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Jalipino Preserves/Jams - Receipe(s) Wanted


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I seem to be getting a decent crop of Jalipinos and as my canning capabilities are limited and my canning experience nill, I thought I would start off with jams which seems to be less involved and dangerous food-poisioning wise, lol. I like spicy and I like sweet, and jams have a lot of suger in them, so I'm thinking of some sort of Jalipino jam or preserve or chutney receipe I can make and use it as a sauce over chicken and/or fish. Has anyone tried this and does anyone have a good receipe that doesn't involve pressure canners but only boiling something then putting wax on top???

 

As an update - my tomatoes are coming in very nicely. The cukes didn't last - it was just too hot for them. I will have to start them earlier next year or skip them all together. The red peppers are also starting to come in. I have now put in some sweet potatos as well as some green-beans, and am waiting to see how they handle the heat. From what I have read peppers grow well in Florida, and the spicier the variety the better they grow in heat, so I may also try some scotch-bonnets as well. The jalipions certainly seem very happy in the Florida sunshine.

 

M

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I seem to be getting a decent crop of Jalipinos and as my canning capabilities are limited and my canning experience nill, I thought I would start off with jams which seems to be less involved and dangerous food-poisioning wise, lol. I like spicy and I like sweet, and jams have a lot of suger in them, so I'm thinking of some sort of Jalipino jam or preserve or chutney receipe I can make and use it as a sauce over chicken and/or fish. Has anyone tried this and does anyone have a good receipe that doesn't involve pressure canners but only boiling something then putting wax on top??? I would dearly like to help you with this, as I've got a few recipes. However, I can't as to, I don't know what you have to heat or boil with, as perce a conventional appliance. Do you have a hot plate, that you can regulate the heat? Tell us what you have, and we'll see if we can alternate or modify the recipes to fit your need. :happy:

 

As an update - my tomatoes are coming in very nicely. The cukes didn't last - it was just too hot for them. I will have to start them earlier next year or skip them all together. The red peppers are also starting to come in.

 

I have now put in some sweet potatos A little tip here for your potatoes, make sure they are covered well within the soil, as there bounty is below the soil, pototoes sweet as well as regular, ( Russet, Red, Yukon Golds ect. ) have a tendency to get sun burned as they raise up from the soil. You may recall on potatoes a tinge of green in spots, or an area that the skin is green, that is sunburn, and can make one sick, if consumed.

as well as some green-beans, and am waiting to see how they handle the heat. From what I have read peppers grow well in Florida, and the spicier the variety the better they grow in heat, so I

 

may also try some scotch-bonnets as well. Wowzars, those are brutally hot, you may want to wear plastic gloves when handling those,

" muy caliente " :blobfire:

 

The jalipions certainly seem very happy in the Florida sunshine.

 

M

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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ok, officialy jellious, I have JUST started my planting here in the "North"... It is going to be weeks before I have anything fresh vegetable wise. Also extremly exicted as we bought the house this year, and this is our first year of not having to put everything in pots...

 

Jalapenos - We tend to put in about three plants of them every year, last year we got about 4 picking from them making about 50 peppers, I strong them out and dried them for latter use. I find that they dry very well as long as you can find someplace that is fairly dry. Keep a little separation between then so they don't want to mold up on you, thinking drying flowers and you are on the right path.

 

With canning, jams, preserves there is really only a few things you have to watch out for, but you REALLY have to watch out for them.

 

Steps:

 

Clean it all, jars, tools, spoons, work area, area around work area.

Clean it all again, just to be sure,

With peppers, gloves are your friends, I wear two pair, powerless latex when working with hot peppers (capsicum can seep though some gloves)

 

Side Note: I was a chef in my previous professional life before I found my true meaning in life, while cleaning about 30 ghost peppers for a chili contest I had only one pair of gloves on, had to pee, took of the gloves, grabbed the boys....... pain..... lots and lots of pain. Long pain

 

If you want HOT, keep the seeds and the inner membrane of the pepper, if you want the flavor of the pepper with out all the heat, remove the seeds and filet off the inner membrane, that is where the majority of the capsicum of the pepper is.

