't say it's inherently so. "Traditional" witchcraft exists with or without deity present. Deity can be present depending on the witch but it's simply not necessary. Meaning any association is one given not one inherent.

 

 

That's a good question actually and I have tried working with them from time to time especially those in the Celtic pantheon. I'm not quite sure I would necessarily label it as "Wiccan" as there are many paths that work with gods/goddesses.

 

I think it's a very personal thing and as I grow in my path I am starting to learn that labeling things as "Wiccan" and turning the other way may not always be a good idea.

 

Where I am now, there are only 2 things that I walk away from, that would be The Rede or any human imposed "rules" and organized religion.

 

I like to think I'm growing :)

 

Completely agree, Brigid. And I love the way you put it.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pre-Christian literature contains tales of witches and goddess dealings. Thoughts?

 

Source(s) would be nice - thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you may have misunderstood some of my comments. The book is not that of a non-Witch, the author has long been a practitioner (some forty plus years). The reference to the view of non-Witches is about how the author demonstrates that the official view (meaning the academic view) is compiled from data received from non-Witches (and is therefore not a history of Witches). The author then goes on to uncover a more realistic view of the Witch. But the book is not about history, it only includes a chapter on it. Most of the book is about folkloric elements of Witchcraft from old sources (which you would probably enjoy) and about practical techniques for working with the traditional plants of Witchcraft (as well as their spirits).

 

No misunderstanding Shadow Touch. Your posts are very clear, IMO :). I've been on a number of forums and lists where Raven is a member and I know he has been a practitioner for a long time. It was your reference to the book from a non witch perspective that threw me off :).

 

Folkloric elements of Witchcraft from old sources is just what I"m looking for. Ok, this will have to find a place on my booklist. But I just bought Mr. Chumbley's 2 volume set of Opuscula Magica and Mr. Howard's Children of Cain so my book budget is in the red right now :).

 

Brea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious. Which older books are you referring to Brea?

 

T. C. Lethbridge's Witches and Gog and Magog I thought were both very good reads. Pennnethorne Hughes book Witchcraft. George Evans Pattern Under the Plough. William Gray's Western Inner Workings. Just about anything by Nigel Pennick.

 

The last time I looked, these books were still fairly cheap.

 

Brea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Source(s) would be nice - thanks!

 

Sure, not a problem. Here are a few examples:

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.74 "To the ancient shrine of Hecate Perseis [daughter of Perses], deep in the forest in a shady grove, she [the witch Medea] made her way [to meet with Jason] ... [Jason] grasped her [Medea’s] hand and in low tones besought her aid and promised marriage ... Then by the pure rites of Triformis [three-bodied Hecate] and by whatever Power dwelt in that grove he swore, and by her father’s father [Helios the sun] who sees all the world, and by his triumphs and his perils passed. Then she was sure; and straight the magic herbs she gave into his hands and taught their use [making him invulnerable to fire]."

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.162 "In the deep stillness of the midnight hour ... she [Medea] stretched her arms to the stars ... O Nox [Nyx the Night], Mother of Mysteries, and all ye golden Astra (Stars) who with Luna [selene the Moon] succeed the fires of day, and thou, divine triceps (three-formed) Hecate, who knowest all my enterprises and dost fortify the arts of magic."

 

From Horace, Epode V "Then cruel Canidia [the witch] gnawing her short thumb nail with her rotten tooth-- what did she say and to what did she remain silent? “Oh faithful witnesses of my affairs, Night and Diana, who rules the silence when sacred mysteries are preformed, now, now come, and now turn your wrath and divine will against my enemies.

 

 

From Lucan B.C. 6: 700-01 “Persephone, who is the third and lowest aspect of our [the witches’] goddess Hekate…”

 

We also have, of course, a longstanding tradition in which Hecate is known as the goddess of witchcraft. Here are some notes on the witch Medea that mentions a goddess and Medea as a priestess (a religious connotation).

