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Traditional Witchcraft


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#41 Solice

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 12:26 PM

I do believe that what goes around, comes around. Its not a karmic statement or because some divine force intervenes, I just believe in cause and effect. If you behave a certain way in life, there are consequences, be they positive or negative. As for diety, yes I do have a personal diety. I dont worship my diety, I give reverence to the qualities of that diety, much like in Buddhism (as I understand it), Buddha was not a god, reverence is paid to the qualities of the buddha. My opinion is that whatever you call "the spark of life" is irrelevant because language is just a tool. If using archetypes to give form to your affinity to that spark, provides comfort or aids you to direct energy, then use it. I dont believe there is any singular way of thinking that encompasses witchcraft. Each to their own. As for a Book of Shadows, I have many journals. I like to make notes, they cover workings, readings, dreams, diary pages, when and where to find certain plants and any other information that I feel is worth making a note of. My Mother always said that a tidy mind is a healthy one, making notes for me, is part of having a tidy mind because Im not juggling endless fragments of information.
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#42 UAINE

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 06:31 PM

I belive we sometimes attribute diety status to a spirit entity we may encounter along our path. We are all a part of the collective energy web which includes the other diminsions which are also chock full of other entities. Being non-human doesn't qualify being to be called a diety or godlike. My belief on where the divine dwells is that they/it are pretty much unreachable for the most part and that we may have contact with those who represent them or avatars we create ourselves in order to connect to the divine. I follow a loosly constucted shamanic path which leads me to some travel and contact with others beings. So far I have not encountered any gods. Some spirits/entities are just as vulneable as we are and have the same foibles and personality differences as we humans do. And then some are very fierce and mighty and merit respect to not interfere with or annoy them, which is when we usually get the slap to the head. Just my opinion and experience.
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#43 Anara

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 12:00 AM

In the article, I will frequently use the word "some" because of the vast amount of traditions out there of Traditional Witchcraft.

What is Traditional Witchcraft? Traditional Witchcraft is not Wicca; Traditional Witchcraft is Traditional Paganism. It is the practice of pre-Wiccan and pre-Christian beliefs (or at least trying to revive the old ways). There are many traditions in Traditional Witchcraft and it should be noted that not all Trads have the same beliefs and practices, but there are basic principles that are followed. Now on to the differences: Wicca is an oath bound, orthopraxic, fertility-based witch cult and mystery religion. Gerald B. Gardner created it in the 1950s and he never actually called it Wicca, but rather "Wica". Traditional Wicca requires its members to be initiated into a coven to actually be considered Wiccan and therefore there is no such thing as a "solitary Wiccan". It is said that in Wicca, one must be initiated in order to receive the Inner Court information (such as the deities "true" names). Depending on the tradition, Traditionalists may or may not require the seeker to be initiated.

Traditional Witchcraft does not follow the Wiccan Rede (created by Gerald B. Gardner) or the Threefold Law. "An ye harm none, do what ye will" is a part of the Wiccan Rede and many people refer to this as a law, when in fact the word "rede" actually means advice. We take responsibility for whatever we do, whether it be harming or healing. Traditionalists know that there is a creative and destructive side of nature; therefore there is no "white" or "black" magic. There are many Eastern philosophies included in Wicca (such as Karma), but Witchcraft originated from Western Europe and Trads prefer to stay true to the old ways which include folk magic. Traditional Witchcraft may be considered a religion to some, while others consider it just a craft, incorporating the craft into their religion. It all depends really.

Wiccans write in a journal that's called a Book of Shadows. They keep their workings, rituals, and other information in it. Some Trads do not keep a journal of their workings because of the belief that one should forget about it after it is done and then some write down their workings and experiences. Personally, I keep a binder full of my own workings that I have written and other information (such as moon cycles, planetary symbols and cycles, rune symbols, herbs and their chemical uses, etc.) that I call a grimoire. Some just call their book a journal. It really doesn't matter what you call it. The land and the ancestors are very important aspects of Traditional Witchcraft. Some Trads call on their ancestors for aid in working. I call on spirits and my ancestors in my workings and in divination; I ask for their wisdom and their guidance. While working outdoors, it is not uncommon for Trads to call on the land spirits or communicate with them. Spirits are an important aspect of Traditional Witchcraft. Ancestors are very important in the Trad. Craft because we searched for the old ways, which come from our ancestors! Spirits can provide us with knowledge and power. Spirits protect us when in working; they are called upon to bring power. We are surrounded by spirits, hence why they're important.

