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Magickal Uses of Woods


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#41 LadyHawk

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 05:47 AM

Love this Tana. Many of the trees mentioned are not easily found here (if at all) but my personal favourites still remain rowan, hazel, holly and hawthorn, all of which I have in my garden.

Hope all the oldies (:)) are doing ok, and hello to the newbies I don't know xx

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LadyHawk x

#42 aurora

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 08:58 PM

I have been dreaming a lot about my black mullberry tree, iam very attached to it but to start dreaming about it !! Oh well all shall be revealed no doubt.
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#43 Marshy

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 12:41 AM

Still the blackthorn for me.
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Hal wes žu, folde, fira modor ! Marshy :flyaway:

#44 Abhainn

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 12:53 AM

Still the blackthorn for me.


Marshy! Haven't seen you in a long time! So glad to see you. :)

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#45 aurora

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:30 PM

It is a lovely wood indeed,I make my pins of slumber from this bush,or needles of quite.
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#46 westofthemoon

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:51 AM

Still enjoying this thread, especially when I think about the trees I want to plant around my property. We have a lovely triple birch (three birches grown together) that we plan to make a part of our deck. My favorite trees here are the diamond willow, the alder and the rowan, and someday I'll have a juniper and an elder-- just have to find a small one to transplant.
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#47 Michele

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

Still enjoying this thread, especially when I think about the trees I want to plant around my property. We have a lovely triple birch (three birches grown together) that we plan to make a part of our deck. My favorite trees here are the diamond willow, the alder and the rowan, and someday I'll have a juniper and an elder-- just have to find a small one to transplant.


If you're looking for a small Elder, just take a 5 or 6 inch cutting from an existing tree - take part where the stem is still green. - stick it in some rooting compound and then into a little pot of dirt. Keep it moist. They root like mad things. Mine started from 6 inch cuttings, once they'd started growing new leaves I put them in the ground and within a year they were as tall as I am. If you want berries it helps to trickle your fingertips gently over the flowers and spread the yellow pollen around. The flowers make a great tea and are really good (for me) for "opening the mind" prior to looking back into memory. It's also a highly protective tree if you have a relationship with it. The berries are great for healing a cold/flu or any respitory troubles. And the leaves can be used to heal all sorts of skin problems. It has such strong associations that in folklore it was known as the "poor man's medicine chest". It has very strong pagan/craft associations in Europe and in small villages there's still some people who won't cut one down. These trees can also become guardian trees of a family depending on how you work with them. Tons of wonderful and meaningful folklore about Elders. One of my all-time favourite trees. If you grow one you develop a relationship with but then have to move, just take a cutting and root it and the spirit of that tree will move with you. If you're going to use any of the wood, take live wood not dead wood the tree has chucked out - in my way it is important to keep the spirit of the tree within the piece you are using, so you would take live wood. Carry a piece of the tree with you at all times (and have your kids do the same - it hollows out easily to make into beads) and you will always return to your hearth and always have access to the spirit of the tree. You can also make whistles from the Elder, which are great for communication between the worlds due to the significance of the Elder (depending on what spirits you work with). If you're ever in trouble, just find an Elder tree. If you have any questions.... just ask the Elder. Lovely, magical and spiritual trees, Elders.

M

Edited by Michele, 18 February 2013 - 12:32 PM.

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#48 westofthemoon

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:46 PM

Thank you, Michele! I am going to copy & paste that for my notes. Hopefully I will be able to find an elder...I'm sure I can find one growing around town this summer, or maybe the botanical garden would allow me to take a cutting.
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Wouldst thou like to Live Deliciously? ~ "The VVitch"

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#49 Athena

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:00 AM

I hope this doesn't bother anyone but I found this thread so interesting and I hope it's ok if I add my own areas beliefs to this great thread.



Ash
The ash symbolizes peace of mind, sacrifice, sensitivity and higher awareness Helps the digestive system

Aspen
The Aspen symbolizes clarity of purpose, determination and overcoming fears and doubts Good for stress, allergies,
eczema and neuralgia


Arbutus
The sacred Arbutus symbolizes knowledge Helps the digestive system and used as an antiseptic astringent


Beech
The Beech symbolizes tolerance, past knowledge and
softening criticism Helps the digestive system and for healing wounds, sores and ulcers


Birch
The Birch symbolizes truth, new beginnings
and cleansing of the past Remedy for eczema and skin allergies


Cedar
The Cedar symbolizes cleansing, protection, prosperity & healing Used to help respiratory problems


Cherry
The Cherry tree symbolizes strong exp<b></b>ressi&#111;n, rebirth, new awakenings and compassion Colds, flu, coughs, fever, headaches, indigestion


Elm
The Elm symbolizes wisdom, strength of will and intuition Healing salves for wounds


Maple
The Maple symbolizes the tree of offering, generosity, balance, promise and practicality Helps the digestive system

Oak
The oak symbolizes strength of character and courage Eases blood
problems, improves
circulation and reduces fevers