 

MEDEA – NOTES

 

From: The Cult of the Greek States, by Lewis R. Farnell. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1896

 

The Artemis of colchos, with whom the legend couples the name of Medea, is a goddess of magical incantations and of the arts of poisoning. In the narrative of Diodorus Siculus *, Medea tells Pelias that her tutelary goddess has come to him from Colchis ' riding upon serpents'; and she names her Artemis, though this mode of travelling is suitable only for Hekate, of whom Medea is the priestess and perhaps the ' double ' ''. – page 505

 

FROM: The Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th edition, volume XVIII. New York: The Encyclopedia Britannica Company, 1911 Medea was honoured as a goddess at Corinth, and was said to have become the wife of Achilles in the Elysian fields. The chief seat of her cult, however, was Thessaly, which was always regarded as the home of magic. As time went on her character was less favourably described. In the tale of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours. Some authorities regard Medea as a lunar divinity, but the ancient conception of her as a Thessalian sorceress is probably correct. – page 19

 

From: A Handbook of Mythology, by E.M. Berens. New York: Maynard, Merrill, & Co., 1931 Argus explained to Jason all the difficulties of the superhuman task which lay before him, and pronounced it as his opinion that the only means by which success was possible was to enlist the assistance of the Princess Medea, who was a priestess of Hecate, and a great enchantress. – page 224

 

 

FROM: The Works of Greek and Roman Poets. London: Suttaby, Evance and Fox, 1813 The swearing by Hecate was peculiarly proper in Medea, on account of her being a Colchian, and addicted to magic rites, over which Hecate presided; besides, Medea was priestess of Hecate. – page 152

 

FROM: Tales of Troy and Greece, by Andrew Lang. New York: Longman’s, Green, and Co., 1912 Then they came to the palace, where King Jietes lived, with his young son Absyrtus, and his daughter Chalciope, who had been the wife of Phrixus, and his younger daughter, Medea, who was a witch, and the priestess of Brimo, a dreadful goddess. – page 191

 

 

FROM EURIPIDES: MEDEA Verse 420 -425: I swear by my mistress who I worship most of all and took as my ally long ago, Hecate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

T. C. Lethbridge's Witches and Gog and Magog I thought were both very good reads. Pennnethorne Hughes book Witchcraft. George Evans Pattern Under the Plough. William Gray's Western Inner Workings. Just about anything by Nigel Pennick.

 

The last time I looked, these books were still fairly cheap.

 

Brea

 

A little OT, but, Evans Pattern Under the Plough, really cheap for a new one it's only $316.00! rofl.gif

 

I haven't read Pennick, but he is a FANTASTIC artist!!

http://apps.nigelpennick.com/Gallery/index.cfm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, not a problem. Here are a few examples:

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.74 "To the ancient shrine of Hecate Perseis [daughter of Perses], deep in the forest in a shady grove, she [the witch Medea] made her way [to meet with Jason] ... [Jason] grasped her [Medea’s] hand and in low tones besought her aid and promised marriage ... Then by the pure rites of Triformis [three-bodied Hecate] and by whatever Power dwelt in that grove he swore, and by her father’s father [Helios the sun] who sees all the world, and by his triumphs and his perils passed. Then she was sure; and straight the magic herbs she gave into his hands and taught their use [making him invulnerable to fire]."

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.162 "In the deep stillness of the midnight hour ... she [Medea] stretched her arms to the stars ... O Nox [Nyx the Night], Mother of Mysteries, and all ye golden Astra (Stars) who with Luna [selene the Moon] succeed the fires of day, and thou, divine triceps (three-formed) Hecate, who knowest all my enterprises and dost fortify the arts of magic."

 

From Horace, Epode V "Then cruel Canidia [the witch] gnawing her short thumb nail with her rotten tooth-- what did she say and to what did she remain silent? “Oh faithful witnesses of my affairs, Night and Diana, who rules the silence when sacred mysteries are preformed, now, now come, and now turn your wrath and divine will against my enemies.

