Jump to content

Lux Haeresis by Daniel Schulke


Michele

Recommended Posts

From Lux Haeresis:

 

"Religion and its ritual are, for those who have no direct experience of the mystical, the means of repeating and re-encoding the experience of the Founder. In short, religions are founded on the abdication of the right to See for oneself [sic]."

 

This was quoted in the book from Alogos Dhul' Qarnen Khidir.

 

I found this a very interesting remark. There is a seed of truth in most religions - a gnostic moment by the founder - but once the dogma settles into it and it is defined to the point of being refined and restricted to only its meaning, the gnostic moment thereby looses much of its original illumination. I am very much of the belief that one can not learn from another's gnostic revelation/s; however, one can compare revelations for the seed of truth carried within all gnostic moments and thereby separate the real from the made-up.

 

Is anyone else reading this book and how do you find it? It does have a lot of dual-faith in it, and to those not used to that it can be disarming, but much of old craft DID have dual faith conponents. In fact, many witches had no opposition to the historical Jesus, only to the dogmatic and tyrinical teachings of the church. (See gnostic xtianity.)

 

I also find it interesting how some of the book is essay-type discussion interspersed with a fictional-type character going through his own revelations (rather reminds me of Way of Wyrd to an extent). It would be interesting to separate the chapters and make a story out of both and see what one ends up with.

 

Anyone else reading the book?

 

M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started it, but like his V.U., I have a hard time with the overly-flowery language and constant references to ritual. I do intend to finish them both, eventually, but they can be a bit "draining". For some of the reasons you described, Michele, I still struggle to fit anything that hints of dogma or strict ritual into my craft. When I find the patience, I'll finish them both and try to find the nuggets that do resonate with me. In the meantime, they sit and "glare" at me, lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From Lux Haeresis:

 

"Religion and its ritual are, for those who have no direct experience of the mystical, the means of repeating and re-encoding the experience of the Founder. In short, religions are founded on the abdication of the right to See for oneself [sic]."

 

This was quoted in the book from Alogos Dhul' Qarnen Khidir.

 

I found this a very interesting remark. There is a seed of truth in most religions - a gnostic moment by the founder - but once the dogma settles into it and it is defined to the point of being refined and restricted to only its meaning, the gnostic moment thereby looses much of its original illumination. I am very much of the belief that one can not learn from another's gnostic revelation/s; however, one can compare revelations for the seed of truth carried within all gnostic moments and thereby separate the real from the made-up.

 

Is anyone else reading this book and how do you find it? It does have a lot of dual-faith in it, and to those not used to that it can be disarming, but much of old craft DID have dual faith conponents. In fact, many witches had no opposition to the historical Jesus, only to the dogmatic and tyrinical teachings of the church. (See gnostic xtianity.)

 

I also find it interesting how some of the book is essay-type discussion interspersed with a fictional-type character going through his own revelations (rather reminds me of Way of Wyrd to an extent). It would be interesting to separate the chapters and make a story out of both and see what one ends up with.

 

Anyone else reading the book?

 

**************************************************

M-

This is probably the most simply meaningful delivery of religion in respect to our collective walk. I have voted it up.

The quote also resonates greatly and in a nutshell carries so much weight for me as it should for others.

Thank you

 

FFFF

Elf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Michele,

 

 

"I found this a very interesting remark. There is a seed of truth in most religions - a gnostic moment by the founder - but once the dogma settles into it and it is defined to the point of being refined and restricted to only its meaning, the gnostic moment thereby looses much of its original illumination. I am very much of the belief that one can not learn from another's gnostic revelation/s; however, one can compare revelations for the seed of truth carried within all gnostic moments and thereby separate the real from the made-up. "

 

This is to be a very interesting observation. I would add that it's the responsibility of the aspirant to seek the mysteries out for him or her own self within the context of their beliefs and in turn gain their own revelations versus quoting from a religious text or what they heard at mass. However, speaking from personal experience, one can only absorb so much from texts before they go mad and realize they have to immerse themselves in practice in order to truly relate to whatever revelatory experiences someone else has spoken or written about.

 

 

I've been in the process of reading this book. It seems to be a combination of a story,lore, and praxis. The flowerly language in Lux Haeresis seems to be typical of all Xoanon books, which makes one want to have a dictionary by their side when reading it.:D The story itself can be a veil for lore,teachings, and/or practice. Some of the information is implied as opposed to be directly spelled out according to what I've read on other traditional crafter sites in order to avoid stepping on toes. However, I do agree with you that it would make an interesting story by itself. I'm particularly intrigued by the scene where the aspirant finds himself in a temple where he shown several vividly graphic scenes and subsequently has to choose one out of all of them.

 

As far as the praxis part of the book is concerned, I'm still working with the Fair and Foul exercise in the beginning of the book. I'm still piecing it all together.:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I worked my way through the book and found it interesting and supplemental to my own path. On the other matter raised, I have a different view of "dogma" and such. I think it's like the "factory settings" on a computer hard drive. The foundation is there to make it all work, but we can go from there. I respectfully disagree with the idea that we cannot learn from another's gnostic revelations. Many religions are constructed upon the founder's experience, and seem to thrive quite nicely, for example Buddha and Jesus. The adherents do have their own very profound experiences through following the teachings of the founder.

 

From a mystical perspective, to me it's the Hero mythos in which one comes into alignment with the enlightenment of the hero by embracing the hero's journey. I feel that Joseph Campbell said it well when he remarked:

 

"We have not even to risk the adventure alone. For the heroes of all time have gone before us. The labyrinth is thoroughly known. We have only to follow the thread of the hero path. And where we had thought to find an abomination we shall find a god. And where we had thought to slay another we shall slay ourselves. Where we had thought to travel outward we shall come to the center of our own existence. Where we had thought to be alone we shall be with all the world." - Joesph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I started reading the book and stopped. I got caught up in the fair is foul, foul is fair exercise as well. I was actually suprised that the exercise evoked the response from me that it did.

 

I haven't finished reading it yet, so I can't really comment on it more. However, I do agree that we can learn from others' experiences, but when we try to turn things into the 'right' way, we get robbed. I remember when I first began working with witchcraft. I knew very little about it, but I followed my intuition which worked great. Then I found books at the bookstore and began trying to do things that way, which I thought was the 'right' way. That has caused me all sorts of problems through the years and although I have learned a lot from it, I almost wish at times that I would have just left all those books alone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just came to the fair is foul exercise and I am preparing to practice it. My visualization skills aren't super strong. I see best when a self hypnotized state, but then I might forget what I meant to meditate on. I am going to make a guided meditation out of it by taping myself reading the meditation and see if that does er.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Is anyone else reading this book and how do you find it? It does have a lot of dual-faith in it, and to those not used to that it can be disarming, but much of old craft DID have dual faith conponents. In fact, many witches had no opposition to the historical Jesus, only to the dogmatic and tyrinical teachings of the church. (See gnostic xtianity.)

 

Anyone else reading the book?

 

M

 

See this is me. Many witches scoff at me and look down at me because I think Jesus was a hella cool dude. Very liberal for his time and if you read the Gnostic Gospels you will see he believed in many new agey type ideas (God is within us all etc) And also, I tend to see his miracles as the craft. My homeboy Jesus was a witch and I admire him. I'm not a christian by any stretch of the imagination, but I do sometimes talk to Jesus and I do not think this makes me any less of a witch. :)

 

Sounds like a good book! I shall put it on my list. :) Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...