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Share your home made soap recipes


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I was intrigued by a post that CG wrote about the different plants corresponding to each signs of the zodiac... Plants of the Zodiac... I asked her if we could combined the plants of our sign with the plants of our ascendant sign, to make a spell more potent... She came up with the idea that I could probably combine the plants of my sign and ascendant sign when making soaps, as it would prove to be more personal (and probably more potent, I assume)...

 

 

With that, we went in search of soap recipes on the forum coz she had seen a thread about it before. As it turns out, the thread was deleted a while ago and so, here is another thread about it (I was unable to find a thread dedicated to soap making/recipes)...

 

 

 

Mods I'm sorry if I'm not posting in the right section... just thought "home made" was appropriate here ;)

 

 

So here, I invite you to share those soap recipes along with the steps for making them - as well as tricks you've found along the way that make soaps better - i.e.: if you've tweaked a recipe by changing certain steps, ingredients or tools, you could mention it, too - .

 

 

I'm pretty sure there's many ways to make soaps and since I'm a newb at it, I'd greatly appreciate your insight on this...

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks in advance :)

 

 

 

 

Aika

 

 

Edited to correct an honest mistake, Sorry about that CG...

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Pretty sure 'him' is incorrect ;)

 

oops! Thank you for the info!!! :) I hate doing mistakes like that! My goodness!, Gonna edit that right away!!! :)

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I'm just bumping this thread too since I' d love to try my hand at soapmaking. If anyone has some recipes or good how-to books or blogs to share, we're here! :)

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Aww... I wonder what happened to the original soap making thread? There was some good info in there.

 

My absolute favorite soap making ingredients are:

 

Goats milk

Oatmeal

Coconut oil

Honey

 

I've found lots of cooking items make great molds!

 

If you're going for a soap 'log' that you cut after it's set, you can use a loaf pan. And little silicone muffin trays make excellent individual soaps, plus they're so easy to pop out.

And tea cake pans or candy molds can have beautiful little designs... they're fantastic for soap making!

 

 

And remember... no matter how good your soap may look or smell... don't eat it!

 

~ Freki

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Hello Elizabeth :)

 

Well, this is something I was planning on trying out soon too....

 

I am going to use the chapter in my Incense, Oils, and Brews book by Cunningham. I realize he was a Wiccan, but the chapter he has on simple techniques for making ritual soaps, fits perfectly for what I want to do...because his technique does not involve "making soap" and/or having to handle lye...just using coconut oil based Castile soap as a base. If I want to use a soap as part of a spell, I don't want to spend a lot of time making it...his technique can have you whipping up a few bars of soaps to be ready for use in about 3 days.

 

The chapter includes some recipes for using different herb combos. for different intentions too- just to get you started. From there, you can just experiment with your own recipes :)

 

Hopefully, someone else comes along with actual experience making soaps...or maybe even another book recommendation on the subject. Hope that helps.

 

Best Regards,

 

~Ruby

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Aww... I wonder what happened to the original soap making thread? There was some good info in there.

 

My absolute favorite soap making ingredients are:

 

Goats milk

Oatmeal

Coconut oil

Honey

 

I've found lots of cooking items make great molds!

 

If you're going for a soap 'log' that you cut after it's set, you can use a loaf pan. And little silicone muffin trays make excellent individual soaps, plus they're so easy to pop out.

And tea cake pans or candy molds can have beautiful little designs... they're fantastic for soap making!

 

 

And remember... no matter how good your soap may look or smell... don't eat it!

 

~ Freki

 

Hi Freki,

 

We must have been posting at the same time! LOL!

 

This is great info.! I am going to write all of this down...you gave me a great idea too...I have some little molds around here that I had been experimenting with for candle making...bet they'd make great soap molds!

 

Thanks for the inspiration & have a good one!

