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Herbal Remedies for Pets


Whiterose

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For all you herbalists, I was wondering if you have any herbal remedies for pets, mainly cats and dogs? I have googled this but I also want to know if you have used them, if they are safe and if they work. I have a dog and two cats. One of my cats gets continual hot spots and everytime I take her to the vet they give me some expensive antibiotic cream that she just licks off anyway. She can get really self destructive and I don't have money for a vet bill every two months. It seems she has anxiety issues. Its not environmental or contagious as I have moved several times and the other cat doesn't have it. I'm at my wits end. I've tried neosporin, the vet antibiotic, and bag balm. Is there something that I can mix together that is safe for cats? Matbe something I can mix with the bag balm? I trust herbal medicine more than regular anyhow. So anyone got any pet remedies?

 

 

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http://www.masterjules.net/catmed.htm

 

WhiteRose,

 

Hopefully this will help you in some direction. I had a similar experiance with one of my cat's regarding hot spots. He would pick his fur out by the clumps as he stressed over his territory. I made up an oatmeal paste, mixed with feverfew, and as a carrier oil, olive oil. I would lather that on his fur, then I took a sleeve off of a sweatshirt, and made him a garment to wear, so he would not disturb the salve. He was not amused at first, but he got use to his attire, and in time the hot spots were no longer an issue.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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For all you herbalists, I was wondering if you have any herbal remedies for pets, mainly cats and dogs? I have googled this but I also want to know if you have used them, if they are safe and if they work. I have a dog and two cats. One of my cats gets continual hot spots and everytime I take her to the vet they give me some expensive antibiotic cream that she just licks off anyway. She can get really self destructive and I don't have money for a vet bill every two months. It seems she has anxiety issues. Its not environmental or contagious as I have moved several times and the other cat doesn't have it. I'm at my wits end. I've tried neosporin, the vet antibiotic, and bag balm. Is there something that I can mix together that is safe for cats? Matbe something I can mix with the bag balm? I trust herbal medicine more than regular anyhow. So anyone got any pet remedies?

 

 

 

I haven't used herbs much on my pets. I hope CG's suggestion helps!

 

The only thing I've done is make a mild garlic oil to put on wounds that appeared to be getting infection. When I make the garlic oil I smash the cloves and then put them in olive oil to sit for a few minutes. Then strain out the clove, squeezing out as much garlic juice as you can. I remember being told by the herbalist that taught me this that the active properties of the garlic that act as an antibiotic do not remain active for very long but I've never verified that - I just put it on quickly. Also, some garlic can burn the skin, so I always test it on myself first in a spot where my skin is thin (like the underside of my wrist) to make sure that I have enough olive oil diluting the garlic juice to prevent burning.

 

I don't know if this would help hot spots or not, but if the vet's giving you antibiotic cream, garlic (internal or external) is something that I often use for myself in place of antibiotics.

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The oatmeal paste should help. Mild garlic oil, too. Or calendula cream. Just make sure he can't lick it off so it has time to do its job.

 

I haven't treated my cats for anything in years so would have to pull out my books. The only true advice I can give you is never put essential oils on a cat (or give them internally). Cats can't metabolize EO's and will get poisoned easily.

 

Will have a gander at my books later & if I come up with something, will post it.

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The oatmeal paste should help. Mild garlic oil, too. Or calendula cream. Just make sure he can't lick it off so it has time to do its job.

 

I haven't treated my cats for anything in years so would have to pull out my books. The only true advice I can give you is never put essential oils on a cat (or give them internally). Cats can't metabolize EO's and will get poisoned easily.

 

Will have a gander at my books later & if I come up with something, will post it.

 

 

You cannot give garlic to cats, it will kill them, it causes extreme anemia in them....

 

I know that you can give dogs Piriton, not sure about cats, but, could help if it is an alergic reaction...

 

I have just checked and you can give Piriton to cats...

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You cannot give garlic to cats, it will kill them, it causes extreme anemia in them...

