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Learning Through Intuition


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#21 Blacksmith

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 06:51 PM

My visions and intuitions have been guiding for me, but one cannot intuit an entire path. It is good to have teachers too, good to seek out others that can guide you. Then you can use your intuition to determine if this person is the right teacher for you and to intuit how to do workings that at first may seem over your head. I still seek teachers, but I don't see "traditional witchcraft" as confined to what the Celts or Norse may or may not have done. I think many witches get stuck on an image and this causes stagnation. It is a very slow process to try to intuit an entire tradition. There are aspects of my journey that do require book work and intuition in the sense of determining the truths the author is expressing (and if the author is full of shit). Developing intuition is essential to the practice of witchcraft, but it should be used in combination with real life experiences with others. Being a solitary witch that learns only from books and their intuition about books, is not traditional witchcraft. I am not directing this at anyone in particular, I don't really know the extent of other folk's journey here, but just saying in general, as I see this often and hear it often from some clients. At no point in history was there a traditional witch that read books and had gut feelings about what was written.

So, intuition used correctly and with others is certainly essential to success in witchcraft. Intuition devoid of the experience of a real teacher is lacking in importance. The experiences and knowledge gained from a teacher that is part of a several thousand year old path that never died, but has evolved with the times, cannot be compared to the arm chair witch, reading and having gut feelings. Again, it is like trying to reinvent witchcraft. There is a sharply defined difference between using intuition to try to learn a path and using intuition as part of the path. I hope that sheds some light for some on the two edged sword that is intuition. If intuition is used in stagnant waters, the witch will become stagnant, but if in rivers that have flowed pure for thousands of years, there cannot be stagnation.

-- Blacksmith


#22 Jevne

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 07:18 PM

My visions and intuitions have been guiding for me, but one cannot intuit an entire path. It is good to have teachers too, good to seek out others that can guide you. Then you can use your intuition to determine if this person is the right teacher for you and to intuit how to do workings that at first may seem over your head. I still seek teachers, but I don't see "traditional witchcraft" as confined to what the Celts or Norse may or may not have done. I think many witches get stuck on an image and this causes stagnation. It is a very slow process to try to intuit an entire tradition. There are aspects of my journey that do require book work and intuition in the sense of determining the truths the author is expressing (and if the author is full of shit). Developing intuition is essential to the practice of witchcraft, but it should be used in combination with real life experiences with others. Being a solitary witch that learns only from books and their intuition about books, is not traditional witchcraft. I am not directing this at anyone in particular, I don't really know the extent of other folk's journey here, but just saying in general, as I see this often and hear it often from some clients. At no point in history was there a traditional witch that read books and had gut feelings about what was written.

So, intuition used correctly and with others is certainly essential to success in witchcraft. Intuition devoid of the experience of a real teacher is lacking in importance. The experiences and knowledge gained from a teacher that is part of a several thousand year old path that never died, but has evolved with the times, cannot be compared to the arm chair witch, reading and having gut feelings. Again, it is like trying to reinvent witchcraft. There is a sharply defined difference between using intuition to try to learn a path and using intuition as part of the path. I hope that sheds some light for some on the two edged sword that is intuition. If intuition is used in stagnant waters, the witch will become stagnant, but if in rivers that have flowed pure for thousands of years, there cannot be stagnation.

-- Blacksmith


While I imagine it will not be a particularly popular response, I agree with your assessment. The rebuttal, of course, will be . . . What does one do when they do not have access to a "real" teacher? The answer is often that they turn to books, which is fine, but I am of the opinion that books are only beneficial, if the information contained within serves as a catalyst to encourage further growth; encourages one to seek out the teacher. Knowledge without application is nothing, but words on a page.

Not long ago, a seeker brought up this same subject by asking if you can just do whatever you feel like and still call it Traditional Witchcraft. I have an opinion, of course, but . . .

Jevne


#23 Marabet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 07:25 PM

I am of the opinion that books are only beneficial, if the information contained within serves as a catalyst to encourage further growth; encourages one to seek out the teacher. Knowledge without application is nothing, but words on a page.

I like this, J.

Not long ago, a seeker brought up this same subject by asking if you can just do whatever you feel like and still call it Traditional Witchcraft.


Can you eat whatever you feel like and be a vegetarian?