 

~Ruby

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Here are some of my soaps I made with the melt and pour method, I used the candy tray that I got from Himself in a box of chocolates for Valentines day last year. I infused the soap with essential oils of my liking, and herbs of my liking. I also took my soaps and boxed them up in a similar tray, with real chocolate as a gift for someone. It was inexpensive and my intention is served everytime my friend uses the soap.:cool: I also bought tin molds shaped like shamrocks and gave them away as gifts. I found this tip invaluable about the melt and pour method, put the poured soap in the mold and set it in the freezer, they pop out of molds so much easier and set up quite nicely.:happy:

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

post-477-0-70176500-1314885024_thumb.jpg

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Here are some of my soaps I made with the melt and pour method, I used the candy tray that I got from Himself in a box of chocolates for Valentines day last year. I infused the soap with essential oils of my liking, and herbs of my liking. I also took my soaps and boxed them up in a similar tray, with real chocolate as a gift for someone. It was inexpensive and my intention is served everytime my friend uses the soap.:cool: I also bought tin molds shaped like shamrocks and gave them away as gifts. I found this tip invaluable about the melt and pour method, put the poured soap in the mold and set it in the freezer, they pop out of molds so much easier and set up quite nicely.:happy:

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

 

Awesome tips, Gypsy..I'll be sure to use the freezer tip! I love the creativity you put into them...plus, they look really nice too~ thanks for sharing the pic!

 

 

~Ruby

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Thanks for the information! I should add - in the private, full members section -there is a soapmaking section!

 

 

Cool! Have fun in there, Elizabeth, and thanks for the heads up :)

 

~Ruby

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I want to make some soap, but I'm a complete newbie. Is there anything on the internet to help me out? I just want to make a small batch of the easiest possible soap to make as a first try. :)

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I want to make some soap, but I'm a complete newbie. Is there anything on the internet to help me out? I just want to make a small batch of the easiest possible soap to make as a first try. :)

 

 

The easiest way I have found to make soap is just to get a block of glycerine, goats milk, soy or shea butter base from a craft store and melt it down and pour it in a mold. The glycerine will be clear and give you a really clean feeling, but with herbs in it your soap it will be an earthy brown color and the herbs wont really suspend and mix throughly, so you will have a rough side to the soap. The the other bases are creamier and some sud more than others but your soaps will be a whitish color with a slight tint of what ever herb you put in but the herb will suspend in the soap better and give you a nice speckled effect. So depending on what you want you choose which base. The bases are about $10.00 at Michaels for a large rectangular block and yield about six decent sized bars. Personally I love the shea butter base because its creamy, feels nice and suds well. So, when you pick out your base you get a pan that you will only use for soap and melt it down. (You can find old pans at yard sales, junk shops, pretty much anywhere that sells used things.) You want to have all your herbs prepared and ready to go because you have to watch the soap so it does not burn. It helps to put some vodka in the mix with the herbs to really pull out the herb properties...this will burn off as it cooks. Also put a tiny amount of water in as well. This will help get rid of the bubbles so your soap will set smooth and not have air trapped in. Don't put too much...just a small splash. Constantly stir it like making pudding. When it is about the same consitancy as pudding then you add all your stuff and stir for a while. Cook it for a few minutes...constanly stiring and the then immediately pour in to a mold. Make sure you have enough molds ready in case you make a batch that is too big for your molds. (it sucks having to seach for a place to pour extra hot soap with the pan in your hand...lol.) After that you let it set some where level. Freezer works but make sure it wont tip.

 

 

For herb combinations, make sure to handle any herbs your putting in the soap before hand just in case you have a skin allergy to oils in the herb. You don't want to wash your private bits with something that you are allergic to! :wink: Also, if your giving it away as a gift, write down on a index card what is in the soap and give with it just in case the recipient and family is allergic to anything or has a kid that tries to eat it.

 

I use pretty much anything that has a good scent such as chamomile and lavender and I put in fresh aloe (and sometimes sea kelp to exfoliate). I usally pick one or too Essential oils to add to the mix as well to give it a really nice smell. It's really fun just to work with it and try to make up your own recipes.

