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Fiction written by a Witch


ElizabethNicks

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I'm curious if any of you have read fictional works that are likely or most definitely written by a witch. I would love to sink my teeth into some good fiction now that fall is upon us. I find, in general, it difficult to engage myself in many novels. But, particularly, i have a hard time with books written about witches by a clearly non-witch author.

 

Do you have any suggestions for fiction ... books written by individuals you suspect are definitely in the "know" about witchcraft and its ilk?

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I have only read one, it was written by a Wiccan Priestess, Shaman and Physic named Cerridwen Fallingstar whistling.gif

 

Here is a link with reviews.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Heart-Fire-Cerridwen-Fallingstar/dp/0962147001/ref=cm_cmu_pg_t

 

A few of my own thoughts.

 

I bought this book back in 07, but I do remember it! So that to me is a good sign :)

 

She is a very good writer in that it's an easy read but the details in her writing really take you "there".

 

That being said, if Lesbian sexual content makes you feel uncomfortable you may not enjoy the "love story" part of the book.

 

All in all though, I loved the book and now that I have found it, I'm going to read it again!!!eheheh.gif

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Thanks for the link! I'll check out the title ... "That being said, if Lesbian sexual content makes you feel uncomfortable you may not enjoy the "love story" part of the book. " I think lesbian sexual content may make me a lot of things, but, not uncomfortable. Lol. Thanks for the tip, though! :)

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Thanks for the link! I'll check out the title ... "That being said, if Lesbian sexual content makes you feel uncomfortable you may not enjoy the "love story" part of the book. " I think lesbian sexual content may make me a lot of things, but, not uncomfortable. Lol. Thanks for the tip, though! :)

 

roflhard.gifroflhard.gif

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roflhard.gifroflhard.gif

 

 

ooh, good thing I made you laugh. :flyaway: as an afterthought, I was thinking of editing my post ... glad I cracked up you up. :)

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ooh, good thing I made you laugh. :flyaway: as an afterthought, I was thinking of editing my post ... glad I cracked up you up. :)

 

HELL, I thought it was Brilliant!!!

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I'm curious if any of you have read fictional works that are likely or most definitely written by a witch. I would love to sink my teeth into some good fiction now that fall is upon us. I find, in general, it difficult to engage myself in many novels. But, particularly, i have a hard time with books written about witches by a clearly non-witch author.

 

Do you have any suggestions for fiction ... books written by individuals you suspect are definitely in the "know" about witchcraft and its ilk?

 

I've asked this question before, done a few meager internet searches and given up, but would also love to read something by someone who has real belief there. I don't think Bates would count in that it may be just academic interest as opposed to personal belief. I think something from inside the mind of an actual witch could be awesome depending on the witch/writer. I've been writing my own book for the past 4 years (I write/stop in spurts but always sort of continue where I left off on the same story), and two of the main characters are meant to be conjurer/witch figures. I haven't decided how I would go about putting it out there as obvious or letting the reader put the pieces together themselves, but my guess is that there has to be something out there, possibly written by someone who does not want publicize their beliefs.

 

In the vein of witch fiction, I've not read that much. Rice's Mayfair Witches, some Pratchett stuff, Bates, Updike. I suppose the most interesting reading that borders on your search would be stuff by Robert Anton Wilson. I like how he questions his questions, and there's some level of magic (or maybe just drugs) in his work (lol). People with reading comprehension problems (lolol...yet another laughable pet peeve of mine) accused him of being a witch, but I don't think that counts. He does get a taaaad new age-y though, but in general just fun weird stuff like The Illuminatus Trilogy, Shroedinger's Cat Tril, Ishtar Rising, etc. He's clearly a prodigy of his own thinking. Plus I'm a sucker for quantum physics at times. He also sort of jestingly admitted to being a witch to an interviewer once, but knowing Wilson, he also might've been just messing with the guy's head. This is the closest thing to fiction written by a 'witch' I've found, and even if you're not convinced he falls into that area, I still recommend giving his stuff a spin.

:coffee:

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In general I think there are probably a few witch authors who don't necessarily advertise it.

 

When working as an editor there were sometimes novellas or worse full blown novels in which a writer glamourised their own occupations thinking it a rivetting read when it was evident ego stroking that destroyed all plausibility and ended up not telling a tale.

 

The addage "Write About What You Know" often extends better from drawing from experience and thorough research than drawing from research and thorough experience.

 

So I guess it's a question of asking - are you looking for accurate portrayals of witchcraft in fiction, or are you looking for a witch author regardless of subject matter?