I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#24 Marabet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 07:43 PM

Going off of the responses so far would it be safe to say that intuition alone isn't enough (of course) but also knowledge gained from other's experiences, history, etc? This can come in the form of books as well as teachers. From the last two comments (not including my own) I am guessing that the teacher issue is a hot one. I'm not sure I buy that a teacher in the literal sense of living person to living person is 100% needed unless you are embarking on a very particular tradition (say, Feri). Of course I can completely see the benefit and, dare I say, potential superiority of that method. Still it seems what it comes down to is not putting all of your eggs into one basket. Intuition, book learnin', teachers... none of these alone will provide one with what is needed. It seems from the Advice thread that some have tried that route, relying too much on one over the other, and has made things more difficult for themselves. Would that be fair to say?

I am picking on intuition right now because it seems it is talked about the least in any real concrete way with regards to learning/walking the path where books and teachers have been debated at length. This could quite possibly be because intuition is a bit of a given in any path but it also seems to be both the whipping boy and the one that got away. The whipping boy in that we hear about how important it is to study study study and learn from someone else while looking down our nose at "feelings" leading the way and the one who got away in that we then seem to look back and think "I should have followed my gut more".

So from what I can gather the key points of intuition are...
  • Checks and balances
  • Always question it/yourself
  • Best used alongside other things not on it's own
  • At the end of the day follow your gut

Looking at what I have gleaned it seems this works for just about everything!

Sorry for such a disjointed post. I am thinking as I type.

I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#25 Marabet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 07:50 PM

Serial posting to add a far better title for this thread would have been "Learning Aided By Intuition"
I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#26 Whiterose

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 08:06 PM

Maggie, I like the fact that you can read everyone's response and think critically about everything said and then state what you have learned. It is not too often a seeker does this, as many expect to be spoon fed or to pick and choose the answers they like better while ignoring the wisdom in the "not so popular responses". This post impressed me and so you have my vote.

#27 Honeythorn

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 08:25 PM

What does one do when they do not have access to a "real" teacher?


Which is exactly my rebuttal. What does one like myself and others like me do? I have no teacher other than myself and books/internet.

And even there lie problems. You cannot intuit or teach yourself some method, practise or working you have never heard of. One can make it up of course, but I have noticed that seems to be somewhat looked down upon. ( not only here )

One could look for such a thing in a book certainly. But that also seems rather looked down upon at times.

Also, if you don't know what particular thing you wish to search for with regards to reading material, finding it in a book would be something of a problem if you don't know what book you're after, let alone have the name of a good author. And when you find such a book, one then has to debate on spending hard earned money on something that may contain a load of new age things which are of no use and do not resonate with what one is trying to achieve.


I have see it hinted at or intimated that not having someone to teach you , means that you may be "playing" or that what you achieve may not be quite as powerful as someone who has had tuition.


You may wish to consider that someone somewhere back through the history of humanity, had no teacher. Someone somewhere simply made something up, found that it worked or was useful, and passed that on ( and not always to someone they were related to either )

Everything known now about witchcraft, all the teachings of various paths and peoples, all of it started somewhere with one or two people simply making it up as they felt was right for the time and situation. Someone had to start from nothing, with only their intuition .



Every tradition or style has it's origins in someone who started it. Someone who needed to get shit done and did it using what they had to hands and within. No teacher or tradition passed down to them , just what was around them

I get confused at times. I see confilcting opinions. I've see it said ( approximately this is not verbatim ) that one must learn from one's own feelings and experiences, and that for example trying out a method, spell or working written or given by someone else will mean that it will not have the same effect for you.

Yet those who are taught by others or family, who have had workings and spells and rites passed down ( which will have been at some point in time, made up by someone ) are doing exactly that. Using methods used by those before them, related or otherwise. It's someone else's method, someone elses spell or working. And those it is passed on to may alter or modify it to suit their own situation or need. And so the outcome or experience will be different for them.

Don't we who have no real life tutor do the same when we try something from a book or website? To be fair, it's all we can do.

Edited by Honeythorn, 11 September 2011 - 08:29 PM.


#28 Whiterose

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 08:48 PM

While I imagine it will not be a particularly popular response, I agree with your assessment. The rebuttal, of course, will be . . . What does one do when they do not have access to a "real" teacher? The answer is often that they turn to books, which is fine, but I am of the opinion that books are only beneficial, if the information contained within serves as a catalyst to encourage further growth; encourages one to seek out the teacher. Knowledge without application is nothing, but words on a page.

