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What are you reading ATM

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Guest Landieth
Read it and do a review, and I'll do one for Son of a Witch. If they stink, we'll save each other a lot of time and moolah. :coffee:

 

I'm up for that. :cheers:

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Guest Dreamwalker

I'm a huge fan of the magical realism genre... I just finished The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which was terribly entertaining if simple. It's certainly no One Hundred Years of Solitude, but its entertaining...

 

I'm now on to The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga...I'm in a book club...

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I'd love to be able to say something exciting/cheery and witchcraft related... but mine's really gloomy (although I find it interesting) - I'm reading 'Sleeping Beauty 2, the history of memorial/post-mortem photography. It's for study, it's really interesting.. but I can't imagine anyone rushing out for a look! The other one is 'Camera Lucida' by Roland Barthes.. I'm trying and failing to stick with it. :cry_witch:

 

Looking forward to reading some fiction.. at some point!

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I'd love to be able to say something exciting/cheery and witchcraft related... but mine's really gloomy (although I find it interesting) - I'm reading 'Sleeping Beauty 2, the history of memorial/post-mortem photography. It's for study, it's really interesting.. but I can't imagine anyone rushing out for a look! The other one is 'Camera Lucida' by Roland Barthes.. I'm trying and failing to stick with it. :cry_witch:

 

Looking forward to reading some fiction.. at some point!

 

LOL. This reminds me of when my child was born, I brought book to the hospital to read. It was about Japanese BioWarfare before and during the Second World War. The nurses were horrified that I would read that with a little baby in the room. (Like he could read!) I've also been known to bring books (fiction or non-fiction) about other diseases and warfare to the hospital. I think it's the setting that immediately makes my brain jump to disease/injury.

 

I happen to the hospital again next week and I am trying to break the trend and bring the Seven Pillars of Wisdom with me (although I may bring The Plague, just for fun). I'm actually reading Snow in the Kingdom by Ed Webster right now, but that copy is special and I don't want to risk it. I couldn't call any of these "happy" reads, but they are interesting.

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LOL. This reminds me of when my child was born, I brought book to the hospital to read. It was about Japanese BioWarfare before and during the Second World War. The nurses were horrified that I would read that with a little baby in the room. (Like he could read!) I've also been known to bring books (fiction or non-fiction) about other diseases and warfare to the hospital. I think it's the setting that immediately makes my brain jump to disease/injury.

 

I happen to the hospital again next week and I am trying to break the trend and bring the Seven Pillars of Wisdom with me (although I may bring The Plague, just for fun). I'm actually reading Snow in the Kingdom by Ed Webster right now, but that copy is special and I don't want to risk it. I couldn't call any of these "happy" reads, but they are interesting.

 

Phiguru, thank goodness I'm not alone with my weird choices of books... My mum came over the other day and glanced along the worktops in our kitchen.. she raised one eyebrow and said nothing at first.. but as she scanned along, she noticed that there were at least 4 books (all on dying, momento mori photography and psychological theory regarding art and death)... she simply said "Can't you find anything nice to read?" with a face like Hyacinth Bucket LOL. Thing is, she knows why I'm reading it.. but deep down probably wonders why the hell I chose to write about it. :sickwitch:

 

My tutor said similar the other day... I sat down for a tutorial with her and she said "I must remember to book our sessions in at the beginning of the day, rather than at the end... death at 5pm on on wintery wet night is not my favourite thing! She was grinning when she said it.. but I so understand where you're coming from with reactions from people who see what you're reading.

 

I did giggle about the nurses.. thinking the baby may be absorbing the horrors his mother was reading. LOL Funny how some folk are. :naughty: He was probably too busy watching the telly ;)

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You're not alone , I got told off by the health visitor and my mother for reading the children's act to the tiddle up to get him to go to sleep {hey it works!!}

:twisted_witch: You can make anything sound appealing to babies because it's all in the intonation of your voice , the mental health act is another good one!

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You're not alone , I got told off by the health visitor and my mother for reading the children's act to the tiddle up to get him to go to sleep {hey it works!!}

:twisted_witch: You can make anything sound appealing to babies because it's all in the intonation of your voice , the mental health act is another good one!

