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Easy DIY laundry powder and other natural cleaners


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#1 Meghan

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:49 PM

Love this laundry powder and other cleaners. I'm always on the look for natural house keeping products, and these are the ones that i've found most effective.

Laundry powder

1 cup grated bar soap (i've used ivory in a pinch, but fels-napa laundry bar soap works the best. Found it in my grocery stores laundry section.)
1 cup of borax (laundry section)
1 cup of washing soda (mine is made by arm and hammer, also in the laundry section)

Mix all of these ingrediants together and put them in an old detergent jug (or whatever u have). Use two tablespoons per load, 3 if its super huge.



All purpose scrub

Baking soda
5-10 drops of Essential oil

I like to put this in a pasta sauce jar with holes poked in the lid like a shaker. I use this stuff to clean my bathtub, sinks, sticky floors/counters, toilet bowls, super yucky dishes,
and to freshen the carpets and draw negative energy out ( sprinkle on and leave for 15 min, vacuum off).






DIY window cleaner

1/4 cup vinegar
1/2 teaspoon liquid soap
3 tablespoons rubbing alcohol
2 cups water

Put into spray bottle and shake. I like to use old news papers to clean my windows and mirrors.






All purpose spray

2 tablespoons mild dishwashing liquid soap
2 1/2 cups of water
5 drops of tea tree oil

Put into spray bottle and shake.

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#2 CelticGypsy

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:06 PM

Nice tips, thanks ! Jaysus..are you ambitious ! For my windows, I just use a micro-fiber cloth and water ! You put me to shame..............girl. lol !

Regards,
Gypsy

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#3 Meghan

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:54 PM

Nice tips, thanks ! Jaysus..are you ambitious ! For my windows, I just use a micro-fiber cloth and water ! You put me to shame..............girl. lol !

Regards,
Gypsy



I think I like mixing up the "potion" much more than the actual cleaning haha.


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#4 Mountain Witch

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 12:20 AM

Nice tips, thanks ! Jaysus..are you ambitious ! For my windows, I just use a micro-fiber cloth and water ! You put me to shame..............girl. lol !

Regards,
Gypsy


Diluted white vinegar & newspapers for windows, here.

Have plenty of 'green' cleaning stuff around (mostly baking soda-based) but not laundry soap. We're on a septic system & have to use liquid rather than powder to prevent buildup. I'm entirely too lazy to make anything, too!

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#5 Blyss

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 10:48 AM

I love the scrub idea....very cool. Never thought of doing that, but so much better than those harsh, scratchy cans of crap at the store. Anything with essential oils is right up my alley. :) thanks for sharing.. :)
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#6 ejfinch

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 12:00 PM

I have made the liquid form of this laundry soap before, but I ended up throwing most of it out because it didn't do a very good job. The recipe I made had baking soda in it as well as all of the other ingredients listed.
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#7 Meghan

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 02:52 AM

I love the scrub idea....very cool. Never thought of doing that, but so much better than those harsh, scratchy cans of crap at the store. Anything with essential oils is right up my alley. :) thanks for sharing.. :)


It's kinda crazy how many uses baking soda in a homemade shaker mixed with some essential oils has. i seriously use it for 85% of my cleaning (and also some spell work). I've heard people complain about the laundry soap not cleaning clothes as good as store bought, and when i first mixed it up with ivory bar soap I wasn't that impressed. A year later i tried it with the fels- napa laundry soap and it worked for me. Like anything else YMMV Posted Image

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#8 midnightblue

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 10:30 AM

The mix I use for laundry powder is soap flakes, soda crystals and white vinegar. Works incredibly well although I find I need to give my clothes an extra rinse cycle to make sure the soap is all washed out. I just buy bog standard soap and grate it myself (PITA to do, one day I will buy a new food processor and I can whack it through there instead) but I plan in making the soap myself one day .

I find white vinegar is a really good household cleaner actually.

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#9 Whiterose

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:19 AM

I just found this site that gives a whole bunch of helpful tips on how to make household cleaners. http://www.thesoapki...and_recipes.htm
Enjoy!

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#10 Marabet

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:44 AM

I have been using that powdered laundry soap recipe (in the OP) for a few years. It's all we'll use now (and I have 5 very active kids. It works better than some of the other store-bought stuff we have used, even). For windows I could never get the vinegar deal to work for whatever reason so I use a bit of rubbing alcohol in water and a microfiber cloth.

Edited by Marabet, 22 February 2012 - 12:46 AM.

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#11 Nikki

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Posted 27 October 2015 - 08:15 PM

@ DYI Laundry soap...

A neighbor of mine uses the above recipe to make her own laundry soapin liquid form. I tried it in powder form.

I used a bar of Zote soap that I grated with a cheese grater.. along with the Borax and Washing Power. I reused my old plastic laundry pod container for storage.