Not long ago, a seeker brought up this same subject by asking if you can just do whatever you feel like and still call it Traditional Witchcraft. I have an opinion, of course, but . . .

Jevne



Honeythorn,

What I think is being said here is that you can not ONLY learn from books. If you are confused and lost then maybe you should seek out a teacher. You can find a teacher in the most unlikely of places, you don't have to put out a classified ad or stalk an author (for an example). I found one of my best teachers in college. He actually was a proffesor teaching history, of all things. You just need to be open to experiences and go where the current takes you. Some people are blessed to have a teacher right in their home, others need to look harder. I think once you step back from the "I need a teacher mentality" and really try to figure some things out, one will come. That is just my opinion of course. Take from it what you will.


#29 8people

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 09:22 PM

One does not need a name for an action for the action to be true.

I do not know if there is a term for predicting weather based on certain plants and physical reactions prior to phenomina but still something I do. I didn't know the term gnosis or meditation until doing it for a while either.

Having tuition does lend a strength (even though the things I have recieved tuition in tend to be things frowned upon ;)) it's a direct conduit of knowledge that can tailor itself to your needs and abilities. It is often a method that adapts and advances with your own experience and practices whereas a book cannot stop itself from revealing chapters that are out of reach or not of relevant use - a book can't reprhrase what's written on its pages to clarify things.

Through this forum alone it is very clear that the written language has a miriad of undertones and reflects that which both the typist and reader sense at the time. Where one reads offense, another reads wisdom. And that is within often a small selection of paragraphs - analytical understanding is a poorly taught trait in schools and general reading which is beneficial for absorbing the most from a book, something that assists you in 'getting the bang for your buck' as they say.

I would, personally, argue that someone just 'made stuff up' - whilst that may be a proportion of initial workings and unfortunately a large marketable venture in todays pagan and magical publishings - things that were used and passed down were more akin to experiments, conclusions and analysis. Like any other science or practice.

Try things. If they work, record and refine them. If they do not record and describe them separately. You may find later down the road that it will be useful for another venture.
Make conclusions based on practice, be critical and practical. Yet avoid settling, I was fortunate that when I needed guidance or was free from any other duties tutors found me (I do have the most curious balance of luck, however) others had the grace to be within a family unit such as Jevne who could impart knowledge, even further are people such as Blacksmith who have searched and worked and made it their magnum opus to study.

What channels have you attempted in trying to locate further study? Did a brief search but couldn't turn up any topics regarding finding teachers - maybe if a few people shared in a separate topic it might help people get an idea where to start when they need someone to help guide them a little further.


#30 Marabet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 09:41 PM

I would, personally, argue that someone just 'made stuff up' - whilst that may be a proportion of initial workings and unfortunately a large marketable venture in todays pagan and magical publishings - things that were used and passed down were more akin to experiments, conclusions and analysis. Like any other science or practice.

Try things. If they work, record and refine them. If they do not record and describe them separately.

Love this.


I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#31 Honeythorn

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 10:18 PM

Ah, but making it up, is precisely what an experiment is. Taking quantities of X and Y ( and maybe H and p with a little z ) putting them together and experiencing the outcome. Wether it be an explosion, implosion, or gooey mess that happens to work excellently on burns.

Sometimes you have a good inkling of what the result will be based on it's components, sometimes you don't, often it will surprise you and not in the way you expect it to!!!

Experiment basically just sounds better and more professional than making it up, but that is what it is at the heart of it.

Some of history's greatest and worst discoveries have been made by someone just trying stuff out and making it up as they go along.

Edited by Honeythorn, 11 September 2011 - 10:21 PM.


#32 Michele

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 10:48 PM

I personally think books have relevance if you use them as a catalyst or "interactivly." To read them and digest information and nothing else is armchair carft. To read them and acrually work within the framwork of the book to see what happens, how it sits with you, etc., is interactive and gets one out of the chair. (Some) teachers can be priceless, especially when working with deeper things and/or dangerous things. To have a sounding board to help one determine if one is off in left field, or to have one who can see when one is getting into trouble and help pull one out. But I think those teachers are few and far between. And usually the student will hit a point where they can learn no more from their mortal teacher. And that brings me to the second point - from the responses it seems that everyone thinks teachers must be human, incarnated people. There are many tales of the witch learning and being taught by his or her familiars, whether faery, angelic, demonic, or what-have-you. How many on here have ever dreamed a chant, a ritual, a specific mixture of herbs or potions? Where do you think that came from? Personal intuition, remembering something you'd read in a book and forgot about, your "deeper self", or even a non-incarnated "teacher?"