Pine
The pine tree symbolizes creativity, peace and harmony Heals chest, throat and lung infections, colds, flu and sore throats

Sycamore

Sycamore symbolizes ambition
Astringent

Willow
The willow symbolizes inner wisdom, an open mind with the stability and strength of age and experience. Reduces inflammation, rheumatism, fevers and headaches

Walnut
The Walnut symbolizes clarity and focus, gathering of energy and beginning new projects Skin problems, colds and flu

White Pine
The White Pine symbolizes serenity Heals chest, throat infections, colds, flu and sore throats

The three medicine trees are missing from this list, the Juniper, Tamarac and Pinyon tree are so important I need to give them their very own well thought out post. I hope that's ok . These three trees are so important I just don't see away to make short little exerps all trees are important of course but these three are the ones we have a deep connection to.

Edited by Athena, 21 February 2013 - 07:49 AM.

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#50 Athena

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:58 AM

For native studies my son just did a paper on these three trees so I'm cutting and pasting some of it from his research paper I wish I could credit the sites he used but he didn't have foot notes. I hope this isn't to long but this particular tree is so important to us and was intentionally chained off reservations that I feel it deserves a special post.

Pinyon has a long list of medicinal uses. The pitch was used for a myriad of ailments including cuts, any kind
of skin problem, digestive or bowel troubles, infectious diseases such as colds, influenza, and tuberculosis, venereal disease, sore muscles, rheumatism, fevers, and internal parasites. It was also heated and applied to the face to remove unwanted hair or prevent sunburn. The inner bark was eaten as an emergency ration or made
into an expectorant tea. The needles were chewed and swallowed to increase perspiration to relieve fevers. Buds were chewed and made into a poultice for burns, or dried and pulverized to make a fumigant for earaches. Practical uses of pitch included making dyes or paints, gluing arrows, cementing turquoise jewelry, or waterproofing woven water jugs or baskets.Pine nuts were a tremendously valuable food source, and there were many more ways to eat them than just raw or roasted. They could be ground into flour and rolled into balls, made into cakes or gruel, mixed with berries andstored for winter use, mixed with yucca fruit pulp and made into a pudding, kneaded into seed butter and spread on bread, or made into stiff dough, frozen, and eaten like ice cream. Some tribes ground them with the shells for additional flavor. The value of the nuts was increased by their periodicityā€”good cone crops could not be counted on every year. Generally a heavy crop of pine nuts was only expected once every seven years. This often was followed by a smallpox epidemic, perhaps due to many different groups coming together to share the harvest and possibly spreading the disease.
Virtually every other part of the pinyon also had a use. Pollen was used for ceremonial purposes, sometimes
in place of cattail pollen. Pinyon wood was valuable
for house construction since it was resistant to rot and wood-eating beetles, and it was also used to make useful items such as cradles, looms, saddle parts, tools, and toys. Charcoal from pinyon wood made the best black for sand paintings, and pinyons that had been struck by lightning were valued for ceremonial uses.

Edited by Athena, 21 February 2013 - 08:02 AM.

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#51 Athena

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:08 AM

Ok last one promise lol, these two trees I know well because I still use them today for a wide variety of things. I hope I'm not over loading you guys or causing a problem if I am feel free to edit or move as you see fit.

The Tamarac tree is a lovely tree Native Americans used the different parts of the tamarack tree for a variety of applications. The new shoots are nutritious and can be boiled for food. The inner bark can be dried, ground and mixed with other flours. The sap is said to have a sweet flavor.
Tea made from tamarack bark has been used as a laxative, tonic, diuretic, for jaundice, sore throats, headaches, rheumatism and skin ailments such as burns and sores.
The Potawatomi used tamarack tea to treat distemper of horses.
Tamarack roots are used by the Ojibwe to make woven bags and for sewing canoe edges. The Cree, who call tamarack by the name "wachinakin," use parts of the tree for toboggans, snow shoes, canoes and firewood, but their most well-known use is their beautiful and lifelike goose hunting decoys, which are still made from tamarack twigs and are sold as works of art today.

Last but certainly not least is my favorite tree it symbolizes something special to me in some areas it's called red ceder but the juniper I use is Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum).
Juniper needles and boughs had additional protective powers over illness, death, and sorcery. Boughs were hung around the house during epidemics to drive germs away and were considered powerful medicine for driving away evil spirits associated with death. Hunters also rubbed themselves with juniper boughs for protection from grizzlies. Needles were burned ceremonially for their sacred, purifying smoke that could ward off illness, protect from witches, and remove fear of thunder.In contrast to pinyon, most medicinal uses of juniper came from infusions or boiled extracts of branches, twigs, needles, or cones rather than from pitch. Nevertheless, these preparations were used for a list of conditions
just as long and varied: kidney trouble, heart trouble, hemorrhages, stomachaches, headaches, menstrual cramps, colds, fevers, smallpox, flu, pneumonia, venereal disease, diabetes, cholera, tuberculosis, chickenpox, worms, swellings, rheumatism, burns, sore throats, hives or sores, and boils or slivers. A strong decoction of the cones was even used to kill ticks on horses.
The bluish, berry-like cones containing one or two seeds were boiled and eaten, or dried and used to make a drink, or ground into meal and added to water for a drink or to make into cake. They were also pierced and strung for beads. The Okanagan-Colville tribe of British Columbia considered the cones to be poisonous and used them
on bullets or arrowheads to kill people more quickly in warfare, yet they also made a drink from the cones and drank it in the sweathouse.

