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Weight Loss Recipes


Aloe

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Since a lot of us here are currently working at losing a few, I thought maybe we could share some of our low cal/carb/fat/sugar/whatever recipes with each other. :D

 

Currently my hubby needs to lose 15 pounds for his next PT test with the military, and I need to lose 25 to get back to the weight I feel best at. One of my main 'problem foods' is dairy. Cream cheese, heavy whipping cream, cheese of all kinds, buttery cheesy sauces, you get the idea. lol I eat lots of vegetables, but they're usually slathered in one of the previously mentioned substances. So one thing we're looking at doing is making a vegan main dish, and then having our broiled lean meat on the side since we wouldn't be doing the vegan food for moral or disciplinary reasons.

 

So here's what I made last night, I made it up as I went so measurements are approximate.

 

Black Bean and Spinach Soup

 

1/4 of a med. sized red onion minced

1 garlic clove minced

1 quart home canned black beans

8 oz spinach

some olive oil

 

Saute onions and garlic in olive oil until softened and slightly browned, with salt and pepper as desired. I added paprika and savory herb also. Add frozen spinach, and stir till it is hot all through. Add black beans, add water if necessary to reach the consistancy you want. I added parsley when it was finished.

 

Everyone please jump in with your favorite "diet" recipes! :)

 

Maybe some seasoning herbs with 'contracting' properties as opposed to expanding? ;)

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I am doing the Master Cleanse. I've lost seven pounds in less than a week. I feel really good - but it does take willpower.

 

Damn, I'll say willpower! I tried that once, lasted past breakfast and lunch, fainted dead away and had to eat a sandwich when I came back to. I admire anyone who can do it! :cheers:

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Maybe some seasoning herbs with 'contracting' properties as opposed to expanding? ;)

 

Thanks Aloe for the recipe, I'll be sure to try it next time I go shopping and have all the ingredients in stock. I'm not sure about any herbs, but why not add a bit of celery with each meal to reinforce the goal of loosing weight.

 

Edit: I made the soup but had to compromise with adzuki beans, it was still nice and wholesome though.

Edited by Nineheart
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  • 3 weeks later...

This is a recipe that I have been making regularly since I became a vegan; it's tasty, healthy and low-calorie.

 

Simple Homemade Vegan Bolognese

This simple, refreshing and slighty sweet bolognese sauce is perfect for all types of pasta and can be made from common ingredients.

Serves two / three

Ingredients (change measurements according to preference)

1/2 Onion

1 clove of Garlic

4 Mushrooms

2 Tomatoes

1 Tin of Chopped Tomatoes in Juice

1 1/2 handfuls of dried soya mince (4-5 handfuls of minced beef)

 

Seasonings (add according to taste)

Lime juice

Lemon juice

Tomato Pureé (and Tomato Ketchup)

Dried or Fresh Mixed Italian Herbs: Black Pepper, Basil, Thyme, Oregano, Parsley, Sage and Marjoram.

Olive Oil

Cooking and Preparation time: 20~25 minutes

Dice the onions and fry immediately in a small amount of olive oil; next mince (or pureé) the garlic and fry with the onions for a 2-3 minutes. Wash the mushrooms (do not peel) and trim the stalk, slice and fry for 3-5 minutes. Boil some water and soak the dried soya mince in enough vegetable stock to cover. Dice the tomatoes and fry (seeds and all) for 2-3 minutes. Drain the mince, then continue to fry with the seasonings and dried herbs. Cook the spaghetti in boiled water for 10 minutes (until soft). When the spagetti is almost cooked add the tin of chopped tomatoes with fresh herbs and fry for 2 minutes. Serve the spagetti with 4-5 tablespoons of bolognese drizzled with olive oil and a side of mixed salad. To reheat, add a small amount of water and fry or microwave until hot.