M


#33 CelticGypsy

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 10:52 PM

Ah, but making it up, is precisely what an experiment is. Taking quantities of X and Y ( and maybe H and p with a little z ) putting them together and experiencing the outcome. Wether it be an explosion, implosion, or gooey mess that happens to work excellently on burns.

Sometimes you have a good inkling of what the result will be based on it's components, sometimes you don't, often it will surprise you and not in the way you expect it to!!!

Experiment basically just sounds better and more professional than making it up, but that is what it is at the heart of it.

Some of history's greatest and worst discoveries have been made by someone just trying stuff out and making it up as they go along.


Simply put, there is a yes here. This example I will put out there is a simple example from "experimenting", lets not run off on a tangent with it, it's just an example of mine.

Chocolate Cupcakes: When I add just a little bit of coffee to the chocolate mixture, intead of water used as a liquid. I don't know what happens, I don't see a difference in the batter, but the end results is the cocoa in the chocolate batter becomes " alive " with a richer flavor. There must be something that happens within the baking of them. I've made them side by side, the ones with coffee and the ones with water, and there is a difference by far. Not in looks, but in taste. A Witch is not only a Practitioner, a Witch is an Alchemist, in my humble opinion.

Regards,
Gypsy

" The last thing you wanted a Witch to do is get bored and start making her own amusements, because Witches sometimes have erratically famous ideas about what was amusing "

 

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#34 Anara

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 11:26 PM

Has this been, more or less, true for you on your Traditional Path? I noticed a theme in the thread Advice You Would Give Your Newb Self that "follow your intuition" is a constant answer. I have also seen this when reading around the internet about Traditional Witchcraft (more about intuition than any set practice/dogma). If you learned primarily through your intuition what was your process? Did you reach for it (through meditation, observation, etc etc)? Did you read up on Traditional paths and then see what "felt right"? Was some of this given to you in dream, vision, etc etc?


I have learned primarily through my intuition, but you see, I learn through my intuition in every aspect of my life- witchcraft is no different than any other aspect of life for me; it's just my nature. In fact, my intuition has saved my butt at least a few times-it's proven itself to be reliable for me, so I trust it. No, my intuition is not always correct - or rather-there are times I have "misinterpreted" what I am feeling, as I have seen stated in another thread, but I do my best to figure out why I misinterpreted it and try not to make the same mistake again.

Some of what I believe has been through books only -things that "felt" right and really resonated with me through reading, some things have come to me through meditation, observation, contemplation, some things have even initially come to me through spirits and then were reinforced through reading later. Then there is the benefit of trial and error, of course. Above all though, it has been my own intuition that has guided me, even when dealing with spirits. If something does not feel right, I go with that. The same is true in the mundane world.

Having said all of that, I do agree that there is only so much you can learn by yourself, and I think you will stagnate eventually if you only learn from your own experiences. No one person knows everything, right?? I believe that you can learn something from everyone, anywhere... and, of course, teachers are there for a reason. Even there though, finding the right teacher when learning a particular tradition is important. I am sure if I ever tried to find a teacher, I would tread carefully while searching.

Of course, I also do not believe that every teacher will come from this world, and for that reason, am very much in agreement with Michele's post.

I also agree with Celtic Gypsy here- great analogy. :)

~Ruby

Edited by ruby, 11 September 2011 - 11:32 PM.

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#35 Marabet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 11:46 PM

Michele touched on some things with regards to teachers that I have been thinking about. Does a teacher really have to be a living person that has x amount of experience or can your higher self be your teacher, spirit guides, your own experience, even intuition? As I said before I am not sold on the idea that a teacher is 100% necessary unless it is a very specific tradition. By that I meant the literal alive human being sitting before you teaching you their ways. But can't a teacher look like more than just that?

Then there is that not all teachers are good teachers. Wouldn't it be fair to say that a who learned through good active book study with intuitive practice thrown in could have a better experience and be more adept (however we can gauge that) than one who was taught by a bad teacher? That seems reasonable to me.

