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Tana

Magickal Uses of Woods

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Ok last one promise lol, these two trees I know well because I still use them today for a wide variety of things. I hope I'm not over loading you guys or causing a problem if I am feel free to edit or move as you see fit.

 

The Tamarac tree is a lovely tree Native Americans used the different parts of the tamarack tree for a variety of applications. The new shoots are nutritious and can be boiled for food. The inner bark can be dried, ground and mixed with other flours. The sap is said to have a sweet flavor.

Tea made from tamarack bark has been used as a laxative, tonic, diuretic, for jaundice, sore throats, headaches, rheumatism and skin ailments such as burns and sores.

The Potawatomi used tamarack tea to treat distemper of horses.

Tamarack roots are used by the Ojibwe to make woven bags and for sewing canoe edges. The Cree, who call tamarack by the name "wachinakin," use parts of the tree for toboggans, snow shoes, canoes and firewood, but their most well-known use is their beautiful and lifelike goose hunting decoys, which are still made from tamarack twigs and are sold as works of art today.

 

Last but certainly not least is my favorite tree it symbolizes something special to me in some areas it's called red ceder but the juniper I use is Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum).

Juniper needles and boughs had additional protective powers over illness, death, and sorcery. Boughs were hung around the house during epidemics to drive germs away and were considered powerful medicine for driving away evil spirits associated with death. Hunters also rubbed themselves with juniper boughs for protection from grizzlies. Needles were burned ceremonially for their sacred, purifying smoke that could ward off illness, protect from witches, and remove fear of thunder.In contrast to pinyon, most medicinal uses of juniper came from infusions or boiled extracts of branches, twigs, needles, or cones rather than from pitch. Nevertheless, these preparations were used for a list of conditions

just as long and varied: kidney trouble, heart trouble, hemorrhages, stomachaches, headaches, menstrual cramps, colds, fevers, smallpox, flu, pneumonia, venereal disease, diabetes, cholera, tuberculosis, chickenpox, worms, swellings, rheumatism, burns, sore throats, hives or sores, and boils or slivers. A strong decoction of the cones was even used to kill ticks on horses.

The bluish, berry-like cones containing one or two seeds were boiled and eaten, or dried and used to make a drink, or ground into meal and added to water for a drink or to make into cake. They were also pierced and strung for beads. The Okanagan-Colville tribe of British Columbia considered the cones to be poisonous and used them

on bullets or arrowheads to kill people more quickly in warfare, yet they also made a drink from the cones and drank it in the sweathouse.

Edited by Athena
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I can't seem to find much of anything on the boards related to ebony wood. I purchased an ebony wand just a few months ago, as I felt drawn to it and decided to experiment a bit. It is aggressively protective, which is in line with what I have been reading about online as far as some of it's associations. Also, in general-just an all around "power booster" or good for any general purpose, type of wand. They don't grow around these parts, and I was wondering, if anyone on the boards has ever been around a live ebony tree and/or worked with ebony or an ebony wand.

Edited by Anara

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Sorry - I do not know ebony, although I love woods.

 

M

In my limited experience with it, I can kinda relate it to more of a blackthorn "type" of energy, but it has it's own unique energy to it at the same time. I have also seen ebony described as "dominating". I'd say that's true-so far anyway.

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Ebony is an African tree- the wood my husband used often in his pieces, it sometimes "explodes " while drying; not the most stable exotic to work with and it is a very small tree- resinous. That's all I know

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I started to say that I am interested in learning more about exotic woods; however, I am more interested in exotic trees, as in living entities. I am hoping to find some examples in local botanical gardens and the like, so I can test some magical theories that I am working on. Exotic implies "not around me", so this may prove a challenge.

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It is interesting how different the attributes associated to woods can be from tradition to tradition. I wonder if, at one time, there ever was a more universal understanding of them?

 

M

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That would be an interesting thing to try and place a time of understanding but I think as we evolved in our spiritual understanding,it must have been a type of horses for courses thing. I know you mean much further back in time but I often think about, well not that often lol,Moses and the burning bush. There is a bush,tho I can't remember where that actually sets a light on its own. Then i go to Isaack Newton and his appletree,which help him with his gravitational theories.So many lores regarding trees, Odin, and the green ash tree,so yes, very interesting M.

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I've mentioned elsewhere about Bog-Oak that I got from Drumshanbo in Ireland. Drumshanb is in the Shadow of the Iron Mountains - so called because Gobniu, Smith of the Tuathe De Danaan (Children of Dana) set up house and shop at the foot of the mountains and built his forge there. To go there is to see a magical place - but then all of Ireland is a magical place - even Dublin (which means Black Waters). Whilst I was there I went beyond the pale of Dublin to The Circle in the North where the Lia-Fal stands, unfortunately, when I was there the council had put a fence around it so ten metres from the stone so you couldn't touch it let alone sit on it!

 

 

the other great place is NewGrange which is a Neolithic Chambered Tomb but it is huge and the rear of the monument is as interesting as the entrance into it, and I believe, they have excursions to it at Winter Solstice Eve, so that you can sit in the rear Chamber in the centre of the monument and watch the Mid-winter Sun rise at dawn and flood the passage to the burial cells with Golden Light. When I went for that, the light was sparkling and I felt as though I had been electrified by the Sun - it was the strangest of feelings. I swear I could see the shadows of the dead rise from their tombs and walk down the passage and into the Sun's Light. If you can visit the place, do. And get your own feelings from the site. There are many places to go and the Celtic, Stone Circles around Cork are absolutely superb!

