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Anthology of American folk music


spinney

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthology_of_American_Folk_Music

 

This is something I am reading about. I love old bluegrass, and living on the border of Kentucky and Tennessee for a while just thrilled me. This anthology is full of Appalachian folklore. I would love to hear some of it. The songs put together by Harry Smith, that grumpy old 'Beatnik Shaman' have inspired many mystic Folk music legends .

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I once had a very god friend who lived in rural south Illinois. She loved Bluegrass music and told me often that moving the Appalachia would be her dream. When i was fortunate enough to be invited into her home she told me of her love of this music and how she was moved by it. A year later i hooked up with her again and she informed me that she has since learned to play banjo a la Tennessee, picked up her instrument and regaled me with an amazing selection of Bluegrass pieces.

She really showed what a passion can produce, wonderful stuff indeed.

She also later moved to Tennessee and I lost contact.

I have not grown to appreciate this form of music but it was rewarding to witness all this.

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Elf

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This is a fabulous collection.

 

A great site for those interested in folk music and ways is Folk Streams

 

On this site there is a short video of a film made in my home place community. Growing up, I was surrounded by some of these people and my Granny's house is in one of the clips..

 

Madison County Project

 

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Truly wonderful and engaging. A view into a sub-culture like this is very rewarding.

I was particularly taken by the "Old Fellah" singing "Down the Road" what a character, and so much passion. Also the story of the end of a friendship over recordings was very moving.

Thank you for this

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Elf

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I used to go to folk nights at my local pub, always a good turn out for some 'fiddly-diddly' music. One evening we had some proper Bluegrass musicians come over from the U.S. to play - t'was an excellent night.

 

My old mate back in Blighty is an organiser for music nights at a Workingmen's Club in the UK He tells me that the most popular is "traditional" US fare, C&W included.

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Elf

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I love bluegrass! My Great Grandma plays the banjo, guitar, harmonica, mandolin, violin, and piano. I grew up listening to her and the rest of the family play, so bluegrass has some powerful associations for me.

 

 

 

Oh me too Aloe, My uncle, cousin and several other pickers from around Madison would gather on the porch on Sat afternoons and play till late at night..I have a picture somewhere of a cousin and I sitting on the porch steps, my uncle and another cousin sitting behind us playing with a few other men.. one being Bill Monroe himself... My uncle had befriended him at a Fiddlers Competition in the late 60's and he would always come over for cookouts and playing when in western NC... Don't recall have a female musician but there are several ballad singers in the family.. One was in the video I linked.

 

 

I have been really excited about the newer younger artists discovering this genera of music. They had adopted the traditional songs and written their own bluegrass fusion.. Some of my current favorites are Carolina Chocolate Drops, Appalachia Rising, Galactic Cowboy Orchestra, Tony Furtado, Old Crow Medicine Show, The Steeldrivers, and Bella Fleck and the Flecktones.

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Oh me too Aloe, My uncle, cousin and several other pickers from around Madison would gather on the porch on Sat afternoons and play till late at night..I have a picture somewhere of a cousin and I sitting on the porch steps, my uncle and another cousin sitting behind us playing with a few other men.. one being Bill Monroe himself... My uncle had befriended him at a Fiddlers Competition in the late 60's and he would always come over for cookouts and playing when in western NC... Don't recall have a female musician but there are several ballad singers in the family.. One was in the video I linked.

 

 

I have been really excited about the newer younger artists discovering this genera of music. They had adopted the traditional songs and written their own bluegrass fusion.. Some of my current favorites are Carolina Chocolate Drops, Appalachia Rising, Galactic Cowboy Orchestra, Tony Furtado, Old Crow Medicine Show and Bella Fleck and the Flecktones.

 

Bill Monroe?! OK I'm impressed. ;) Funny, in my family most of the women play multiple instruments, but very few of the men play at all.

 

I like Old Crow and Bella Fleck, but the others I don't know, I'll have to check out some of their stuff since I know we have similar taste in music.

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Have you heard O Death spinney? Didn't see it mentioned in your link. :) The origins are pretty much unknown, but its been around for a long time. It came to wider attention when Ralph Stanley sang it in Oh Brother Where Art Thou for the scene of the Klan meeting, but he'd been singing it long before then.

 

I don't know if this article is accurate or not, but it goes along with what I've heard before about the history of the song. http://www.kansas.co...ack-to-the.html

 

Personally, every time I hear this song I feel like I'm listening to the words of a death curse. Particularly lines like "I'll fix your feet till you can't walk, I'll lock your jaw till you can't talk, I'll close your eyes till you can't see." and "To draw the flesh off of the frame, the earth and worm both have a claim."

 

Link to the lyrics: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_Death

 

No one sings it like Ralph Stanley IMO.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xmRWj7gJEU

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