I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#36 Blacksmith

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 01:15 AM

Books and internet are of course a great asset as we have access to practices and histories more than any other generation of witches before us. There are teachers...but sometimes you may have to travel. You may have to put effort into the path. I have studied with teachers in 4 states now and am in communication with another in Brazil at the moment. I certainly agree that finding a teacher is really about being ready for one. Things aren't like they used to be...you can't go down the dirt trail to the witches hut and tell her/him that you have abilities or visions and start your training. On the other hand we have teachers available to us world wide now. So, yes...you can find a teacher.

I think part of the issue here is why find a teacher? I think the answer to that varies depending on both person and path. For me I wanted answers and connection to others. I also wanted to learn the old ways in a living tradition. I sought to better understand and work with the spirits that I work with. I wanted to have someone else to talk to that was like me. I didn't seek out a specific path, it just happened. My path is still growing and I am still learning. For me the internet and books came in handy when exploring these paths. I needed to know who is fake and who is authentic before I dedicate my resources to study under them. I use intuition to determine if they are authentic when they go into areas that are new to me. I also use intuition to determine if a path and teacher is right for me.

A witch can certainly learn quite a bit on their own, but you can't circulate energy with a book or a web page. You can't call the spirits together with a book. Most importantly you can't learn from the vast experiences and knowledge an authentic teacher has attained. There are two other issues I see here as well. One, there is a difference for a witch that has a great deal of natural power and ability and one that must seek it. Neither one is less authentic, but they do create different paths for the witch and this may also direct the entire journey. Second, I understand that not everyone is inclined to dedicate themselves 100% to the path. For me, my entire life revolves around my path. I know though that others have other concerns, such as family and a non-witchy career to provide for that family, for example.

I'm not saying everyone must have a teacher or their not a witch, but there are certainly many benefits to having a teacher. I have natural ability, but I am confident that I have been able to go much deeper because I have learned and worked with others like me. What I am saying, is that if someone picks up Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft and thinks they are suddenly a witch....well

Lastly, I like your curiosity and open mindedness, it will take you far.

-- Blacksmith


#37 Autumn Moon

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 02:24 AM

Sean Laurent (2009) wrote an article called "Gender Roles and Empathic Accuracy: The Role of Communion in Reading Minds" for Vol. 60 Issue 5/6 for the Journal, Sex Roles. Research has shown that women are slightly more intuitive when it comes to issues involving people (i.e. relationships). Women are socialized to be more in-tune with others, while men are believed to be socialized to focus on problems and solutions, as opposed to people. This generalization will, of course, not apply to all individuals, but in situations involving other people, women do seem to have a slight advantage statistically.

In keeping with this same line of reasoning, social learning theorists, such as those following the research of Albert Bandera (1972), imply that women have been socialized to prefer “communal professions”; the implication being that despite employer and educational providers’ efforts to the contrary, women will continue to gravitate toward service- and relationship-oriented organizations (Weiten, 2008; Feldman, 2008, p. 503). Indicating, that perhaps some women grow stronger in their intuitive abilities, simply by having a greater number and scope of personal and professional opportunities to utilize the skills.

Jevne

Feldman, R. (2008). Development across the lifespan. (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Weiten, W. (2008). Psychology: Themes and variations (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.


Intuiton plays a part in other professions traditionally held more by men, such as the police service, fire service etc. I think that one can develop certain types of intuition, as you say, and that there can be some gender differences on what intuition is being used for. But my point was that ime
I think genders are pretty much equal when it comes to having intuition.

I think I can agree that generally (do not like that word) people can gravitate to a certain type of profession, BUT culture and social learning may have more to do with that than genetics.

Statistics can be manipulated way too much to suit the bias of the researcher.

The only thing I have to say about stereotyping is that it leads to tunnel/myopic vision for the most part. Are there some general (there's that word again) differences in aptitudes between the genders...people who are supposed experts would have us believe so.


#38 Jevne

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 04:30 AM

Intuiton plays a part in other professions traditionally held more by men, such as the police service, fire service etc. I think that one can develop certain types of intuition, as you say, and that there can be some gender differences on what intuition is being used for. But my point was that ime
I think genders are pretty much equal when it comes to having intuition.

I think I can agree that generally (do not like that word) people can gravitate to a certain type of profession, BUT culture and social learning may have more to do with that than genetics.

Statistics can be manipulated way too much to suit the bias of the researcher.

The only thing I have to say about stereotyping is that it leads to tunnel/myopic vision for the most part. Are there some general (there's that word again) differences in aptitudes between the genders...people who are supposed experts would have us believe so.