 

I was talking externally, not internally. And the jury is out as to whether garlic, in small doses, is truly toxic to cats. It's probably a case of a combination of the dosage and the individual cat's tolerance. I used a combination of a small amount of garlic powder and cornstarch on my cats for years as a flea deterrent and never had difficulties. But I would never give it internally, just to be on the safe side.

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You cannot give garlic to cats, it will kill them, it causes extreme anemia in them....

 

I know that you can give dogs Piriton, not sure about cats, but, could help if it is an alergic reaction...

 

I have just checked and you can give Piriton to cats...

 

I hadn't heard that. I'm pretty sure I've used it on my cats, but none of them have died or gotten sick so either I don't remember correctly, or they were really lucky.

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I was talking externally, not internally. And the jury is out as to whether garlic, in small doses, is truly toxic to cats. It's probably a case of a combination of the dosage and the individual cat's tolerance. I used a combination of a small amount of garlic powder and cornstarch on my cats for years as a flea deterrent and never had difficulties. But I would never give it internally, just to be on the safe side.

 

 

Ah, this explains it because I've only used it externally on my animals, and in a mild oil. I only use it internally for myself.

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Anyone have an internal flea remedy for cats? The flea meds are very expensive, and my cats won't eat anything remotely different or unusual.

 

M

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Thanks everyone! I will try the oatmeal paste first. Her hot spot is broken skin so I'm not going to use the garlic if it has a chance to hurt her. I will let you all know how it went.

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The flea remedy would be much appreciated. That and if anyone has anything for ear mites. Spring is right around the corner and I have a dog also that brings in the fleas. We usually go all out for him and give him a does of frontline because he goes out constantly. But the kitties never go out so something homemade for them might work well.

 

Now our dog is starting to drive us nuts as well. He keeps constantly iching and licking himself to the point he is making hot spots like the cat, but his are black. This is different though, its not anxiety. We have had several vet visits in two states and after some steriod shots, and thyroid tests, and allergy tests, and about $500 later with two stumped vets, I found a dog breading website that suggested it was a systematic yeast infection that is showing itself in the skin. At this point we have all but given up. We have a medicated shampoo for him, he gets a steroid shot every 3 months, we give him baths with baking soda and we spay him down with vinegar. I don't know what else to or what is safe to do. These are the two problems we have been dealing with the animals and its stressing us out because we have no extra money for more vet visists.

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I'm not a holistic vet (nor do I play one on TV) but here goes:

 

Michele, I can find nothing internal for cats with a flea problem, with the possible exception of high-quality brewer's yeast and Vitamin B supplements. But these measures are questionable and don't keep the fleas off, just prevent any allergic reaction to bites. Externally, (if she'll let you) a rinse made of feverfew flowers (make a tea) is a natural pyrethrin. You can add in yarrow, mullein flowers, calendula flowers & celery seeds if you've got them. They'll all contribute not only as a repellant but will soothe the itch from any bites.

 

Whiterose, for the ear mites: a combination of garlic oil, mullein oil & a little Vitamin E should clear it up (1-2 drops per ear & massage around). A chronic yeast infection manifesting itself on the skin doesn't sound likely to me but ... whatever is causing it is probably some sort of immune system deficiency - sort of like human eczema. Dogs can have garlic internally so I'd start with that. Dandelion root & leaf, as well as Burdock root & Cleavers (Clivers, Goosegrass)(use fresh Cleavers or a tincture - this herb loses potency with drying), will help eliminate toxins from the system. Add in some Red Clover to support the Burdock and pack in some more immune support. You can powder everything together and sprinkle a tablespoon on his food daily. Find some flaxseed, evening primrose, borage or fish oil and give that as a supplement, too (you can buy pre-made multi-EFA supplement capsules). Make a rinse of Calendula flowers or rub calendula ointment on the spots to help with the itching.

 

The above is from school and about 6 different books. But a good book to have on the shelf if you have pets is All you Ever Wanted to Know about Herbs for Pets by Mary L. Wulff-Tilford & Gregory L. Tilford. ISBN 1-889540-46-3.