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One that I recommend is Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series with his first book being WIzard's First Rule. This series is awesome. Goodkind is not a "witch" from his own admission to my knowledge, but his books are full a different bits of magic that betrays an understanding of such things. The magic in the books range from cloud reading, herbalism, bone magic, augury, shamanistic trance to speak with ancestor spirits, ceremonial magic, shapeshifting, magic drawing and a form of satanic worship. There is alot of exlposions and fire where the magic is concerned but later in the series it explains why every one sees wizard's fire and lightning and why we don't now. The way certain magic is protrayed in this book along with the ethics of such is very close to my own beliefs and views. I could give a book review but it would take way too long. Just google the titile and see what you get. A word of caution though, the books are very thick and some are very violent especially the first one.

 

There is a tv series based on these books called the Legend of the Seeker. This tv series has a different plot so to me it is of no value except to get an understanding of how some of the main characters look.

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There is a little trilogy by Monica Furlong - Wise Child, Juniper, and Coleman. It follows the lives of a little girl who goes to live with a "witch" and her cousin. It takes place in the 16 or 17 hundreds, and is geared towards young adults so no extreme violence, yet is a worthy read for adults. I found the references to the craft very realistic, from curses to black eggs to glamours to flying ointment to herbal medicine to cunning craft. I very much enjoyed these books and have read them more than once. When non-witch teenagers ask me what the craft is really about (when my son used to live with me I got that a lot, lol) I used to tell them to read those books (of course non ever did, lol). Paperback used they are a pittance on Amazon.

 

M

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Hey thanks everyone - these are great suggestions. And yes, I was looking for fiction accurately portraying witches and their craft. Thanks again for the title ideas.

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There is a little trilogy by Monica Furlong - Wise Child, Juniper, and Coleman. It follows the lives of a little girl who goes to live with a "witch" and her cousin. It takes place in the 16 or 17 hundreds, and is geared towards young adults so no extreme violence, yet is a worthy read for adults. I found the references to the craft very realistic, from curses to black eggs to glamours to flying ointment to herbal medicine to cunning craft. I very much enjoyed these books and have read them more than once. When non-witch teenagers ask me what the craft is really about (when my son used to live with me I got that a lot, lol) I used to tell them to read those books (of course non ever did, lol). Paperback used they are a pittance on Amazon.

 

M

 

Per your review I have ordered the first of this trilogy, Wise Child. It cost me a whopping 1 cent, shipping 3.99 LOLLOL

 

Thanks, I look forward to reading this series!!

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I read a fun horror paranormal thriller by a witch. She has a few series. The one I read is called night shift by Lilith saintcrow. Definitely a seat gripper. Full of the usual demons, were creatures and mediums. Quite gory and exciting. Not persay about a witch, more of a demon hunter, but magic plays it's role and saintcrow knows her stuff. Plus she is from my town, I hope I get a chance to meet her sometime.

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  • 2 weeks later...

There is a little trilogy by Monica Furlong - Wise Child, Juniper, and Coleman. It follows the lives of a little girl who goes to live with a "witch" and her cousin. It takes place in the 16 or 17 hundreds, and is geared towards young adults so no extreme violence, yet is a worthy read for adults. I found the references to the craft very realistic, from curses to black eggs to glamours to flying ointment to herbal medicine to cunning craft. I very much enjoyed these books and have read them more than once. When non-witch teenagers ask me what the craft is really about (when my son used to live with me I got that a lot, lol) I used to tell them to read those books (of course non ever did, lol). Paperback used they are a pittance on Amazon.

 

M

 

Just finished Wise Child, it was very nice, but I'm wondering, I think I should have read Juniper first no??? Oh well............

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I have only read one, it was written by a Wiccan Priestess, Shaman and Physic named Cerridwen Fallingstar whistling.gif

 

Here is a link with reviews.

 

http://www.amazon.co...ref=cm_cmu_pg_t

 

A few of my own thoughts.

 

I bought this book back in 07, but I do remember it! So that to me is a good sign :)

 

She is a very good writer in that it's an easy read but the details in her writing really take you "there".

 

That being said, if Lesbian sexual content makes you feel uncomfortable you may not enjoy the "love story" part of the book.

 

All in all though, I loved the book and now that I have found it, I'm going to read it again!!!eheheh.gif

 

Ahhhhhhh, wish I hadn't done that, I forgot how horrifying the end was cry2.gif

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Just finished Wise Child, it was very nice, but I'm wondering, I think I should have read Juniper first no??? Oh well............

 

Acutally Juniper is the second book in the seeries, but it does go back to Juniper's childhood. And by the end of Coleman (the thrid book) you know who wins, who loses, and how everything turns out which is always nice to know (I hate books that leave you hanging, lol). Although Wisechild is written for young adults, I thought it was a very good depiction of the craft in general even though it is fiction. I really liked the use of the flying ointment. No one will ever really know how it was done "back in the day" and to be honest I'm sure it constantly changed as culture and physical necessity dictated.

