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Faces before I sleep


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#41 Gramayr

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 10:05 AM

Maybe I am crazy :witch_bounce: , but if that is the case, I think my "brain farts" smell pretty damn good.

Jevne


:roflhard:

"Great spirits have often encountered violent opposition from weak minds." - Albert Einstein

#42 Pikkusisko

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 10:23 AM

I am confused, ettrick. As a trained psychologist, I am aware of the natural tendencies of the human brain, including closed-eyed hallucinations, which is basically what is being described here. As a scientist, I could probably find at least 100 peer-reviewed research articles that prove that we are all absolutely insane. There is nothing special about any of us, except we share some form of mild psychosis. Perhaps, that is true, but . . .

We have all experienced things that are beyond coincidence, not so easily dismissed as to be just a "brain fart", connections to people and events, that have meaning to us and to our lives. I don't know if the OP saw faces that had any significance in a mundane or magical sense. I do know that I can see and hear places and conversations that are taking place elsewhere and though it isn't perfect, I have some measure of accuracy in regards to understanding the gist of the situation and the emotional context behind it.

Maybe I am crazy :witch_bounce: , but if that is the case, I think my "brain farts" smell pretty damn good.

Jevne


Oh I'm not devaluating ANY of it! Believe me; I'm just commenting on how common these things can be and how easily dismissed. I'm not going to say 'HEY, this psychic is on the same wave length as this person who has yet to have any supernatural experience.' What I'm trying to point out is a lot of people experience these things but when they do they don't explore it, they run to their doctor and buy sleeping tablets. A rare occurence never gets full recognition; it never gets developed or reaped. I'm also not even going to touch on the seriously dangerous topic of assuming mental illness is the unseen, vice versa, but just on how supposedly whack we'd be if we shared any of our experiences to a medical professional.


I'd also like to point out this same eccentric GP advised me to pick my nose to prevent TB and told me people suffering from depression 'look like zombies and are unable to speak'. New GP now.

'There's rules to this stuff. Wishing an event to be changes elements before and after it. Memories will be destroyed, babies will not be born, potential worlds could be evaporated by your wish.' - Prismo


#43 frauholda

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 10:44 AM

Well ettrick I guess we'd all be considered whack as you put in if we shared our experiences not only to a medical professional, but to any of the "mundane" folks out there :lol_witch:

#44 Michele

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 11:33 AM

...I'm of the personal opinion you don't need to be "special" to have a connection with the unseen; you just need to listen. Most have an experience but few go ahead and explore it.


I like this sentence. I have found that sometimes one sees magic as one thing and mundane as another, and that in trying to figure out what was "magical" one can attach a "complicatedness" to things which gets lost into translating and posturing and analyzing and generally keeps one from realizing the continual overlap and non-separateness of the magical and the mundane... that actually keeps one from realizing the daily experiences. I definitely believe that no one needs to be "special" to have a relationship with the unseen world, just to keep their eyes and ears and other senses open and to accept some things rather than letting the "logical mind" try and explain them away - and believe me I can be a big "explainer away", lol.

M


#45 frauholda

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 01:05 PM

I like this sentence. I have found that sometimes one sees magic as one thing and mundane as another, and that in trying to figure out what was "magical" one can attach a "complicatedness" to things which gets lost into translating and posturing and analyzing and generally keeps one from realizing the continual overlap and non-separateness of the magical and the mundane... that actually keeps one from realizing the daily experiences. I definitely believe that no one needs to be "special" to have a relationship with the unseen world, just to keep their eyes and ears and other senses open and to accept some things rather than letting the "logical mind" try and explain them away - and believe me I can be a big "explainer away", lol.

M


Thank you for your post, Michele! Very thought-provoking. I myself tend to over-analize and rationalize everything around me, I guess it is in some parts doubt - but on the other hand it is my tendency to separate "logic" and "magick". Often after my workings instead of just being happy that a spell worked, I try to examine how and why it worked. I suppose I should just come to terms with the fact I cannot know everything. There are things in this world we will never be able to understand, but that doesn't mean they are not working.. Again, thank you for your opinion. I shall think more about it


#46 Jevne

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 04:55 PM

Oh I'm not devaluating ANY of it! Believe me; I'm just commenting on how common these things can be and how easily dismissed. I'm not going to say 'HEY, this psychic is on the same wave length as this person who has yet to have any supernatural experience.' What I'm trying to point out is a lot of people experience these things but when they do they don't explore it, they run to their doctor and buy sleeping tablets.


Thank you for the clarification, ettrick.


#47 TheOn3LeftBehind

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 08:56 PM

I see faces before I fall asleep as well, but have looked at the scientific explanation for this, as I am studying neuroscience. As the brain is trying to change brain waves to allow sleep, it creates a variety of random images, including faces. This could be due to the brain processing memory. This is also a scientific approach to dreams (that the brain is organizing information so it creates random images of people you have seen, even if you don't consciously realize you have seen them). But, of course, everyone is different, and we all know about how our own bodies react.
Woman, I saw you riding on a fence switch with loose hair and belt, in the troll skin, at the time when day and night are equal.” -Reference from C. E. Law of Vastgotaland