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I'm so glad you weighed in on this WhiteRose, I'm just remembering how much fun we had yakking about soaps and the different kind of molds. Wasn't it you that had the idea of using the bottom of a plastic liter bottle, for the "nub" effect ? GADS, how we laughed our socks off about that ! I have to agree with you about the melt and pour method, as when trying to attempt to get lye, the young boy looked at me like I had 3 heads, it was unknown to me at that time, that lye is used in making methamphetamine drugs up here.:pinch: I went with the melt and pour method as it was my first time, and thouroughly enjoy it.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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I'm so glad you weighed in on this WhiteRose, I'm just remembering how much fun we had yakking about soaps and the different kind of molds. Wasn't it you that had the idea of using the bottom of a plastic liter bottle, for the "nub" effect ? GADS, how we laughed our socks off about that ! I have to agree with you about the melt and pour method, as when trying to attempt to get lye, the young boy looked at me like I had 3 heads, it was unknown to me at that time, that lye is used in making methamphetamine drugs up here.:pinch: I went with the melt and pour method as it was my first time, and thouroughly enjoy it.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Haha yes I remember that. Bad idea. Soda bottles....melt, lol. But there are molds you can get with massaging nubs on them. Last time I found a few online you could order. I haven't made any soap in a little while so I might go to Michaels this weekend see if they carry them.

 

I didn't know Lye was use to make meth....yikes lol. I definatly think melt an pour is a safe an easy method to start with. With lye soap isn't there toxic gases that are released?

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With lye soap isn't there toxic gases that are released?

 

Yes! When you make 'real' homemade soap, you add powdered lye to cold water and then add that mixture to your fat. The lye releases awful fumes that if inhaled, can burn your nostrils and even further in. Even working outdoors, my eyes burned & watered something fierce when I tried to make tallow soap. (I got soap but it wasn't pretty. It was also smelly and messy. I abandoned that particular craft.)

 

BTW, if someone is feeling really froggy, you can still buy lye over the Internet. (I haven't seen it in the grocery stores for several years due to the meth issue.) As long as you buy it in small quantities, no one will investigate you.

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Yes! When you make 'real' homemade soap, you add powdered lye to cold water and then add that mixture to your fat. The lye releases awful fumes that if inhaled, can burn your nostrils and even further in. Even working outdoors, my eyes burned & watered something fierce when I tried to make tallow soap. (I got soap but it wasn't pretty. It was also smelly and messy. I abandoned that particular craft.)

 

BTW, if someone is feeling really froggy, you can still buy lye over the Internet. (I haven't seen it in the grocery stores for several years due to the meth issue.) As long as you buy it in small quantities, no one will investigate you.

 

Doesn't sound like my cup of tea, lol. I will stick with melt and pour.

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BTW again, I wrote a blog post here about making soap (melt-and-pour) magical.

 

 

I like the idea of microwaving the soap in a dish and that doubling as the mold. Cool idea! Your are right though the the smell of the EOs are stronger while the soap is hot. Though some EOs have a stronger scent than others it may be a good idea to adjust the number of drops depending on the strength of the scent. I really enjoyed that blog, thanks MW!

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Some craft shops carry lye, generally the serious craft shops that hobbyists use rather than places like hobbycraft which focus more on gifts and getting started - though you might get lucky. Trade shops will carry lye as it's used by plumbers and similar.

 

Lye is like most things, you need to treat it with adequate respect and caution, it will require ventilation and you shouldn't stand over the solution. The solution heats up to around two hundred degrees in roughly six seconds so gloves and coverage are essential if the chemical burns weren't enough caution ;)

 

If you're uncomfortable handling chemicals then probably best to stick with melt and pour. Though it's only a real mess if you don't take care with it.

 

There's an online shop I plan to use, if you search for chandling or soap supplies in the uk you should get decent results.

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I use melt and pour, usually with goat's milk base. I don't make soap often - only for what I need which is usually only once or twice a year. I believe lye is made from pouring water over wood ash (don't quote me though) but I do konw it has ash in it. I would think this may be of great worth when using hearth ash (depending on wood burned and working done in heearth) but I just don't live in the day when people had the time, knowledge, or patience to make things from that sort of scratch. Time is a great need in the modern day (amazingly enough since we have so many appliances that "save" us time) and so I will probably stick to melt and pour and buying candles, lol.

 

M

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