Many Traditional Witches do not believe in deities and many do. It all depends on your beliefs. I don't believe in deities and never have. I believe in and use the power of nature. We don't "worship" nature, though, as many people believe. Fate is a belief held by many. Many believe that your past affects your present and your present affects your future. I don't believe that our future has been laid out for us. This is the Way of Wyrd. Free will is also not believed in, as this is a part of Christian faith and the neo-Pagan movement. Although free will is not believed in by many, there is still common sense; if you manipulate a person's mind to love you and they do not truly do, do you believe it will actually last? Hexes, curses, jinxes, etc. are not shunned in Traditional Witchcraft. If one truly needs to perform a hex or something of the like because the individual, friends, or family were hurt badly, then one would. Hexes and jinxes can be seen as a little slap, whereas curses are more extreme in their power. I have performed a few hexes and one curse; the curse was worked because of the extreme pain it caused a certain friend and I and how badly we were hurt for multiple years. I've seen many "fluffy" sites describing how it's always better to fill a person's heart with love instead of performing hexes, jinxes, and curses and not recognizing the destructive side of nature at all! While it is better to perform "positive" workings, do you really think that filling a person's heart with love will stop them from doing the degrading things they have done?

Traditionalists do not believe in the Summerlands as Wiccans do. We believe that spirits dwell in the spirit world, or Otherworld, and may return as a land spirit or in the form of something else. There are three levels of the world: Underworld, where the spirits dwell and where wisdom is kept, Middle World, what we live in, and the Upperworld, the home of the divine. The belief of afterlife varies from person to person. Hedge-riding is a practice that involves travelling to the spirit world through the use of trance work and other various techniques to alter the conscious mind (including entheogens, which are herbs and other substances used to induce trance) which allows the spirit to leave the body. Shamanic journeying is another practice involving leaving the body for spiritual growth; it is very similar to hedge-riding and is essentially rooted off of it. Common techniques to induce trance involve drumming, rattling, heavy dancing, rocking, entheogens, meditation, flying ointments, and a lot more. Books for the beginner are Hedge-Rider by Eric De Vries, Trance-portation by Diana L. Paxson, and The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft by Christopher Penczak.

Many Traditionalists do not cast circles and some may cast what they call a "compass round" which is basically a circle, but does not have the same use as a circle does to a Wiccan or neo-pagan. Wiccans use circles in order to keep the energy within it and then send it out to the Universe, whereas a compass round is used for protection. A circle in Wicca creates a sacred space to perform their workings, but Trads consider all land sacred and therefore do not need to perform a compass round for a sacred space. Sabbat, or festival, observations and celebrations differ from tradition to tradition. Some Trads observe four and some observe eight. Personally, I observe eight. I do not relate these sabbats to specific legends that Wiccans believe in. I observe them for the change in nature.

Some Trads use the pentagram to symbolize the elements of the earth (Earth, Air, Fire, Water, and Spirit) while others don't believe in these elements because it originates from the East. Many neo-Pagan associate these elements with guardians/watchtowers to the four directions of the earth. Personally, I believe in the energy that flows from the four directions and from above and below. Robin Artisson has explained this in detail on his website. The symbol of this is called the "Witches Foot" or Hagal rune (from the Armanen Futharkh). Animism is a part of Traditional Witchcraft because we believe everything on this earth has a spirit (like plants, trees, etc.), just like Shamans.

Although there are many differences between Wicca, Traditional Witchcraft, and Neo-Paganism we all believe that nature is sacred and seek knowledge of the abyss.



Just wanted to say thanks for this article. I learned a lot from reading this tonight.


~Ruby

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"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#44 reyray

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 07:47 AM

loved reading this post. It is very interesting. i enjoyed it very much.
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#45 Kimberly

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 06:15 PM

Like a breath of fresh air!
Thanks

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#46 Wytchywoman

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Posted 14 January 2012 - 06:20 AM

Thank you Anara for putting that articles out in the front to read. It is a wonderful article for those that are exploring the traditional path to read. :witch_bounce:
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Smile! It makes people wonder what you're up to..

#47 westofthemoon

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 08:04 PM

I've seen many "fluffy" sites describing how it's always better to fill a person's heart with love instead of performing hexes, jinxes, and curses and not recognizing the destructive side of nature at all! While it is better to perform "positive" workings, do you really think that filling a person's heart with love will stop them from doing the degrading things they have done?

This. Drives. Me. Crazy. Especially because that philosophy reminds me waaaay too much of the "turn the other cheek" and "vengeance is Mine" Xtian "commandments" which I grew up having hammered into my skull.

Another great article to have bumped up, one I really enjoyed reading.