True . . . statistics can be manipulated to say pretty much whatever people want them to say; however, I'm speaking of actual scientists, who get called out by their peers quickly if they try to fudge things. For every study indicating that women have more intuition than men, there was of course another study saying that one was wrong or more accurately incomplete. Truth is that the differences are so small, as to not really be differences at all, so it seems that the researchers turned their attention to why society believes the generalizations so strongly.

Like you said, the evidence is often highly suspect on both sides of the issue for a variety of reasons, but the stereotypes persists. So, why is that?

People also believe that men are better at math than women; however, the evidence doesn't back that up either. Across the general population, women score just as well, if not better, on mathematical exams, as their male counterparts. Yet, I still hate math. Some people also continue to believe that if you go outside when it is cold, you will get a cold, but that isn't true. Cold weather doesn't make you sick. Sick people make you sick. Yet, I'll still tell the kids to bundle up when outside, so they don't catch cold. (Crazy, eh?)

Not everyone is (or even wants to be a scientist), so they must base their perceptions entirely on their own experiences. It would probably be more accurate for me (or Michele) to say that the women in our lives are more intuitive than the men in our lives. Now, the scientist in me knows that is not true for all women or men, but that is our experience. (Sorry, to put words in your mouth, M, but making a point.)

So, you are right, it is a generalization. Something that we should be aware of . . .

Jevne


#39 Brigid

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 05:26 AM

This is a very interesting thread, it points to a lot of ideas.

First I don't believe you can learn witchcraft threw intuition alone, experience, trail and error, documented accounts as with any science needs to be done, worked and lived.

Second, books, I have yet to find one that truly relates to TW, I have found some interesting books, I have many, but none that completely resonate with me, I take what does and leave out the rest. I have given up on the book end of it to be honest because I am always disappointed.
I don't believe that the "old craft" has been put into writing, if I'm wrong, please let me know.

Teachers - this is a very touchy subject especially if you live in the US. I have searched extensively to find TW witches in my state, ANYWHERE in my state and all I find is Wicca.
Therefore I have no "formal training" , I wish that I did, but I simply don't.

But is there not another form or training? Are there not ancestors, spirit guides or perhaps visions of the past that can also show us the way?

I am of the belief that witches are born, it's an innate pull towards the craft, perhaps threw glimpses of a past life, bloodline that we don't know of, or something more powerful then we can understand.

I agree that being raised or trained by a witch with a long history within family traditions is a gift and I suppose this of course would make for a more powerful witch, but does that leave the rest of us as insignificant? I think not. Perhaps not as powerful, but non the less, we are still witches in our own right.

Being a witch to me is a frame of mind, a way of life, the "knowing" if you will. It is something that is inside you. If you are blessed with the tutelage of someone born and bred in the craft, lucky you, I envy you.

For me it is a natural state of being, not taught, but inherent in who I am, I just know.

Would I want a teacher? Someone born into a family of tradition? Of course I would, but that is not in my grasp, I am lucky to have a few friends online that are willing to share and guide me with things I don't yet understand and I am grateful for that!

I also believe that yes, it had to start somewhere, that someone had a gift of "knowing" just as I feel that I have, not to that extent of course, but it is there within me.

Am I as powerful and knowledgeable as a witch raised and taught the craft by their Elders?/ Of course not!! Only a fool would claim such a thing.

Do I have the potential to become as powerful?? Only time will tell.

Ritualistic behaviour, though well-intentioned, possesses no significance or effectiveness unless its external prescription is matched by a personal, internal motivation of will and desire.

#40 Stacey

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 06:40 AM

Intuition plays a part in it, as does feeling. Over the years that I've explored different paths and read countless books I've always gone with what felt right, that part of me that said "this could lead somewhere, go there." It's not always panned out completely but I've always learned something new.

But I've learned that intuition is all well and good but there is also work, practice, mistakes, trials and wonderous things walking this path.

Intuition is a beautiful thing but it also takes time to know whether or not it can be trusted, sometimes you think intuition is telling you to do something and it ends up a great big cock up. I think intuition to be used properly should be combined with instinct and common sense.

"The mind is not a book, to be opened at will and examined at leisure. Thoughts are not etched on the inside of skulls, to be perused by an invader. The mind is a complex and many-layered thing." Severus Snape - HP and the Order of the Phoenix