 

 

From Lucan B.C. 6: 700-01 “Persephone, who is the third and lowest aspect of our [the witches’] goddess Hekate…”

 

We also have, of course, a longstanding tradition in which Hecate is known as the goddess of witchcraft. Here are some notes on the witch Medea that mentions a goddess and Medea as a priestess (a religious connotation).

 

MEDEA – NOTES

 

From: The Cult of the Greek States, by Lewis R. Farnell. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1896

 

The Artemis of colchos, with whom the legend couples the name of Medea, is a goddess of magical incantations and of the arts of poisoning. In the narrative of Diodorus Siculus *, Medea tells Pelias that her tutelary goddess has come to him from Colchis ' riding upon serpents'; and she names her Artemis, though this mode of travelling is suitable only for Hekate, of whom Medea is the priestess and perhaps the ' double ' ''. – page 505

 

FROM: The Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th edition, volume XVIII. New York: The Encyclopedia Britannica Company, 1911 Medea was honoured as a goddess at Corinth, and was said to have become the wife of Achilles in the Elysian fields. The chief seat of her cult, however, was Thessaly, which was always regarded as the home of magic. As time went on her character was less favourably described. In the tale of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours. Some authorities regard Medea as a lunar divinity, but the ancient conception of her as a Thessalian sorceress is probably correct. – page 19

 

From: A Handbook of Mythology, by E.M. Berens. New York: Maynard, Merrill, & Co., 1931 Argus explained to Jason all the difficulties of the superhuman task which lay before him, and pronounced it as his opinion that the only means by which success was possible was to enlist the assistance of the Princess Medea, who was a priestess of Hecate, and a great enchantress. – page 224

 

 

 

FROM: The Works of Greek and Roman Poets. London: Suttaby, Evance and Fox, 1813 The swearing by Hecate was peculiarly proper in Medea, on account of her being a Colchian, and addicted to magic rites, over which Hecate presided; besides, Medea was priestess of Hecate. – page 152

 

FROM: Tales of Troy and Greece, by Andrew Lang. New York: Longman’s, Green, and Co., 1912 Then they came to the palace, where King Jietes lived, with his young son Absyrtus, and his daughter Chalciope, who had been the wife of Phrixus, and his younger daughter, Medea, who was a witch, and the priestess of Brimo, a dreadful goddess. – page 191

 

 

 

FROM EURIPIDES: MEDEA Verse 420 -425: I swear by my mistress who I worship most of all and took as my ally long ago, Hecate.

 

Well now there ya go!! roflhard.gif

 

I knew that there were Gods/Goddesses LONG before the Christian Invasions throughout Europe, how else would one explain the creating of Saints out of Pagan Gods/Goddesses like Brigid and the like?? The people REFUSED to let her go!

I didn't have a list of credible references on hand to list, but the above is enough proof for the pudding I would say!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, not a problem. Here are a few examples:

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.74 "To the ancient shrine of Hecate Perseis [daughter of Perses], deep in the forest in a shady grove, she [the witch Medea] made her way [to meet with Jason] ... [Jason] grasped her [Medea’s] hand and in low tones besought her aid and promised marriage ... Then by the pure rites of Triformis [three-bodied Hecate] and by whatever Power dwelt in that grove he swore, and by her father’s father [Helios the sun] who sees all the world, and by his triumphs and his perils passed. Then she was sure; and straight the magic herbs she gave into his hands and taught their use [making him invulnerable to fire]."

 

From - Ovid, Metamorphoses 7.162 "In the deep stillness of the midnight hour ... she [Medea] stretched her arms to the stars ... O Nox [Nyx the Night], Mother of Mysteries, and all ye golden Astra (Stars) who with Luna [selene the Moon] succeed the fires of day, and thou, divine triceps (three-formed) Hecate, who knowest all my enterprises and dost fortify the arts of magic."