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Whiterose, for the ear mites: a combination of garlic oil, mullein oil & a little Vitamin E should clear it up (1-2 drops per ear & massage around).=

 

Hey thanks for the info, I've got mullein oil that I made for myself, but it hadn't occurred to me that it could be useful on my pets. :)

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I'm not a holistic vet (nor do I play one on TV) but here goes:

 

Michele, I can find nothing internal for cats with a flea problem, with the possible exception of high-quality brewer's yeast and Vitamin B supplements. But these measures are questionable and don't keep the fleas off, just prevent any allergic reaction to bites. Externally, (if she'll let you) a rinse made of feverfew flowers (make a tea) is a natural pyrethrin. You can add in yarrow, mullein flowers, calendula flowers & celery seeds if you've got them. They'll all contribute not only as a repellant but will soothe the itch from any bites.

 

Whiterose, for the ear mites: a combination of garlic oil, mullein oil & a little Vitamin E should clear it up (1-2 drops per ear & massage around). A chronic yeast infection manifesting itself on the skin doesn't sound likely to me but ... whatever is causing it is probably some sort of immune system deficiency - sort of like human eczema. Dogs can have garlic internally so I'd start with that. Dandelion root & leaf, as well as Burdock root & Cleavers (Clivers, Goosegrass)(use fresh Cleavers or a tincture - this herb loses potency with drying), will help eliminate toxins from the system. Add in some Red Clover to support the Burdock and pack in some more immune support. You can powder everything together and sprinkle a tablespoon on his food daily. Find some flaxseed, evening primrose, borage or fish oil and give that as a supplement, too (you can buy pre-made multi-EFA supplement capsules). Make a rinse of Calendula flowers or rub calendula ointment on the spots to help with the itching.

 

The above is from school and about 6 different books. But a good book to have on the shelf if you have pets is All you Ever Wanted to Know about Herbs for Pets by Mary L. Wulff-Tilford & Gregory L. Tilford. ISBN 1-889540-46-3.

 

Thank you so much. I will work on getting some of these herbs. I think they have flax seed at sam's club, the others the only local shop is only open on the week ends so it might be a few days before I can try this.

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Mountain Witch, many apologies if it looked like I was shouting, just I wanted to make sure that the "highlighted" bits stood out...

 

I am aware of the will it/won't it debate with regards to Garlic. I personally won't let my Cats near garlic, even if there is only a very slight chance of it causing them harm. In my opinion, even used externally, they will still consume quantities of it through washing. On the subject of Animal Toxins, I read today that Onion is alledged to be even more toxic than Garlic... I tend to use the If in doubt, don't when the animals health is at risk (not when they need a vet mind)...

 

For a Flea treatment, make a Sage Tincture and apply 5 drops (diluted in 125ml of water) to the cats coat... I think you may be able to use Eucalyptus too, but I don't know the dilution...

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But a good book to have on the shelf if you have pets is All you Ever Wanted to Know about Herbs for Pets by Mary L. Wulff-Tilford & Gregory L. Tilford. ISBN 1-889540-46-3.

 

 

 

Oh that's just great ! Thanks for that M.Witch. I'll be searching for that one. Thanks again.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Mountain Witch, many apologies if it looked like I was shouting, just I wanted to make sure that the "highlighted" bits stood out...

 

No apology necessary but I do believe you could have gotten your point across with a smaller font.

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I'm not a holistic vet (nor do I play one on TV) but here goes:

 

Michele, I can find nothing internal for cats with a flea problem, with the possible exception of high-quality brewer's yeast and Vitamin B supplements. But these measures are questionable and don't keep the fleas off, just prevent any allergic reaction to bites. Externally, (if she'll let you) a rinse made of feverfew flowers (make a tea) is a natural pyrethrin. You can add in yarrow, mullein flowers, calendula flowers & celery seeds if you've got them. They'll all contribute not only as a repellant but will soothe the itch from any bites.

