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Tinctures


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#21 Aloe

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 11:13 PM

Storage conditions: cool, dark (dark bottle a plus) is best. Don't use a metal cap/lid - the fumes from the vinegar will 'eat' the metal. Refrigerated they can keep for up to six months. In the bathroom medicine chest - maybe a month or two.


I can attest to this! I made my first vinegar tincture the same way I do my vodka's, in a canning jar, and the lid rusted away. Lesson learned. lol

"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#22 Whiterose

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 11:47 PM

Ok thanks. I added this to my herbal.

#23 firebird

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 09:54 AM

Anyone recommend a supplier of bottles?????????????? in the UK or a place that will ship here.

#24 ejfinch

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 12:30 PM

Anyone recommend a supplier of bottles?????????????? in the UK or a place that will ship here.


I order mine from Mountain Rose Herbs. They are in the U.S., but will ship internationally. I have had very good experiences with them.


#25 Guest_Chatters_*

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 01:50 PM

Hi Aloe

Thanks for starting a great and informative thread. I've been learning about herbs for a few years now, but still sooooo much to learn, up to now I have simply made teas and put them in my food. Learnt a lot about growing them too. This year I would like to attempt to make tinctures. However as I am still very much learning about herbs, I want to start with the utmost caution. I plan to grow rosemary, mint, lavender, thyme, basil, chamomile, nettle, dandelion - grow wild and sage. I have already regularly grow basil, lavender, mint, thyme and dandelion and nettle. I have tried all of these in teas and often put them food. I have found that I have to be careful with nettle as for some reason nettle does not agree with me - makes me sick, however a little bit in tea is fine.

Anyone have any advice about tinctures in regards what would be best to start with first?, I don't drink alcohol very much and would prefer to use something like vinegar or glycerine instead

I have recently ordered some herbs from Gaia's Garden. I had ran out of my own dried herbs, will let you know what they are like when they come :smile:


#26 Mountain Witch

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:00 PM

Chatters,

There's no 'good one' to start with - it depends on what you see as a need within your household. However, have you thought about making herb-infused vinegars to use on salads? Same procedure. Make something that you think will taste good and be good for you. Thyme and Sage are quite tasty this way.

For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.
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#27 firebird

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:06 PM

I order mine from Mountain Rose Herbs. They are in the U.S., but will ship internationally. I have had very good experiences with them.

Thanks, I'll check them out :vhappywitch:


#28 Aloe

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:32 PM

Hi Aloe

Thanks for starting a great and informative thread. I've been learning about herbs for a few years now, but still sooooo much to learn, up to now I have simply made teas and put them in my food. Learnt a lot about growing them too. This year I would like to attempt to make tinctures. However as I am still very much learning about herbs, I want to start with the utmost caution. I plan to grow rosemary, mint, lavender, thyme, basil, chamomile, nettle, dandelion - grow wild and sage. I have already regularly grow basil, lavender, mint, thyme and dandelion and nettle. I have tried all of these in teas and often put them food. I have found that I have to be careful with nettle as for some reason nettle does not agree with me - makes me sick, however a little bit in tea is fine.

Anyone have any advice about tinctures in regards what would be best to start with first?, I don't drink alcohol very much and would prefer to use something like vinegar or glycerine instead

I have recently ordered some herbs from Gaia's Garden. I had ran out of my own dried herbs, will let you know what they are like when they come :smile:


If you don't need any herbal medicine right now, I'd do what MW said - a tincture that can be used as a salad dressing. Garlic and dried billberry in ACV is tasty on salads, and also great for colds. :)

Sounds like you have a nice herb garden. Is the nettle you react to stinging nettle, or a different type?

"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#29 Absinthe

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 07:46 PM

Fascinating stuff! I'd be really interested to know how you prepare the wild yam cream as I've been having the devil of a time with the hormonal imbalances of menopause and really don't want to go down the drugs road. I would have thought hot flushes/flashes were something to laugh at until I've started experiencing them and I'm all over the place. I love the idea of your pretty bottles.

Nosce te ipsum, et sapere aude


#30 Aloe

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 08:16 PM

Fascinating stuff! I'd be really interested to know how you prepare the wild yam cream as I've been having the devil of a time with the hormonal imbalances of menopause and really don't want to go down the drugs road. I would have thought hot flushes/flashes were something to laugh at until I've started experiencing them and I'm all over the place. I love the idea of your pretty bottles.


I took dried wild yam pieces, and filled my jar 1/3 full and then covered them with warmed coconut oil till the jar was about 2/3 full. I looked up what amount of vitamin E oil I would need to use to preserve the cream, but I can't remember at this point how much that required. I tend to look up the technical information in the books and written recipes I have when I need it and don't memorize it.

To extract, I put a lid on the jar and then put some water in my crock pot. I put a rag in the bottom of the crock pot to prevent the jar from cracking due to direct heat, then set the jar in the water and turned the crock pot on low. I put the lid on the pot to keep the steam in and make sure that the jar was surrounded with heat instead of letting it escape. I looked up the amount of hours it would need to process to get the best extraction of the properties, but I don't remember that part either without looking it up. I'm not at home right now so I can't get my recipe. lol

When the heat extraction was finished, I strained the yam out with cheesecloth. I usually keep it in the refrigerator, but had set it in the cabinet for some reason the day I took that picture.