 

From Horace, Epode V "Then cruel Canidia [the witch] gnawing her short thumb nail with her rotten tooth-- what did she say and to what did she remain silent? “Oh faithful witnesses of my affairs, Night and Diana, who rules the silence when sacred mysteries are preformed, now, now come, and now turn your wrath and divine will against my enemies.

 

 

From Lucan B.C. 6: 700-01 “Persephone, who is the third and lowest aspect of our [the witches’] goddess Hekate…”

 

We also have, of course, a longstanding tradition in which Hecate is known as the goddess of witchcraft. Here are some notes on the witch Medea that mentions a goddess and Medea as a priestess (a religious connotation).

 

MEDEA – NOTES

 

From: The Cult of the Greek States, by Lewis R. Farnell. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1896

 

The Artemis of colchos, with whom the legend couples the name of Medea, is a goddess of magical incantations and of the arts of poisoning. In the narrative of Diodorus Siculus *, Medea tells Pelias that her tutelary goddess has come to him from Colchis ' riding upon serpents'; and she names her Artemis, though this mode of travelling is suitable only for Hekate, of whom Medea is the priestess and perhaps the ' double ' ''. – page 505

 

FROM: The Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th edition, volume XVIII. New York: The Encyclopedia Britannica Company, 1911 Medea was honoured as a goddess at Corinth, and was said to have become the wife of Achilles in the Elysian fields. The chief seat of her cult, however, was Thessaly, which was always regarded as the home of magic. As time went on her character was less favourably described. In the tale of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours. Some authorities regard Medea as a lunar divinity, but the ancient conception of her as a Thessalian sorceress is probably correct. – page 19

 

From: A Handbook of Mythology, by E.M. Berens. New York: Maynard, Merrill, & Co., 1931 Argus explained to Jason all the difficulties of the superhuman task which lay before him, and pronounced it as his opinion that the only means by which success was possible was to enlist the assistance of the Princess Medea, who was a priestess of Hecate, and a great enchantress. – page 224

 

 

 

FROM: The Works of Greek and Roman Poets. London: Suttaby, Evance and Fox, 1813 The swearing by Hecate was peculiarly proper in Medea, on account of her being a Colchian, and addicted to magic rites, over which Hecate presided; besides, Medea was priestess of Hecate. – page 152

 

FROM: Tales of Troy and Greece, by Andrew Lang. New York: Longman’s, Green, and Co., 1912 Then they came to the palace, where King Jietes lived, with his young son Absyrtus, and his daughter Chalciope, who had been the wife of Phrixus, and his younger daughter, Medea, who was a witch, and the priestess of Brimo, a dreadful goddess. – page 191

 

 

 

FROM EURIPIDES: MEDEA Verse 420 -425: I swear by my mistress who I worship most of all and took as my ally long ago, Hecate.

 

Thanks for the sources, but I was wondering if there are any other besides Greek mythology.

 

I am not into Deity, so have not done a lot of research, but I did come up with the book Early Modern European Witchcraft (edited by Ankarloo & Henningsen, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993) that depicts a Sabbat wherein a King and Queen preside in connection with Witchcraft, and in other research, Priapus is the first god mentioned in connection with Witches in pre-Christian writings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the sources, but I was wondering if there are any other besides Greek mythology.

 

I am not into Deity, so have not done a lot of research, but I did come up with the book Early Modern European Witchcraft (edited by Ankarloo & Henningsen, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993) that depicts a Sabbat wherein a King and Queen preside in connection with Witchcraft, and in other research, Priapus is the first god mentioned in connection with Witches in pre-Christian writings.

 

i gave the southern European sources because they're the oldest.documentations. But outside of that we do have Witchcraft trial transcripts from practically all regions of Europe, and the British isles, in which goddess names appear. Grimassi talks about them in the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stumbled on this thread today over at Mystic Wicks about Old World Witchcraft- http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?254614-Old-World-Witchcraft&p=4671860#post4671860 The OP sounds a lot like what ST has been saying here but I'm going to keep an eye on the thread to see if anymore reviews come about.