 

Whiterose, for the ear mites: a combination of garlic oil, mullein oil & a little Vitamin E should clear it up (1-2 drops per ear & massage around). A chronic yeast infection manifesting itself on the skin doesn't sound likely to me but ... whatever is causing it is probably some sort of immune system deficiency - sort of like human eczema. Dogs can have garlic internally so I'd start with that. Dandelion root & leaf, as well as Burdock root & Cleavers (Clivers, Goosegrass)(use fresh Cleavers or a tincture - this herb loses potency with drying), will help eliminate toxins from the system. Add in some Red Clover to support the Burdock and pack in some more immune support. You can powder everything together and sprinkle a tablespoon on his food daily. Find some flaxseed, evening primrose, borage or fish oil and give that as a supplement, too (you can buy pre-made multi-EFA supplement capsules). Make a rinse of Calendula flowers or rub calendula ointment on the spots to help with the itching.

 

The above is from school and about 6 different books. But a good book to have on the shelf if you have pets is All you Ever Wanted to Know about Herbs for Pets by Mary L. Wulff-Tilford & Gregory L. Tilford. ISBN 1-889540-46-3.

 

They won't let me put anything on their coats.. the Brewer's Yeast I give 2 of them, the other one won't touch it. They're damn picky little buggers...

 

M

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M,

 

Does your kitty like yogart ? or anything besides cat food?

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Cheese, half & half, roast beef, french fries (only McDonalds, though), salmon. I 've never tried to give them yogart...??

 

M

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Cheese, half & half, roast beef, french fries (only McDonalds, though), salmon. I 've never tried to give them yogart...?? But you do give them " cat food " also...right ?

M

 

http://eartheasy.com...ea_control.html

 

All 7 of my cat's love yogart, I started out with just vanilla flavored. Now this link has some interesting info. in it. I see that you give them, people food, by the list, besides the McD's FF ( lol ) the foods are " whole " foods. The yogart is good for their digestive systems, just like it's properties are good for humans. I'm wondering that if you could put the brewer's yeast in it to mask the scent, since one of your companions won't touch it. The article speaks of brewer's yeast, and is quite informative : in the link says,:

Fresh, whole, raw foods are vital because they provide digestive enzymes and vitamins that can be destroyed by cooking. By feeding your animals a high-quality, natural diet, free of additives and preservatives, you improve their health and dramatically increase their protection from fleas. A healthy animal does not taste or smell as good to fleas. Other natural repellents include vitamin B1 (thiamine) and unpasteurized apple cider vinegar. (See your veterinarian for the correct amount of a vitamin B1 supplement for your pet.) The dosage of apple cider vinegar is about one teaspoon daily in the pet's drinking water. Apple cider vinegar helps strengthen the immune system.

I'm thinking that " if " you put a teaspoon of ACV in their drinking water, and that's all they are allowed to drink is that water, they're own natural thirst will drive them to it. I had to give this to my old gentleman cat, the one obsessed with picking his fur. It did help him, as as he grew older his immune system got compromised due to old age and ailments. We buried him 2 years ago, down by the lake, he had turned 19. Gosh I hope this helps, who wants to have to deal with fleas on a constant basis?!?!?!

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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http://eartheasy.com...ea_control.html

 

All 7 of my cat's love yogart, I started out with just vanilla flavored. Now this link has some interesting info. in it. I see that you give them, people food, by the list, besides the McD's FF ( lol ) the foods are " whole " foods. The yogart is good for their digestive systems, just like it's properties are good for humans. I'm wondering that if you could put the brewer's yeast in it to mask the scent, since one of your companions won't touch it. The article speaks of brewer's yeast, and is quite informative : in the link says,:

Fresh, whole, raw foods are vital because they provide digestive enzymes and vitamins that can be destroyed by cooking. By feeding your animals a high-quality, natural diet, free of additives and preservatives, you improve their health and dramatically increase their protection from fleas. A healthy animal does not taste or smell as good to fleas. Other natural repellents include vitamin B1 (thiamine) and unpasteurized apple cider vinegar. (See your veterinarian for the correct amount of a vitamin B1 supplement for your pet.) The dosage of apple cider vinegar is about one teaspoon daily in the pet's drinking water. Apple cider vinegar helps strengthen the immune system.