I had to experiment with dosage, and I'm positive that dosage will be different for everyone (I don't treat anyone but myself so take my experience for what it's worth lol), but what I did is start with a very small amount of cream - like a pea sized drop - and rubbed it into my skin in the area over my ovaries. I then just 'paid attention' to my body the rest of the day to see if I could sense a change. I didn't, so I used the same amount again the next day, just to be sure that I didn't miss something the day before. Still felt nothing. I did it one more day though, and nothing. I skipped a day, then did 1.5 pea sized drops, and I could tell difference. I was doing this during my monthly cycle. The next time my period started, I started out with the 1.5 drops per day, and did another increase to 2 drops and could tell a big difference. Less mood swings, less cramps, and less fatigue.

This method and the times and measurements I used were based on hand written instructions that were given to me by an herbalist I respect, and they worked for me. If there's any errors or reasons not to use wild yam this way, I don't know about them. :)

Edited by Aloe, 05 January 2011 - 08:18 PM.

"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 09:39 PM

Loving this thread!!

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 01:32 PM

Chatters,

There's no 'good one' to start with - it depends on what you see as a need within your household. However, have you thought about making herb-infused vinegars to use on salads? Same procedure. Make something that you think will taste good and be good for you. Thyme and Sage are quite tasty this way.



Thanks Mountain witch, I love both of these herbs in teas, Thyme makes a lovely tea with honey. Your website is lovely, adding it to my bookmarks


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 01:40 PM

If you don't need any herbal medicine right now, I'd do what MW said - a tincture that can be used as a salad dressing. Garlic and dried billberry in ACV is tasty on salads, and also great for colds. :)

Sounds like you have a nice herb garden. Is the nettle you react to stinging nettle, or a different type?



The stinging nettle, I had dried some from my garden and also brought some dried stinging nettle form my health food shop. Reacted to what I brought, I had made an infusion of nettle and left it to infuse over night. I think I may have put too much in, not sure, will try again this year but with less this time.

Talking about colds, I have a really bad cold at the moment and have just had flu, feel like I have been permanently ill since early December. I am drinking lots of honey teas, quite often with a good dollop of grated fresh ginger. Going start taking my echinacea again soon. Just had my usual break from it as I always take this herb in the winter


#34 Michele

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 05:19 PM

Very informative MW... I have not tried making anything medicinal with herbs other than the usual cuppa tea, lol. I usully just buy something from Whole Foods. This is something I will have to look into...

M


#35 Luthien

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 06:32 PM

Whiterose,

Scientifically we know that some herbs' chemical constituents extract better in water and some better in alcohol. You'd need a huge chart (like the one I have) and then have to use grain alcohol & distilled water. A pain for personal use.

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Fantastic thread! I've been making ointments and creams but not tinctures so far.

Anyways, I was wondering if you could give me some information on the chart you are using to identify wich herb (chemical) is better extracted in water or alcohol. I've heard that there are differencies but I can't find any information in my books and the i-net (might look at the wrong places).

Thanks Luthien


#36 Mountain Witch

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:35 PM

Anyways, I was wondering if you could give me some information on the chart you are using to identify wich herb (chemical) is better extracted in water or alcohol. I've heard that there are differencies but I can't find any information in my books and the i-net (might look at the wrong places).

Thanks Luthien


It's one I developed myself using a spreadsheet program. Info is cobbled together from various sources (school & others) and is specific to just the ones I make and in the quantities I make (thereby preventing me from having to do calculations every time).

A good starting book for various preparations is The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook by James Green. ISBN 0-89594-990-3. Written with a sense of humor; great, easy-to-follow instructions; and he's got a couple of tincture charts in there, as well.

For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.
~ Henri Frederic Amiel

You can access my blog and get autographed copies of my books through my website


#37 Whiterose

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 10:06 PM

It's one I developed myself using a spreadsheet program. Info is cobbled together from various sources (school & others) and is specific to just the ones I make and in the quantities I make (thereby preventing me from having to do calculations every time).

A good starting book for various preparations is The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook by James Green. ISBN 0-89594-990-3. Written with a sense of humor; great, easy-to-follow instructions; and he's got a couple of tincture charts in there, as well.



Thanks, I wrote this book and the one you suggested on the pet remedy thread down so I can get these. I have been looking for good quality herb books. I have 3 others I'm studying at the moment but I think if I actually can make some things I will use with the information then I will retain it better. Thanks again you've been a doll.


#38 Luthien

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 08:38 AM

It's one I developed myself using a spreadsheet program. Info is cobbled together from various sources (school & others) and is specific to just the ones I make and in the quantities I make (thereby preventing me from having to do calculations every time).

A good starting book for various preparations is The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook by James Green. ISBN 0-89594-990-3. Written with a sense of humor; great, easy-to-follow instructions; and he's got a couple of tincture charts in there, as well.


Thanks Mountain Witch, I'll have a look at the book.


#39 firebird

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 09:01 AM

A good starting book for various preparations is The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook by James Green. ISBN 0-89594-990-3. Written with a sense of humor; great, easy-to-follow instructions; and he's got a couple of tincture charts in there, as well.


This is on my "must have" list now.
Thanks for recommending :vhappywitch:


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Posted 08 January 2011 - 08:36 PM

I order mine from Mountain Rose Herbs. They are in the U.S., but will ship internationally. I have had very good experiences with them.


LOVE this company! Mountain Rose sells quality at a good price. Their herbs and essential oils are great.