 

I also happened upon a thread in Grimassi's defense over there with some interesting stuff- http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?225630-Misquoth-the-Raven-Nevermore

 

Still not sold on Grimassi and in large part because of the amount of pushing (bordering on trolling) he does on internet forums promoting his work and name but that certainly doesn't speak for his experience or works. I'm more than willing to give him the benefit of the doubt even if I don't appreciate his tactics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stumbled on this thread today over at Mystic Wicks about Old World Witchcraft- http://mysticwicks.c...860#post4671860 The OP sounds a lot like what ST has been saying here but I'm going to keep an eye on the thread to see if anymore reviews come about.

 

I also happened upon a thread in Grimassi's defense over there with some interesting stuff- http://mysticwicks.c...Raven-Nevermore

 

Still not sold on Grimassi and in large part because of the amount of pushing (bordering on trolling) he does on internet forums promoting his work and name but that certainly doesn't speak for his experience or works. I'm more than willing to give him the benefit of the doubt even if I don't appreciate his tactics.

 

 

Hmmm...personally I've not seen him much on the Internet forums, but perhaps you've been where I haven't. I've seen him pop up sometimes, briefly, to dispel misinformation about himself and his work, but I think most people would do so as well. And I think anyone who makes a living as an author doesn't want to hide his or her work from the public, so I'm not sure why that would be regarded negatively. I'm curious, are you annoyed by people who post often about what they want to talk about or is it just Grimassi that irritates you?

 

Thanks for posting the link on Mystic Wicks. It's from a sister of mine (in spirit) who used to be one of Grimassi's research assistants. We just reconnected, and it looks like she didn't waste any time after we spoke! Grimassi has a page over there on Mysticwicks, and some of his people are still members, or so I'm told.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm curious, are you annoyed by people who post often about what they want to talk about or is it just Grimassi that irritates you?

 

I'm not sure exactly how to take this. What would give you the idea that I am "annoyed" by someone who wants to talk about what they would like? I have no issue with that. I do have an issue with people spamming me with their opinion wrapped up as fact, simply because I am interested in fact not someone patting themselves on the back. Grimassi has been on my radar because of his insistance on forum/thread crashing to "set the record straight" when in truth he has just been talking himself up vs. providing any new or useful information. BUT I am not on every single forum every single second of the day. This is just what I have seen of him here and there. At first I could just say it was about defending his work and himself from misconceptions but it does cross over that line, at least in my opinion.

 

Grimassi has a page over there on Mysticwicks, and some of his people are still members, or so I'm told.

 

Ah, you just answered a question of mine. Thanks!

 

 

 

Grimassi has over 1,000 posts at MysticWicks. You may not see him much on forums but he certainly has a presence on some of them. The one I am most familiar with him on is the Traditional Witchcraft forum that is now closed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grimassi has over 1,000 posts at MysticWicks. You may not see him much on forums but he certainly has a presence on some of them. The one I am most familiar with him on is the Traditional Witchcraft forum that is now closed.

 

Yeah, because he was given a page over there on Mysticwicks (an author page) I guess it makes sense that he would post there. I looked at his bio and it says he joined in 2003. So I'm surprised that after 8 years of him being there that he has only 1000 or so posts. I'd think he'd take better advantage of the opportunity (especially in light of the way you portray his presence on Internet forums).

 

Oh, and I was also on the Traditional Witchcraft forum that is now closed, and Grimassi rarely posted there at all. Odd.

 

I'm not sure exactly how to take this. What would give you the idea that I am "annoyed" by someone who wants to talk about what they would like? I have no issue with that. I do have an issue with people spamming me with their opinion wrapped up as fact, simply because I am interested in fact not someone patting themselves on the back. Grimassi has been on my radar because of his insistance on forum/thread crashing to "set the record straight" when in truth he has just been talking himself up vs. providing any new or useful information. BUT I am not on every single forum every single second of the day. This is just what I have seen of him here and there. At first I could just say it was about defending his work and himself from misconceptions but it does cross over that line, at least in my opinion.