 

Good alternatives to try

  • Add or replace any of the ingredients with your favourite vegetables such as French (Green) Beans, Peas, Carrots, Aubergines (Eggplant), Courgettes (Zucchini) and Spinach.
  • If you do not have any chopped tined tomatoes or would like a dry bolognese sauce add a small amount of water instead with the diced tomatoes.
  • For a sweeter taste replace the diced onions with chopped leeks.
  • A nice summer treat is to soak some cooked spaghetti in cold water, then drained and served with the hot bolognese sauce.
  • To create a spicy sauce, add chilli powder or smoked paprika.

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I came across this idea when I was on a low carb programme. Instead of tacos, wrap the ingredients in large lettuce leaves. It is seriously yummy and filling.

 

If you are trying to stay away from potato, rice, etc, cauliflower makes an awesome substitute. For mash potato, simply cook the cauki in your prefered method until soft, then mash adding some light cream cheese and garlic. If it's really soft it will come out smooth and you will hardly notice the difference on Shepphard's pie, etc.

 

for rice, grate it into small pieces, then fry in a non stick pan with 1 teaspoon of oil or less. This can be tossed with spring onion and corn, etc to make fried rice.

 

The stems of cauli cut into cubes, cooked til soft make a great substitute for potato in potato salad.

 

One I have hear but not tried is to cut cabbage into really thin strips and steam to use as a spaghetti substitute in spag bol. Carrot cut with a grater to make ribbon strips could also be used.

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I am doing the Master Cleanse. I've lost seven pounds in less than a week. I feel really good - but it does take willpower.

 

 

 

Be very careful with the master cleanse Absinthe, I know some people who did it (one being a good friend of mine) and they all got Bell's palsy; very nasty indeed, it's been three years now and they are all still suffering the effects. It does depend on your starting nutritional level, and whether you have or are exposed to the virus in the first place.

 

Despite all the hype, the master cleanse will rapidly suppress the immune system and deplete the body of nutrients.

 

 

 

 

 

:)

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I've noticed that a lot of people use Olive Oil when cooking, and with that in mined I'd like to share the following.

 

Anytime you cook a food you run the risk of creating heat-induced damage. Well, suppose there was a type of oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage and so beneficial that it helps you lose weight, promotes heart health and helps to maintain normal cholesterol levels.

 

If you like the above statement then you will want to get some coconut oil. When choosing an oil to cook with you want an oil that will not be damaged by high cooking temperatures. Of all the available oils, coconut oil is the oil of choice for cooking because it is nearly a completely saturated fat (good saturated fat, not the bad kind), which means it is much less susceptible to damage when it is heated.

 

Although mainstream media portrays olive oil as the healthiest oil, this title does not extend to cooking with it. Olive oil is primarily a monounsaturated fat. This means that it has one double bond in its fatty acid structure. Although a monounsaturated fat is inherently more stable than a polyunsaturated fat, the overabundance of oleic acid in olive oil creates an imbalance on the cellular level, which has been associated to an increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease. Olive oil is a smart fat to include in your diet in a non-heated form.

 

Polyunsaturated oils, which include vegetable oils like corn, soy, safflower and canola, are the worst oils to cook with and may result in increased dangers of chronic diseases such as breast cancer and heart disease.

 

 

 

 

 

:)

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I've noticed that a lot of people use Olive Oil when cooking, and with that in mined I'd like to share the following.

 

Anytime you cook a food you run the risk of creating heat-induced damage. Well, suppose there was a type of oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage and so beneficial that it helps you lose weight, promotes heart health and helps to maintain normal cholesterol levels.

 

If you like the above statement then you will want to get some coconut oil. When choosing an oil to cook with you want an oil that will not be damaged by high cooking temperatures. Of all the available oils, coconut oil is the oil of choice for cooking because it is nearly a completely saturated fat (good saturated fat, not the bad kind), which means it is much less susceptible to damage when it is heated.

 

Although mainstream media portrays olive oil as the healthiest oil, this title does not extend to cooking with it. Olive oil is primarily a monounsaturated fat. This means that it has one double bond in its fatty acid structure. Although a monounsaturated fat is inherently more stable than a polyunsaturated fat, the overabundance of oleic acid in olive oil creates an imbalance on the cellular level, which has been associated to an increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease. Olive oil is a smart fat to include in your diet in a non-heated form.