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#48 kaenoir

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 01:50 PM

Really enjoyed reading this article. Its very helpful and well written.
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#49 Roger

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 05:08 PM

Good point about trance. You mentioned your belief about deities, do you consider spirits different? Do you recognize individual spirits? I ask this since you mentioned the belief in spirit of nature.
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#50 aurora

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 10:59 PM

Good point about trance. You mentioned your belief about deities, do you consider spirits different? Do you recogniz

e individual spirits? I ask this since you mentioned the belief in spirit of nature.



My experience, or should i say my translation of my experience is trance/ voyerism,hope I spelt that right.That's what it feels like to me.Don't do the deities, so can't comment. Most definitely recognize individual spirits. Never meet a land spirit in person,tho I have some knowledge of them,well some of them. Spirits of nature/plant I class as different to the other two.Gonna get slaughtered now,lol.

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#51 Teacup Witch

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 10:50 PM

I just finished reading your article and I must say that I found it quite refreshing to read. It is so nice to hear someone give information in a down to earth fashion. I must say that I am not one who always like frills, fluffiness etc. Finally I feel that after all these years there are opinions similar to mine.

Thank you...:thankyou:

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Take Care,
Teacup

#52 Jevne

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 12:44 AM

I admit that about 1/2 of the original article does not particularly resonate with me; however, the first few sections contain some interesting comments. I also enjoy the fact that the discussion did not turn into another round of "let's define Trad".

Might be fun to get more opinions on some of the posts here.

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#53 Michele

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:55 PM

I admit that about 1/2 of the original article does not particularly resonate with me; however, the first few sections contain some interesting comments. I also enjoy the fact that the discussion did not turn into another round of "let's define Trad".

Might be fun to get more opinions on some of the posts here.


I don't even bother at this point to define myself, lol. I find the personal responsibility thing an interesting concept as it is often quoted but never seems to be defined as to whom one is responsible, exactly. I have allies and things I believe in, and we work together, and they know what I do so it is seen, known. I've taken responsibility for it. Because if someone/thing sees what you do, then they know you are responsible for it. So to me personal responsibility is much more than merely answering to myself, it is being responsible to and answering to the ways of the things one works with.... their ancestors, their allies/friends, (and for me, personally, god/s). Like if the outcome of a spell is not what one planned - that person is still responsible for the outcome that DID happen, for they are the one who put it in motion.

I think it's also good to remember that the opening thread is an article. Written by one person. It is not subscribed to by all who practice, nor is it taken from a long-lost and well-hidden traditional manual. It is merely what one person believes and they wrote an article about their beliefs.


M

Edited by Michele, 11 October 2015 - 12:33 PM.

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#54 CelticGypsy

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 06:09 PM

As for the elements, I think it is worthwhile to know their meanings and symbols (for how can you work with any element in magic if you don't know what it represents, what to call upon it for?), but at this time I work with more than 4 elements. Water exists, whether one lives in Asia or Europe or TimBuckTwo, lol... it is the symbolism of that element within one's own particular tradition that I think is important when working with an element.

M


I've worked with the Elements and truely enjoy the alliance with them. I can see, taste, touch, smell and feel them. They ring true to me. All of them, except Air, I can not see it, but I do see the manifestation of it with my other senses. It's still truth to me. When I have the nudge to learn more from the Air Element, I study the steam boiling in the tea pot, I can run a spoon through the steam, collect the droplets of air/water, and stir that Element of Air into a mixture I am crafting. I'm still pursuing always the Element of Air. lol !


Regards,
Gypsy

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#55 Aurelia

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 06:22 PM

Voted that up CG, I love the idea of collecting the air element with a spoon!
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#56 Arabella

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 04:01 PM

Hello!

I have a lot of question.

What is Way of Wyrd?

I wish I knew how to perform exercises on a hedge-riding. I've practiced witch's foot but I read that I have to leave an offering to the spirits...

How do you contact of spirits and ancestor?

Where I can find books of bennigers? In Spain, it´s impossible!

Thanks!!

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#57 RavenFlyer

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 04:12 PM

Way of Wyrd is a book by Brain Bates http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/1401905013
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#58 daze113

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 10:20 PM

I really enjoyed reading this,one of the first thing i red when i first came here. 


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#59 willawisp

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:32 AM

I loved reading this post, and all the responses! It's amazing how similar some views are, yet how many different "threads" branch from any particular view. :)


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#60 Forester

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 07:09 AM

Sorry to revive a very old thread, but I can't understand this bit

"I don't believe that our future has been laid out for us... Free will is also not believed in..."

Surely if you don't believe in free will, ie that you can, within the limitations of the present, act as you wish, that is the same as saying that the future is laid out. Free will is the opposite of fate, so to disbelieve in one surely means the belief in the other? Can someone explain what I'm not understanding?

Aside from this confusion, it was a great and informative post, much appreciated and needed!

Edited by Forester, 11 October 2015 - 07:10 AM.

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