 

I've read the Riot Act and the Federalist/Anti-Federalist Papers to my child with the same purpose! I know my mother used to read the newspaper to me because she wanted to read the newspaper and I wanted a story. Even now, I listen to the BBC News if I can't sleep. (When did the news readers stop saying, "Read by"?)

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Re-reading the Sweep series by Cate Tiernan

 

Practical Psychic Self-Defense by Robert Bruce

 

Instant Magick by Christopher Penczak

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Just finished reading "Wicked Weeds" by Amy Stewart. It is from the gardening section at the local Borders. It is about plants that misbehave, are poisonous, noxious, and just bad mannered.

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Charms, Spells & Formulas by Ray Malbrough

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters by Mya Om

Grimoires... by Owen Davies

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I just finished Turn Coat from the Dresden Files and am now reading The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker. I've read that one and Everville before but they are great books.

I also normally read three or four books at once. Drives my wife nuts! That and re-reading books over and over. :coffee:

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Just finished Anne Rice's Sleeping Beauty trilogy and am now getting my teeth into The Destroyer of Worlds by Mark Chadbourn. Anyone read his Age of Misrule trilogy?

:coffee:

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:cauldron:Right now Im reading "Practicing" by Glenn Kurtz its about getting back into practicing music

Listening to the band Metalchurch

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Ewing, Jim PathFinder. Finding Sanctuary in Nature. Findhorn which is one i am not totally through, but it has great practices in it.

Mainly reading ecology/ecotherapy books for college but i have recently bought a few meditations on cd. One that i cant wait to read is Richo, David Shadow Dance: Liberating the Power and Creativity of Your Dark Side, I have been really interested in finding out about my "shadow side"

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I am reading a bok about the Akashic records and just finished the first five sookie stackhouse books (junk food for the brain). I can't even tell you what books are waiting to be read!

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I'm re-reading for the millionth time "The Vesuvius Club" by Mark Gatiss - carrying on where Oscar Wilde left off....

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The Discoverie of Witchcraft - Reginald Scot

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I just finished Turn Coat from the Dresden Files and am now reading The Great and Secret Show by Clive Barker. I've read that one and Everville before but they are great books.

I also normally read three or four books at once. Drives my wife nuts! That and re-reading books over and over. :coffee:

 

I love TGSS and Everville...It's been a while since I'

ve read those. I've been meaning to pick them up again...

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I am reading 'The pickingill papers', and I always have a fiction on the go as well so I am also ploughing through 'Duma key' by Stephen King.

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1. the good, the bad, and the dead by kim harrison

 

2. a few cookbooks (vegatarian, detox, and lower fat) so i dont get to be to unhealthy over the coming winter.

 

and

 

3. a mix of tarot books so i can get my skills up. i can never seem to read one straight through cause different things work for different people and i'm sort of going with what feels right.

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I'm reading The Sorceror's Tale: Faith and Fraud in Tudor England by Alec Ryrie, who is a church historian. It's the life story of Gregory Wisdom, decribed as "a physician, magician, and conummate con-man at work in sixteenth century London". It seems Ryrie found clues to this man's life in church records and has filled it out into a biography of this lesser known magician. Nice little book, and an interesting read so far.

 

Also, I was sent 30 miles away to a different shop to provide sick cover and on my travels picked up "Witchfinders: a seventeenth century English tragedy" by Malcolm Gaskill. It's the story of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne, with plenty footnotes and references and further reading recommendations, everything I like :) It's illustrated with woodcuts, most of which I'm familiar with, but there's one I'd not seen before from 1647, "depicting the world turned upside-down. A dismembered man, an inverted church, and a rabbit chasing a fox [symbolizing] political and religious chaos [of the time]". I've no scanner or I'd show you it.

 

Gaskill also wrote "Hellish Nell: Last of Britain's Witches" about Helen Duncan, the psychic who was tried for witchcraft in the 1940s. Another book of his (which I've not read) is "The Matthew Hopkins Trials"...has anyone read it? He's a good writer, writes a balanced view and provides evidence for his arguments.

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