 

Another reason to go is to visit Huntington Castle, Clonegal, in County Carlow, the seat of the Fellowship of Isis. unfortunately, its founder and High Priestess, Olivia Durdin-Robertson, passed into the World of Spirit on 14th November 2013. The last link to the family  and the Fellowship of Isis lies with Pamela Durdin-Robertson, wife and High priestess of Laurence Durdin-Robertson (Olivia's brother) who passed on  some nineteen years previously. foxman

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I've mentioned elsewhere about Bog-Oak that I got from Drumshanbo in Ireland. . . .

 

Foxman,

 

I realize that your posts are primarily composed on information from your experiences and travels.  I am finding those details quite interesting; thank you for sharing.  For the auxiliary content, however, would you be kind enough, when appropriate, to include some references or suggested resources for those of us, who like to do our own in-depth research on the subjects? 

 

Thank you much.

 

Jevne

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Has anyone utilised lightning struck wood before? I know its used in hoodoo for power and destruction but I've never come across someone who's worked with it? Any thoughts? Or maybe the characteristics of a lightning struck wand?

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Has anyone utilised lightning struck wood before? I know its used in hoodoo for power and destruction but I've never come across someone who's worked with it? Any thoughts? Or maybe the characteristics of a lightning struck wand?

 

I have used lightning struck wood. Best I can describe it, it is like lightning itself. Highly, highly charged (and the charge doesn't fade with time). There are other lightning struck items with similar properties, I believe. For example, I have a piece of fulgurite which is lightning struck/fused sand and it exhibits a similar charge and feel. They are pretty cool. :)

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I have access to a tree that was lightening struck in the spring of this year . It has already fallen over on the ground. I actually heard the strike when it happened , went out a couple of weeks later and found it up in the tree line behind my property , bark all sprayed out , some was even stuck in the ground like spears . I have wondered what I could make or do with some of the wood , before it all rots away. Maybe some suggestions from the folks here......

 

Nabu

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For now, I would just go out and salvage whatever pieces speak to you. You'll figure out what to do with them eventually (probably when you have need of it lol).

 

A spear with the energy of lightening - that's a hell of a thing to have.

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Yep, that's what I would do too-salvage whatever is calling to you & you'll know what to do with it when the time is right.

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I have a piece of lightening-struck dogwood. I haven't used it yet, because I'm having trouble processing it. The energy is palpable. That's about all I really know so far, that it is super strong.

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I bet. There's a whirlwind of chaotic energies tempered by gentleness.

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Oh , I do plan on a salvage operation especially since it has fell over on the ground . Just a matter of doing it , much of the wood has already decayed since the spring . Boxes and wands came to mind when I first found it , now to find folks that do have a use for the energy from the strike . This is something that is not often available to some , and I should make use of it and not waste the opportunity .really should have taken pics of it when I found it , but hindsight sometimes kicks in after the fact. Busy time ahead with this material of fortunate gift.

 

Nabu

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Lol you win and lose some I just added some to my regular mojo so well see how that goes in the coming week but a lightning soearvseems like a great tool for invoking justice or divine judgment

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IVY / VINE 
The Ivy was sacred to Osiris as well as to Dionysus. 
Vine and Ivy come next to each other at the turn of the year, and are jointly dedicated to resurrection. 
Presumably, this is because they are the only two trees that grow spirally. 
The Vine also symbolizes resurrection because its strength is preserved in the wine. 
MAGICKAL ASPECTS: (VINE) Faerie work, Joy, Exhilaration, Wrath, Rebirth. (IVY) Fidelity, Constancy, Love, Intoxication. 

 

I wonder if the type of ivy/vine is significant. For example, grape vine vs. kudzu......kudzu is everywhere around here.....lol

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I've been researching and writing a lot about the folkloric uses of wood on my blog recently, I'm stoked to know others are interested in this too! Anyone else a wood carver? I make spoons, bowls, stangs, and wands with a variety of southeastern hardwoods. 

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I have a fire wand. The house burned down and it was a remnant from that. It is charred, but wand shaped and it's probably redwood.

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Great stuff here,

I think can add a hand full I didn't notice reading through.

 

Holly is also a symbol of life and death to some. I would figure this is related to it being poisonous and medicinal.

 

Musselwood has the expected strength, protection, and permanence. It has been said to be used to control the will of others particularly animals. Most likely because it was used to make good ox yokes, or maybe vise versa. But, I have also been told protection from fire which I would like to learn more about if anyone has heard the same.

I will also add for earlier questions, There are a lot of trees known as Ironwood this is one it is also known as American Hornbeam and the technical folk call it Carpinus caroliniana.

 

Hickory twists have been handy to folk in things relating to secretes. Keeping them and fining them out. I've always heard this and encountered it all up and down the east coast of the U.S. Why make good sense to me but, I wonder if it's origins are native or pioneer, and if it pops up anywhere else.

 

Birch has been used for things relating to spirits. I was told as a kid that a spirit may use the shade of a birch as a doorway to the living world, or to be seen or heard by the living. It have seen where it was used relating to animation and sentience. The closest folk lore I found so far was from around Russia.

 

Lilac I learned growing up held the magic of rebirth. I always thought this must have to do with spring and the cloud of fragrance. One year a hard winter took some branches down off my lilac. They were tossed in the wood pile to dry till after midsummer. Then looking for a pole to prop a net for my strawberry one was cut into a stake and driven into the ground. Before the first frost it had leaves and a few flowers. I get it now.

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