 

M

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I loved it, read it one day, it was lovely, oddly at the end of the book it named the next book as the proceding book?? I haven't read that one yet so I guess it will make sence then :) anyway thanks for bringing it to my attention it's actually an easy yet thought provoking tale that I am enjoying very much for my lite reading!! :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

If this is a repeat, I apologize, but it didn't post the first time I wrote it (Damn!) . . .

 

Here goes AGAIN . . . If Witches can write fiction books about Witches, and non-Witches can write fiction books about Witches, as mentioned in this thread, it stands to reason that some of the authors out there writing non-fiction books about Witches are not necessarily Witches. I mean anyone can do some research and write about Witches. When determining the worthiness of a non-fiction book about Witches, we seem to allow for a little poetic license, which seems fair. My question is do we or even should we give the same benefit of the doubt to non-fiction Craft authors, especially those claiming to be Witches? Of course, if an author presents information in a new way or makes a new connection, that certainly has merit, but what criteria is used to judge worthiness for fiction and non-fiction authors? How is it similar? How is it different?

 

Jevne

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I think entertainment is valued abut higher in the priorities for fiction than in nonfiction generally. And in nonfiction credibility is valued a lot higher than it is in fiction.

 

A dry nonfiction book might lose half a point for me, while bad credibility will kill of most the points. In my opinion for fiction it is reversed. I have enjoyed the occasional fluffy witch novel because the plot was fun or riveting.

 

In fiction, it's a bonus if I learn something new, but not required.

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I do believe in "inspired writing" including non-fiction. I often think hte imaginal has a very strong connection to the otherworld, depending on the person. That doesn't mean the fiction is really non-fiction, but I do think some books present some symbology that is inspired, and I happen to believe the Lord of the Rings is one (or three, actually, lol). But I'm also a romantic :-) Non fiction I tend to take more seriously if the author is a scholor, although in reality a non-scholar could just as well know what he is talking about. Fiction I read if it is entertaining me and holding my attention. Non-fiction I read, take bits or not depending on whether they make me think. Even if it doesn't "feel right" to me, if it's made me think, then I'll look into it more.

 

M

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Even if it doesn't "feel right" to me, if it's made me think, then I'll look into it more.

M

 

I find this particular aspect of your post, the most intriguing, because if something doesn't feel right to me, I'll tend to put it aside. For me, it's about cost-benefit analysis. Do I want to spend time looking into and thinking about a book, that MIGHT have some kernel of knowledge in it, or do I want to move on to something else, that has a better feel to it? I know, it's a risk, but right or wrong, I only have a limited amount of processing space right now, so I have to be somewhat picky. I generally find that if I trust my instincts, I make "right" decisions for me with regards to books and other source materials.

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I find this particular aspect of your post, the most intriguing, because if something doesn't feel right to me, I'll tend to put it aside. For me, it's about cost-benefit analysis. Do I want to spend time looking into and thinking about a book, that MIGHT have some kernel of knowledge in it, or do I want to move on to something else, that has a better feel to it? I know, it's a risk, but right or wrong, I only have a limited amount of processing space right now, so I have to be somewhat picky. I generally find that if I trust my instincts, I make "right" decisions for me with regards to books and other source materials.

 

It's probably just the difference in our personalities or make-up, lol. For me I usually find that some things make me feel very uncomfortable or angry, and that is sometimes my logical mind (or delicate sensabilities, lol) fighting with something that deep down strikes a cord, yet makes me uncomfortable. So it doesn't feel "right" but it is making me question things, making me think. That I will usually look into further. Not all craft-related things sit well with my personality, and those things often make me uncomfortable when I first look into them. The choice is always mine as to whether or not I adopt the concept or ever use it, but if something doesn't sit right with me, doesn't feel right, yet is making my mind go back to it over an over, then that's usually a flag to find out if there's a kernal of truth or possibility in the concept.

 

M

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My intuition has a few kinds of uncomfortable. One is an absolutely not safe or okay for me trigger and then there are sorts of other shades of discomfort, curious but weirded out, frightened, but thrilled and so on. Curious but weird may just mean I am learning something that may or may not be for me, but learning will deepen my understanding of my craft. Scared but thrilled might mean it is time for me to take a new leap and conquer some fears to gain power and strength. I have a very tauran personality and I can get stuck in a rut just to be safe if I don't get out a little, but I still err on the side of safety most the time, but my little thrill voice gets a listen now and then.

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