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Dawn

What are you reading ATM

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Psychic Self Defense by Dion Fortune. I thought it would be dense and boring, but I am actually finding it to be quite informational as well as highly interesting to read.

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I just finished The Third Kingdom, Terry Goodkind.  It's the 14th (I think) book in the Sword of Truth Series.

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I just finished Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk. It was surprisingly entertaining! My roomie/besty had a ragged copy of it and I read it out of boredom in the tub. It was about a childrens book that featured a culling song in its pages that even if the versus were thought would kill the target immediately. A very strange and awkward group go in search of the original spellbook it was taken from for blah blah blah it was a fun mindless ride.( I was amused to see that the book was signed by the author, considering the book was falling apart) I am just about to start the last Sookie book. I have been avoiding it for awhile now but its time to give in  :sad: it was a fun ride while it lasted.

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I just finished The Third Kingdom, Terry Goodkind.  It's the 14th (I think) book in the Sword of Truth Series.

 

 

Haha, we must have been reading it at the same time.  I finished it yesterday as well.  

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I picked up the Omen Machine again last night and finished it a little while ago.  It was definitely worth the re-read.  A lot of little things in there make a lot more sense now than they did on the first read through. 

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I picked up the Omen Machine again last night and finished it a little while ago.  It was definitely worth the re-read.  A lot of little things in there make a lot more sense now than they did on the first read through. 

 

Yeah the Omen Machine was good.  I liked the dark twist he put on the Hedge Witch having to have her mouth sewn shut from childhood.  I also liked how Goodkind, in all his books, differentiates between different beings who can use magic, such as those with the gift who use their own power or constructed spells, witch women, bone women, hedge witches, and those who can use conjuring but are not gifted. There are several sources for magic that are accessible to the different characters in the books. I love the books and hope he keeps writing. 

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With my broken arm I'm finding I have time to read again so I'm working my way through the 'Foxfire" series again.  I'm on # 6 right now and since I usually skip right over # 7 I might be about 1/2 way through. 

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The next Goodkind book is supposed to come out next summer.  He just held week long contests on facebook to promote the DragonCon in Atlanta and the TTK coming out - autographed books, posters, stuff like that.  He said that he has a bunch of stories left to write - more about Richard and Kalahn, lots more about Magda Searus and Merritt.   He doubts he's going to write any sequels to the Law of Nines (which is fine by me) but I wouldn't mind a short history of how they managed to keep the Amnell line going for another thousand years.

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Yeah, sorta.  It's set in the now in what one would assume to be this America.  It's the land that Richard created at the end of the war with Jagang where he sent all of the ungifted.  He had folded the napkin and saw the ink spot had transferred which gave him the idea of folding the Underworld to make a duplicate of the New World.  The main character is an ungifted Rahl in this world.  There's even a plateau that matches where the People's Palace is somewhere in Maine, I think.  I don't know if you remember from the story but he had sent 'something' through to that world when he created it.  The story talks about that and how there is a gateway between Da Hara and the world he created and how the new bad guy who wants to get rid of all magic wants to use the gateway between worlds. 

 

In the Law of 9s when the girl (who is an Amnell) is giving the history of the land she comes from she goes on to say that under Richard's rule there was a 200 year span of time that they now call the Golden Age.  It's kinda like the Renaissance.

 

It's not one of his better works but it's a part of the series so I got it.  The Dollar General stores near me have started carrying hardcovers and they have it on occasion for $5.  You really can't beat that price for a brand new hard cover.

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Have you read The First Confessor, Magda Searus?  He put it out in ebook format and did a run of 300 paperbacks.  That's a good one.  I'd like to find the paperback of that but I don't want to pay collectors prices.

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Thanks.  Yeah I read the first confessor.  It was pretty good.  Didn't know there were paperbacks though.  I would like to find one too. 

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I got the first nine books or so in paperback at Barnes and Noble.  Need to catch up on whatever else has been written since then.

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ATM I am reading a Dresden book called CHANGES by Jim Butcher. Nothing else is worthy to read at same time as this book series is. :tongue:

 

Actually, forgot I had started to read Practical Psychic Self Defense by Robert Bruce. Put it down to read the Dresden book first, however. :D

Edited by Theneva

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Apocalyptic Witchcraft - Peter Grey

Tales From the Fens - Walter Henry Barrett

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Light reading:

Inferno -Sherrilyn Kenyon

 

The Witching Hour- Anne Rice (again lol)

 

Heavy Reading:

The White Goddess-Robert Graves (I started this one but I doubt I'll finish.  I'm just not in to poetic stuff)

 

Grimm's Fairy Tales

 

Mirrors, Stories of Almost Everyone-Eduardo Galeano ( a neat history book with short stanzas that make you question the known history of the world.)

               Excerpt: Hippocrates

 

They call him the father of medicine

New doctors take their oath in his name.

Two thousand four hundred years ago he cured and he wrote.

These are few of the aphorisms born, he said, of his experience:

Experience can fool you, life is short, the art of treatment long, the moment fleeting, and the judgement difficult.

Medicine, the most noble of all arts, falls far behind others thanks to the ignorance of those who practice it.

There is a circulation common to all, a respiration common to all. Everything is related to everything else. 

The nature of the parts of the body cannot be understood without grasping the nature of the organism as a whole. 

Symptoms are the body's natural defenses.  We call them disease, but in reality they are the treatment for the disease.

Eunuchs do not go bald.

Bald men do not suffer from varicose veins.

May meals be your food, and food your medicine.

What cures one will kill another.

If a woman has conceived a boy, she has good color.  If she has conceived a girl, then her color is poor. 

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I have been reading a ton of books about ghosts/spirits, paranormal investigation, and stuff like that. Reading Gerald Brittle's The Demonologist, which is about the Warren's career.

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Blood Magic by Tessa Gratton (book 1)

The Stranger by Camilla Lackberg

The Snow Queen (Andersen)

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The Underworld Initiation - RJ Stewart

 

Mercury's Rise by Ann Parker (historical mystery set in the 1880s)

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