I'm thinking that " if " you put a teaspoon of ACV in their drinking water, and that's all they are allowed to drink is that water, they're own natural thirst will drive them to it. I had to give this to my old gentleman cat, the one obsessed with picking his fur. It did help him, as as he grew older his immune system got compromised due to old age and ailments. We buried him 2 years ago, down by the lake, he had turned 19. Gosh I hope this helps, who wants to have to deal with fleas on a constant basis?!?!?!

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

Thank you - I will try it. I like yogurt and usually have some around. In Florida the fleas are always a problem. Due to the warmer climate it's gross-bug central all year 'round. Mosquitos, too, are a problem down here. And ticks. And big bugs that fly and land in your hair - I hate them most of all.

 

M

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ok, so I saved some extra money this week and went out today to get the herbs that I don't have only to find that the herb shop that I use has either moved or closed down. Their online shop is not working either. So, I went to an organic health food shop to try to find the things that were suggested, mainly calendula flowers for my dogs bath. Well, turns out all the things I needed they did not have. So, I racked my brain and remembered reading that tea tree oil is good for all kinds of things and one of those is skin irritation. Of course it was like $22.00 for this little bottle so I asked the lady in that department and she mentioned that it was an antifungal. Bingo. The vet had said that my dog had a yeast infection of the skin. So, after talking with her for about half an hour we came up with a new diet for my dog that has some of the immune support herbs in it that Mountain Witch suggested like the flax seed oil and vitamin E. Also, got him some treats and the tea tree oil, and $45.00 later came home with some hope. Thinking about running him a bath with oatmeal shampoo and a couple drops of the oil. What do think Mountain Witch? I dont want to put him in the bath or put the oil in his shampoo without testing it on him because poor dog is even allergic to aloe. I was thinking about diluting 1 drop in 1 teaspoon of sweet almond oil and puting it on him but I don't want him to lick it off. What would be the best way to test to see if he is allergic to this without him accidentally getting it in his mouth?

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Unfortunately with pets, there's no real way to determine allergy/sensitivity without actual trial. I'd dilute as you suggested and, sorry to say, put a cone collar on him for about 20 minutes. (I'm talking about the type of collar vets use to keep pets from licking/chewing surgery sites). I know pets hate them but a short stint with one to allow the oil to penetrate would be more beneficial than allowing him to ingest what's supposed to be external treatment. You might want to try diluting it in olive oil rather than almond ... it's heavier and may be a bit more soothing to the spots.

 

And just another thought, yeast sometimes responds to vinegar treatment. Dilute 1 teaspoon cider vinegar in 1/2 cup water and dab on the spots. Won't get rid of the infection but may ease the symptoms.

 

Be aware that any diet changes are going to take awhile to notice any effect ... usually a month or more.

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Unfortunately with pets, there's no real way to determine allergy/sensitivity without actual trial. I'd dilute as you suggested and, sorry to say, put a cone collar on him for about 20 minutes. (I'm talking about the type of collar vets use to keep pets from licking/chewing surgery sites). I know pets hate them but a short stint with one to allow the oil to penetrate would be more beneficial than allowing him to ingest what's supposed to be external treatment. You might want to try diluting it in olive oil rather than almond ... it's heavier and may be a bit more soothing to the spots.

 

And just another thought, yeast sometimes responds to vinegar treatment. Dilute 1 teaspoon cider vinegar in 1/2 cup water and dab on the spots. Won't get rid of the infection but may ease the symptoms.

 

Be aware that any diet changes are going to take awhile to notice any effect ... usually a month or more.

 

 

Yea we tried the vinegar and distilled water treatment. It worked to ease the symptoms a little. We don't have a cone like that so I mixed a little with his shampoo and my husband gave him a bath. We'll see how he does tomorrow. He seems happier and more energetic and every half hour or so we check his skin to see if its clearing up. He usually itches non stop but no itching yet....:crossfingers: . Yeah with the diet we are mixing it with the food he is on right now and then we will slowly introduce more of the new food. As soon as I brought it home his nose was glued to the bag. lol. I poured him some and he started scarfing it, lol. He seems to be feeling better already but I will keep and eye on him. Thanks for the help.

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