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Authentic Throwing of the Bones


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#1 Blacksmith

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 11:49 PM

I found an excellent site, that gives almost all the details as to the authentic "throwing of the bones" divination. This is the method I was taught and practice.

http://www.ezakwantu...he%20CHOKWE.htm

Also, this page gives a lot of details as to the views of West and Central African witchcraft.

Edited by Blacksmith, 22 June 2011 - 12:54 AM.


#2 Startella

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 08:45 PM

I found an excellent site, that gives almost all the details as to the authentic "throwing of the bones" divination. This is the method I was taught and practice.

http://www.ezakwantu...he%20CHOKWE.htm

Also, this page gives a lot of details as to the views of West and Central African witchcraft.



Thanks for sharing this link with all of us.. I am enjoying it!
Startella

“Draco Dormien Nuquam Titillandus”
(Never Tickle A Sleeping Dragon)



#3 Blacksmith

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Posted 03 July 2011 - 07:02 PM

Thanks for sharing this link with all of us.. I am enjoying it!
Startella


Thanks, I am glad you liked it. I often get frustrated when people say they throw the bones and out comes a weeks worth of chicken leg bones. Put those chicken leg bones in the trash where they belong. lol One thing that I notice a lot in witchcraft communities whether hoodoo, or other, is that people don't even bother to research the origin of the practice, let alone make the effort to find a teacher and learn it. This is one of the reasons the doors are closed to many people trying to seek knowledge from someone qualified. I think you can imagine how someone looks to me when they ask to learn from me and they tell me they have experience "throwing the bones". There are many variations on this system of divination, but none of them include parts from last nights KFC bucket. Some systems use cowrie shells, coconut shells, making a grid in the sand and reading fox tracks in the morning (Dogon Tribe), and some still read the entrails of livestock, especially goats. In some small remote African tribe, the goat that will be eaten at a wedding feast has its entrails read. If the omen is bad, the marriage must wait until something is done, sometimes magic, sometimes something more mundane. That's the closest practice to throwing the KFC leftovers.


#4 Wytchywoman

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 04:59 PM

Thank you for the resource Blacksmith! I am admittedly ignorant about throwing bones for divination, so I am enjoying learning more about it!
Smile! It makes people wonder what you're up to..

#5 RavenFlyer

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 10:04 PM

Thanks, I am glad you liked it. I often get frustrated when people say they throw the bones and out comes a weeks worth of chicken leg bones. Put those chicken leg bones in the trash where they belong. lol One thing that I notice a lot in witchcraft communities whether hoodoo, or other, is that people don't even bother to research the origin of the practice, let alone make the effort to find a teacher and learn it. This is one of the reasons the doors are closed to many people trying to seek knowledge from someone qualified. I think you can imagine how someone looks to me when they ask to learn from me and they tell me they have experience "throwing the bones". There are many variations on this system of divination, but none of them include parts from last nights KFC bucket. Some systems use cowrie shells, coconut shells, making a grid in the sand and reading fox tracks in the morning (Dogon Tribe), and some still read the entrails of livestock, especially goats. In some small remote African tribe, the goat that will be eaten at a wedding feast has its entrails read. If the omen is bad, the marriage must wait until something is done, sometimes magic, sometimes something more mundane. That's the closest practice to throwing the KFC leftovers.



I know within your path and tradition this practice is what is referred to as throwing the bones.
However, within Appalachian culture there are people who use bones and throw them out onto a table or cloth and read them. You are correct though these women (mostly) and men use bones that aren't kfc leftovers. They use the bones of snakes, rats, cats, dogs, chickens, etc. It's a blend of different animal bones that they read. It is a tradition I must am slowly working on with a local woman. There aren't many people left that do this practice.

There is a really good song by Dolly Parton called "these old bones" that is about an old psychic woman living up in the mountains of Appalachia. And she throws bones to read for people, however, she only uses the bones as a prop for the customers in the song. In reality there is an art to actually reading the bones and where they fall accordingly.