WORKS great :)

(my pet developed a UTI from a procedure and the poor thing had soiled a white canvas couch, badly. The urine was dark, smelly (OMG) and had trace amounts of blood, too. Also, it was dried by the time I discovered it) I thought the couch would never be the same.

Figuring this would be a great test to see how effective this DIY laundry soap really is, I used it for the first time on these stubborn pet stains.

Well, I was astounded at how well it worked !!! Super clean, no stains or discoloration, no residual stank was left on the white material. Like new.

The soap left a very faint, light fresh scent behind that faded quickly. Wow.

Since very little powder is actually needed to clean a load of laundry, it's also very economical. I use two tablespoons per load. That's all. (and that's probably too much)
I figure this batch will last me 6 months, or more.

Clothes, sheets and towels are soft, too... even when they air dry. FYI, this soap does not suds up (so I imagine it rinses cleaner than commercial products.)
I don't need to add fabric softener with this soap, so even better.

Personal preference: I add scent beads to the laundry powder for an extra boost / longer lasting fragrance.

With some 'leftover' laundry powder, I added it to an empty dish soap bottle, refilled with water, gave it good shake - and that works great too !!! It's nice to squirt some directly on a small stain, carpet, whatever. It's very handy to have around.


As much as I like Gain and Tide... no more. I'll be making my own laundry soap from now on.

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#12 midnightblue

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 03:56 PM

Since my last post I've started using soap nuts usually with a drop or two of essential oils, rosemary and lavender being my favourites. No soap build up and really cheap, plus the soap nuts can then be composted.
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#13 Ravenshaw

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 05:33 PM

Nikki - that's exactly the soap I use on my laundry! We make it in big batches, sometimes ass Fels Naptha and Tea Tree oil to it. It' works really well. We make it super thick (less water) and we can get a whole year out of 6 quart jars.

RSKHFMY


#14 Nikki

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 12:43 AM

Gotta love it !!!
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The difference between Medicine and Poison is the Dose. :oil-bottle:
I Love you as certain Dark Things are to be Loved,
In Secret, Between the Shadow and the Soul.
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#15 Wyrd

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Posted 31 October 2015 - 11:09 PM

I don't use any chemicals on my clothes, and this is the recipe I've been using for years. It's quick and super effective!

Dry Ingredients:
¼ Cup of Washing Soda (softens the water and helps remove stains).
¼ Cup of Borax (neutralizes fluoride and removes stains, kills bacteria and molds).
¼ Cup of Baking Soda (neutralizes odor and removes stains, kills bacteria and molds).
¼ to ½ teaspoon of Citric Acid powder (vitamin C; to neutralize chlorine).

Wet Ingredient:
¼ to ½ Cup of liquid Castle Soap (I like Dr. Bronners peppermint soap)

Just dump everything in the machine (not the soap compartment) with your clothes, and they will come out soft and clean!

:)

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#16 Nikki

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Posted 02 November 2015 - 12:52 PM

Since my last post I've started using soap nuts usually with a drop or two of essential oils, rosemary and lavender being my favourites. No soap build up and really cheap, plus the soap nuts can then be composted.


Soap nuts? Sounds cool, love E.O.'s.... but what are soap nuts and how are they made?

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The difference between Medicine and Poison is the Dose. :oil-bottle:
I Love you as certain Dark Things are to be Loved,
In Secret, Between the Shadow and the Soul.
- Pablo Neruda


#17 SkyeVaruna

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 08:41 AM

Soap nuts? Sounds cool, love E.O.'s.... but what are soap nuts and how are they made?

 

 

I realise this question was asked over a year ago, but maybe this is of some interest to someone.

I stole this from EcoNutsSoap.com "Eco Nuts® Soap Nuts are a berry shell that naturally contains soap. They grow on the Sapindus mukorossi (Soap Berry) tree in the Himalayas. The natural soap found in these berries is called saponin. Saponin is a natural cleaner that works as a surfactant, breaking the surface tension of the water to penetrate the fibers of your clothing, lifting stains from the fabric, and leaving dirt suspended in the water that is rinsed away." We use these too for laundry, in combination with a few essential oil drops for scent, and they work quite well. I read a dissertation only a few days ago of someone who studied to become a herbalist, about saponin in plants, and that they are quite some other plants out there with saponin, which you easily use to make your own soaps etc. One of them is common ivy (hedera helix l.) If you mix 1 liter water with 50 g common ivy leaves in a blender, then boil the mix for a few minutes, and then strain the mix to get out the leftover leaf parts. You can use this base to do the dishes, shampoo, regular soap, etc. (The whole dissertation is here but it's in Dutch, so I don't know how useful this is for anyone here: http://www.mier.be/N...en Bultynck.pdf) I really want to try this soon.


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