 

Thanks for the reply. We see the man differently, that much is clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, because he was given a page over there on Mysticwicks (an author page) I guess it makes sense that he would post there. I looked at his bio and it says he joined in 2003. So I'm surprised that after 8 years of him being there that he has only 1000 or so posts. I'd think he'd take better advantage of the opportunity (especially in light of the way you portray his presence on Internet forums).

 

Oh, and I was also on the Traditional Witchcraft forum that is now closed, and Grimassi rarely posted there at all. Odd.

 

I never said he was all over the place at all times I was only expressing my opinion of what I have seen of him. I don't think authors should never post on forums, that's for sure, I just think that authors and those who like them need to understand that some people are not going to agree with what they put out. It seems that RG and his followers are having a hard time swallowing that pill and I find that a bit ridiculous. That's all I was getting at. I don't know RG personally, I have only read one of his books, I certainly can't comment on him as a whole nor am I trying to. My comments above were based on what I have seen of him online.

 

That all said don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. Obviously RG has a lot to offer some people through his work. I am more than willing to entertain the idea that I could be one of those people.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never said he was all over the place at all times I was only expressing my opinion of what I have seen of him. I don't think authors should never post on forums, that's for sure, I just think that authors and those who like them need to understand that some people are not going to agree with what they put out. It seems that RG and his followers are having a hard time swallowing that pill and I find that a bit ridiculous. That's all I was getting at. I don't know RG personally, I have only read one of his books, I certainly can't comment on him as a whole nor am I trying to. My comments above were based on what I have seen of him online.

 

That all said don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. Obviously RG has a lot to offer some people through his work. I am more than willing to entertain the idea that I could be one of those people.

 

 

 

I hope we're not creating friction between us here. I certainly don't want that.

 

From my understanding, Grimassi's supporters don't have a problem with anyone not buying Grimassi's position on anything. Instead they appear to respond to misinformation and false allegations, which is a different matter all together. I read a post from Grimassi once in which he stated that he respects negative reviews of his books if they have valid points and are well founded. So contrary opinions don't seem to be a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope we're not creating friction between us here. I certainly don't want that.

 

Nor do I.

 

Thank you for taking the time to respond to me. I think it could easily just be a matter of seeing things play out online through different eyes at different times.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i gave the southern European sources because they're the oldest.documentations. But outside of that we do have Witchcraft trial transcripts from practically all regions of Europe, and the British isles, in which goddess names appear. Grimassi talks about them in the book.

 

I think the Witchcraft trial transcripts are in the Christian era, where the far greater majority of transcripts would indicate the devil as the witches deity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Witchcraft trial transcripts are in the Christian era, where the far greater majority of transcripts would indicate the devil as the witches deity.

 

Indeed they do, and in the cases where the accused states that she worshiped a goddess, the Inquisitors respond by asking how many times did the Devil mislead the person into believing this. Historians Ginzburg and Pocs both document this tactic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Witchcraft trial transcripts are in the Christian era, where the far greater majority of transcripts would indicate the devil as the witches deity.

 

 

Indeed they do, and in the cases where the accused states that she worshiped a goddess, the Inquisitors respond by asking how many times did the Devil mislead the person into believing this. Historians Ginzburg and Pocs both document this tactic.

 

I may be reading this wrong and if so, please forgive me.

 

AM are you looking for a God/Goddess that solely belongs to the Witch??

 

Other then Hecate, I don't recall ever reading of any "God/Goddess" OF OR FOR the witches.

 

It is my impression that the witches of the day would be a person like any other believing in the same God/Goddesses as their community depending on what the popular belief system was at that time. Perhaps not in the same way.....

 

I'm not so sure about an actual God/Goddess set aside for any other pantheon.

 

Just my thoughts.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...