Edited by Athena, 21 February 2013 - 08:13 AM.

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#52 Aurelian

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:40 PM

Wonderful information, Athena and Michele! +1 for you both :clap:
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"The truth about the world, he said, is that anything is possible. Had you not seen it from birth and thereby bled it of its strangeness it would appear to you for what it is, a hat trick in a medicine show, a fevered dream, a trance bepopulate with chimeras having neither analogue nor precedent, an itinerant carnival, a migratory tentshow whose ultimate destination after many a pitch in many a mudded field is unspeakable and calamitous beyond reckoning." - Cormac McCarthy

#53 Anara

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 01:50 PM

I can't seem to find much of anything on the boards related to ebony wood. I purchased an ebony wand just a few months ago, as I felt drawn to it and decided to experiment a bit. It is aggressively protective, which is in line with what I have been reading about online as far as some of it's associations. Also, in general-just an all around "power booster" or good for any general purpose, type of wand. They don't grow around these parts, and I was wondering, if anyone on the boards has ever been around a live ebony tree and/or worked with ebony or an ebony wand.

Edited by Anara, 14 April 2013 - 09:04 AM.

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#54 Michele

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 02:22 PM

Sorry - I do not know ebony, although I love woods.

M

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#55 Anara

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 02:33 PM

Sorry - I do not know ebony, although I love woods.

M

In my limited experience with it, I can kinda relate it to more of a blackthorn "type" of energy, but it has it's own unique energy to it at the same time. I have also seen ebony described as "dominating". I'd say that's true-so far anyway.

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"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#56 Belwenda

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:24 PM

Ebony is an African tree- the wood my husband used often in his pieces, it sometimes "explodes " while drying; not the most stable exotic to work with and it is a very small tree- resinous. That's all I know
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"For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so" W.S.

#57 Jevne

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 02:41 AM

I started to say that I am interested in learning more about exotic woods; however, I am more interested in exotic trees, as in living entities. I am hoping to find some examples in local botanical gardens and the like, so I can test some magical theories that I am working on. Exotic implies "not around me", so this may prove a challenge.
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#58 Michele

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:26 AM

It is interesting how different the attributes associated to woods can be from tradition to tradition. I wonder if, at one time, there ever was a more universal understanding of them?

M

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#59 aurora

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 12:04 PM

That would be an interesting thing to try and place a time of understanding but I think as we evolved in our spiritual understanding,it must have been a type of horses for courses thing. I know you mean much further back in time but I often think about, well not that often lol,Moses and the burning bush. There is a bush,tho I can't remember where that actually sets a light on its own. Then i go to Isaack Newton and his appletree,which help him with his gravitational theories.So many lores regarding trees, Odin, and the green ash tree,so yes, very interesting M.
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#60 foxman

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:18 PM

I've mentioned elsewhere about Bog-Oak that I got from Drumshanbo in Ireland. Drumshanb is in the Shadow of the Iron Mountains - so called because Gobniu, Smith of the Tuathe De Danaan (Children of Dana) set up house and shop at the foot of the mountains and built his forge there. To go there is to see a magical place - but then all of Ireland is a magical place - even Dublin (which means Black Waters). Whilst I was there I went beyond the pale of Dublin to The Circle in the North where the Lia-Fal stands, unfortunately, when I was there the council had put a fence around it so ten metres from the stone so you couldn't touch it let alone sit on it!

 

 

the other great place is NewGrange which is a Neolithic Chambered Tomb but it is huge and the rear of the monument is as interesting as the entrance into it, and I believe, they have excursions to it at Winter Solstice Eve, so that you can sit in the rear Chamber in the centre of the monument and watch the Mid-winter Sun rise at dawn and flood the passage to the burial cells with Golden Light. When I went for that, the light was sparkling and I felt as though I had been electrified by the Sun - it was the strangest of feelings. I swear I could see the shadows of the dead rise from their tombs and walk down the passage and into the Sun's Light. If you can visit the place, do. And get your own feelings from the site. There are many places to go and the Celtic, Stone Circles around Cork are absolutely superb!

 

Another reason to go is to visit Huntington Castle, Clonegal, in County Carlow, the seat of the Fellowship of Isis. unfortunately, its founder and High Priestess, Olivia Durdin-Robertson, passed into the World of Spirit on 14th November 2013. The last link to the family  and the Fellowship of Isis lies with Pamela Durdin-Robertson, wife and High priestess of Laurence Durdin-Robertson (Olivia's brother) who passed on  some nineteen years previously. foxman


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