 

Bacteria is the evil doppelganger here, when it comes to jams, sugar is the supper herio. It is so hygroscopic that it will not allow all but the most resilient of baddies to grow in it since it will dehydrate and kill it by sucking all the H2O out of its cells. (Google Honey is Egyptian tombs and honey as an antiseptic for more info)

 

Ok so I get all excited about food, and if I am going overboard with info someone tackle me...

 

Canning

 

If you can boil water, you can successfully can jellies and preserves with out the use of a wax top. Wax can be tricky, can leak easily, and is not the best of seals. One of the tricks here with a limited kitchen is to keep your jar size small. It will take less heat to bring keep the water at a rolling boil, and with smaller jars the thermal shock of a new jar in the caner is less. This can be pulled off with two hot plates (good ones)

 

Recipe - I know, wow all took me that long to get there :)

 

Here in the northeastern US (Pennsylvania) there is a tried and true family favorite, Strawberry-Rhubarb jam.

 

BareFoot Kitchen Witch has a great website about it

 

http://www.barefootkitchenwitch.com/the_barefoot_kitchen_witc/2009/06/strawberry-rhubarb-jam-the-first-two-batches.html

 

To add your jalapenos, all you would need to do it dice, grate or mash up some of your peppers and add it to the cooking mixture with the sugar, you will be adding so little of it that it really will not effect the mixture at all.

 

Word of caution

 

Capsaicin loves TIME. The longer you allow it to sit in something, the more it will be release from the pepper membrane and into the food. Also, the more you process the raw pepper, the more will be released, so a dice will not be as hot as a mash at first. There will be a point of diminishing return, where no matter how long you leave it in the pantry, it will stay the same temperature.

 

If you are not sure how hot you want your jam to be, you could always make up a large batch of the fruit sugar mixture and then add the pepper in different amounts and then mark the labels, let sit for a few weeks and then try them, see what works best for you.

 

Hope all this helps and I at least was able to provides something you did not already know. if you do indeed take the plunge and make some, would love to hear how it turns out!

 

~Jason

 

Also, if you have access to chipotes, I highly recommend this. Pork, chicken, grilled veg.... DROOL!

 

http://dragonflykitchen.blogspot.com/2010/01/pomegranate-chipotle-sauce.html

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Capsaicin = AWESOME!!! (Off topic, just had to add that because I love it so much. lol)

 

I, being the fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants type person I am, just took my recipe for cherry jam and substituted hot peppers for the cherries and did everything else the same. Probably not the 'best' way to do it, but it worked, everyone liked my jam and no one died after eating it, which is always a bonus. (depending on the person) :wickedwitch:

 

 

Did you replace your stove Michelle? I remember you posted about literally kicking it down the steps when you got rid of it because it can't cook, but you've since posted about learning to can and making jelly?

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All - thank you much for the info... was very informative! I have not replaced my stove and have no intention of so doing, despite the multidude of "do gooders" who keep trying to give me one, lol. I have two hot-plates, and can easily get another. I also have a mum with a stove and a dishwasher for sterilizing! So keep the recipes coming!!

 

M

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  • 3 months later...

Does thejelly come out spicy or sweet? Like would you use it on toast or on meat and vegis or as a dip???

 

M

 

The jelly I ate, was actually both... you can eat it on a toast, on a cracker or anything you like... I wouldn't suggest on meat, though I'd have to say that I never tried and it could turn out to be delicious with meat. Who knows!? :) I know my daughter put some on a celery stick and like it... and I usually eat it on a cracker coz I like the contrast, of sweet and salty added to the spicy, in my mouth lol...

 

The texture of it is really not one that resembles a dip so I wouldn't use it as such... if you want to use it kinda like it, I would suggest to provide a tiny serving spoon, to your guests, to take a tiny spoonful and put in on whatever to eat you provide them with...

 

A lot of people are not use to spicy and I have to say that it's really spicy/hot even for me, and I eat TONS of spicy foods... Nonetheless, you get used to it and it's delicious and it's like an explosion of flavors in your mouth! :)

 

 

By the way, that site AllRecipes.com is really a great one, one of my favorite... I have to say that there's a recipe search site that my friend found and it's fast becoming my favorite of all coz you just have to enter all the ingredients you have in the house and they give you ALL the recipes you can make with those ingredients... They even provide you with with recipes you don't have all the ingredients for, and they let you know which ingredients you're missing...

 

Here's the link: SuperCook.com

 

 

Aika

 

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