 

Polyunsaturated oils, which include vegetable oils like corn, soy, safflower and canola, are the worst oils to cook with and may result in increased dangers of chronic diseases such as breast cancer and heart disease.

 

 

:)

 

What about ghee (clarified butter) you can heat this quite severely without burning but I don't know if it changes at all with heating.

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I've noticed that a lot of people use Olive Oil when cooking, and with that in mined I'd like to share the following.

 

Anytime you cook a food you run the risk of creating heat-induced damage. Well, suppose there was a type of oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage and so beneficial that it helps you lose weight, promotes heart health and helps to maintain normal cholesterol levels.

 

If you like the above statement then you will want to get some coconut oil. When choosing an oil to cook with you want an oil that will not be damaged by high cooking temperatures. Of all the available oils, coconut oil is the oil of choice for cooking because it is nearly a completely saturated fat (good saturated fat, not the bad kind), which means it is much less susceptible to damage when it is heated.

 

Although mainstream media portrays olive oil as the healthiest oil, this title does not extend to cooking with it. Olive oil is primarily a monounsaturated fat. This means that it has one double bond in its fatty acid structure. Although a monounsaturated fat is inherently more stable than a polyunsaturated fat, the overabundance of oleic acid in olive oil creates an imbalance on the cellular level, which has been associated to an increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease. Olive oil is a smart fat to include in your diet in a non-heated form.

 

Polyunsaturated oils, which include vegetable oils like corn, soy, safflower and canola, are the worst oils to cook with and may result in increased dangers of chronic diseases such as breast cancer and heart disease.

 

 

 

 

 

:)

 

I use coconut oil for a lot of my cooking for that reason, but I don't like the taste of it with onions and garlic. Most people say they can't tell a difference but I always can. lol

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I have a fat free curry recipe which I shall have to dig out to post. It is very yummy, although the ingrediants are a bit strange.

 

That would be fantastic, both myself and my partner love curry and she is really trying to loose weight - that would help a lot :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

FYI,

 

As a follow-up to my previous comment on oil, you may find the following interesting;

 

Olive oil comes from olive, grapeseed oil comes from grape seeds, peanut oil comes from peanuts and canola oil comes from… rapeseed. The plant known as “rape,” from a Latin word for “turnip,” is a domesticated crop in the widely cultivated Brassicaceae family (also known as the mustard family, the cabbage family, or the cruciferous vegetables). Although the word has disturbing connotations today, during World War II people thought nothing of referring to “rapeseed,” and the oil from those seeds was used for industrial purposes.

 

The real problem with the name “rapeseed oil” is that the oil was so toxic that the FDA banned it for human consumption in 1956. So when Canadian growers bred a new variety of rapeseed in the 1970s with a lower content of the toxic erucic acid, they decided they needed a new name for it. The term canola was coined from “Canadian oil, low acid” to convince consumers that this oil was safe to eat. And while “canola” was originally a registered trademark, the term became so widely known that the trademark was eventually abandoned, and “canola” became the default term in many countries for any low-erucic rapeseed oil.

 

Don't take my word for it check out the FDA Site for yourself

 

 

:)

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I'm a huge fan of fruit smoothies - I feel like I'm getting an instant injection of vitamins! For two smoothies:

 

1 c. frozen strawberries

1c. frozen pineapple

1 banana

1c. unsweetened almond, soy or rice milk

7-9 ice cubes

2 droppers of liquid Stevia (all natural non-caloric sweetener)

 

It's super filling, and I lost a couple of lbs. last week by drinking these when I'm hungry!

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I"m pretty careful about what I eat and am generally at a very good weight for myself. But it takes planning. For me as I've gotten older (over 40, I mean), I definitely need to watch the sugar in food. I don't just mean simple sugars like desserts or too much fruit but also dairy and a lot of carbohydrates. You might see good results if you make a promise to eat a large salad twice a day. Avoid the storebought dressings and try your own recipes. I might make a dressing with a bit of vinegar, oil, blueberries, honey and the salad will be mesclun lettuce, jicama, more blueberries, celery, pecans, cucumbers etc. Whatever hits your fancy. Eat the huge salad with the small quantity of nuts and then walk away from the table. Later when you are hungry, drink water, eat more veggies or fruit.