My ETSY store:

Appalachian Witchery http://www.etsy.com/...lachianWitchery

#6 Blacksmith

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 01:36 AM

I know within your path and tradition this practice is what is referred to as throwing the bones.
However, within Appalachian culture there are people who use bones and throw them out onto a table or cloth and read them. You are correct though these women (mostly) and men use bones that aren't kfc leftovers. They use the bones of snakes, rats, cats, dogs, chickens, etc. It's a blend of different animal bones that they read. It is a tradition I must am slowly working on with a local woman. There aren't many people left that do this practice.

There is a really good song by Dolly Parton called "these old bones" that is about an old psychic woman living up in the mountains of Appalachia. And she throws bones to read for people, however, she only uses the bones as a prop for the customers in the song. In reality there is an art to actually reading the bones and where they fall accordingly.


That's interesting, both sides of my family are Appalachian. One grandmother from West Virginia and my mother's side is from the hills of Kentucky, about 10 miles up in the hills above Butcher Hollow, just outside of Jenkins. My grandfather used to check on Loretta Lynn and her family at the end of each winter. ( I was born and raised in Ohio however) I would be interested in knowing what part of Appalachia this bone throwing divination method is used. I've had some Appalachian folk magic practices handed down to me. I found that the West Virginia and Kentucky sides of the family had very different ways. My tradition is African diaspora and the link is about an African practice, so I did not think to specify, but I am here only talking about the "bone throwing" that I do, the traditional Angolan basket divination, which is a system that many have lost cultural memory of. I have actually seen people on the street offering bone readings, with what looks like Popeye's Chicken leg bones. There are other methods of divination from Africa, but general consensus in my circles is that ngombo is the most likely source of the throwing of the bones introduced into New Orleans and that this system has become very corrupted and altered by many. The main point is that each piece and how they land in the front of the basket has a significance in symbolism, the basket and the diviner are ritually prepared, that we work with our spirits to come to answers, and most importantly the ngombo is the divination to seek who used witchcraft against you. This is a system that involves spiritualism, animism, rituals to increase intuition, and a solid understanding of the inner workings of African spiritualist witchcraft. Thanks for the post.


#7 RavenFlyer

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 03:30 AM

I was born and raised in southwest VA about 30 minutes from KY. Without posting too much personal info on the public board I will say I have a lot of family from whitesburg, Jenkins, and a couple of other places in KY. As well as a lot of ancestors from Cherokee, and the surrounding parts of NC as well as northeast TN.

The practice I'm not sure where it originally originated at. But I have seen it practiced in VA, TN, and NC. My great great grandmother who was the local healer, midwife, herbalist, and psychic practiced bone throwing. She died in 1952 so I never got to meet her of learn from her physically. I do have some writings of hers but that's about it.

From what I have learned so far depending on the bones (I.e. Which animal they come from an what part) has a significance and where it falls does as well. My family isn't a tradition per se. But there is a lot of mixed ideas between Cherokee, Irish, cornish, African and then faith wise a lot of baptist ideas lol. The bones themselves come to you when you are ready for their medicine according to my teacher. Right now most of mine are birds and I am learning to read those and what they mean.

My ETSY store:

Appalachian Witchery http://www.etsy.com/...lachianWitchery

#8 Solice

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 11:21 PM

I was born and raised in southwest VA about 30 minutes from KY. Without posting too much personal info on the public board I will say I have a lot of family from whitesburg, Jenkins, and a couple of other places in KY. As well as a lot of ancestors from Cherokee, and the surrounding parts of NC as well as northeast TN.

The practice I'm not sure where it originally originated at. But I have seen it practiced in VA, TN, and NC. My great great grandmother who was the local healer, midwife, herbalist, and psychic practiced bone throwing. She died in 1952 so I never got to meet her of learn from her physically. I do have some writings of hers but that's about it.

From what I have learned so far depending on the bones (I.e. Which animal they come from an what part) has a significance and where it falls does as well. My family isn't a tradition per se. But there is a lot of mixed ideas between Cherokee, Irish, cornish, African and then faith wise a lot of baptist ideas lol. The bones themselves come to you when you are ready for their medicine according to my teacher. Right now most of mine are birds and I am learning to read those and what they mean.


I find this fascinating, especially when you speak of the type of animal bone and limb having different significance. I would dearly like to hear more of your learnings as you progress. Thank you for sharing your experience and family history.