 

At dinner time, have your salad and serve your "main" entree on a smaller dinner plate. Eat the salad first. Eat the small portion of food - don't eat more unless you're hungry.

 

I find if I make the effort to eat a ton of vegetables and fruit supplemented by some nuts and moderate whole grains, I'm good. The more you retrain your taste buds, you'll tend to prefer the lighter foods over heavier starchier stuff. GOOD LUCK!

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Cinnamon and chillies can help speed up the metabolism which can be helpful if your body is as stubborn as mine ;)

 

I unfortunately live with a Notherner where the culinary advancements in pie, meat, chips and gravy has reached a point of being a version of five a day much to the wilting horror of my vegetarian upbringing.

 

I've been spending the past two years 'tricking' my other half into consuming vegetables and even made quorn taste like proper meat enough that he'll eat it without complaining now.

 

The biggest crime sugar commits is it triggers an increase in appetite (Which is why there is always room for dessert somehow...) and why starters are usually served with a sugary sauce or incredibly processed in restaurants and the dreaded ready meal and other such conveniences.

 

Generally, try and eat breakfast within half an hour of waking/getting up it helps set the tone for your metabolism for the rest of the day.

 

Getting peckish? Have a cup of tea (without sugar) or a sugar-free drink (not a fruit juice) and see how you feel after finishing it. The stomach does not separate sensations of hunger and thirst efficiently as a proportion of liquids used by the body comes from the food - it's all good as far as the tummy is concerned.

 

Make it interesting. Spices are worth playing with. If something seems bland or dull or you're just plain bored in the kitchen - play with the herbs in your cupboard. If you are serving food to children or low heat-tolerant partners be careful with the chilli and ginger... :blobfire: (<-- May have been his actual expression)

 

Avoid watching TV or reading whilst eating, food can mysteriously evaporate whilst we are not looking at it.

 

Chew! Surprisingly many people supposedly don't chew their food properly (makes me wonder how they swallow it...) chewing food acts partly as anticipation for eating and the act of then swallowing it is then more fulfilling. It's also better for your stomach in the long term. Children can be the worst for this though wolfing down food like they haven't been fed for a week!

 

Put condiments in a dipping pot or corner instead of slathered on, this can even apply to salad dressings.

 

Oh dear those aren't really recipes are they? I'll have to rummage through my files later to find something suitable, I tend to focus more on attempting to change current habits as partner is a bit of a fusspot and has to do most of the cooking (he's only poisoned me three times... Bigger kitchen in new flat means I can get a chair in there to save my waistline ;))

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mmm! I love roasted cauli, mashed or not! So good broiled with a little oil and salt and pepper. Another good sub for pasta is spaghetti squash.

 

To take off winter... uh, excess... I eat by one rule in the spring: eat half to two-thirds the portion size that I normally would in colder months (depending on the components of the meal and how much I have to trim down), and then fill the rest up with veggies. That's it.

:)

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Guest MissTree

I like brussel sprouts, halved & roasted with a dash of olive oil and a sprinkling of sea salt & pepper. They're yummy too, combined with beef cubes for shish kebabs on the grill.

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I like brussel sprouts, halved & roasted with a dash of olive oil and a sprinkling of sea salt & pepper. They're yummy too, combined with beef cubes for shish kebabs on the grill.

 

Mmm! I'm getting hungry just thinking about that. I love brussel sprouts. :chakrahearts:

 

One of my favorite warm weather snacks is very simple... thinly cut carrots tossed with balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar with a dash of EVOO.

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Guest MissTree

Mmm! I'm getting hungry just thinking about that. I love brussel sprouts. :chakrahearts:

 

One of my favorite warm weather snacks is very simple... thinly cut carrots tossed with balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar with a dash of EVOO.

 

That sounds delicious!

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