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I've just finished reading 'Witcha - A Book of Cunning' by Nathaniel J Harris. It was lent to me by his family who are also Traditional Witches. I don't know how traditional it is to you guys, but i thought it was really good. Some bit's i didn't really understand and I had to have a dictionary handy because he uses some odd words, but that's probably my lack of experience/ me being simple. Worth a go i reckon :)

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Oh - I haven't read that one yet. (And I just cleared the other wall to put up some more bookshelves, lol!!) How are you liking it??

 

M

 

I've only just started it as I've had some studying for work to do (which galls me as i'd much rather read more interesting books). So far it's wonderful. Whoever you are, and whatever your interest this is a good book to read for a few reasons. Firstly because the use of collected oral history is very much underrated (in my opinion). Secondly because things are changing so quickly in the countryside that it's worth being reminded of what was to understand some issues unique to rural communities. Thirdly because the folk involved are forever kept in script-oh my I could go on.....

 

I also have The Leaping Hare by the same author just itching to be read.

 

 

Babooshka-I've mosied past that book a few times and never quite got around to reading it. Still on my 'for consideration' list.

 

 

 

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I've just finished reading 'Witcha - A Book of Cunning' by Nathaniel J Harris. It was lent to me by his family who are also Traditional Witches. I don't know how traditional it is to you guys, but i thought it was really good. Some bit's i didn't really understand and I had to have a dictionary handy because he uses some odd words, but that's probably my lack of experience/ me being simple. Worth a go i reckon :)

 

Isn't that book about the " how-to's " regarding the Craft. It's focus primarily is upon those aspects commonly called

' operative witchcraft ' ? Someone told me it was very detailed. Did you find that to be true, Babooshka?

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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I picked up a book today at my local thrift shop, The Great Cosmic Mother, Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth, by Monica Sjoo and Barbara Mor. Looked to be interesting in a historical kind of way. From the back cover it reads " This passionate exploration draws on religious traditions, cultures, and archaeological sources from all over the world and throughout history, to recreate for the first time the Goddess religion that is our ancient heritage. " Now I'm not to keen on the Goddess stuff, but for $0.50.... I'll give it a glance through.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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I love George Ewart Evans collection - The Crooked Scythe and Pattern Under the Plough are the two I have read and am most familiar with but I have heard great things about both "Ask the Men..." and the "Leaping Hare" so they are in my "to read" list.

 

I am impatiently waiting for my copy of The Crooked Scythe to arrive...

 

I also ordered a couple of books by Sybil Leek because they were ridiculously cheap, and I'm interesting in learning more about her. I bout a 1969 edition of her "Book of Fortune Telling" for 3.00 and "Diary of a Witch" for 7.00. I received the Fortune Telling book and started reading it, I've never dug to deeply into all the available methods of divination so some of the stuff is new to me, but probably wouldn't be to most people. I've tended to stick with two methods only, so I'm not a good person to review this type of book. lol

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Isn't that book about the " how-to's " regarding the Craft. It's focus primarily is upon those aspects commonly called

' operative witchcraft ' ? Someone told me it was very detailed. Did you find that to be true, Babooshka?

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

It doesn't actually give much in the way of 'how to' instructions, it's more of in depth (well for me it was in depth) look at the lore and way things work, i guess the philosophy behind it. The author uses extracts from his diary and its very much based on his experiences and opinions, so it's not going to be everyones cuppa tea.

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I picked up a book today at my local thrift shop, The Great Cosmic Mother, Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth, by Monica Sjoo and Barbara Mor. Looked to be interesting in a historical kind of way. From the back cover it reads " This passionate exploration draws on religious traditions, cultures, and archaeological sources from all over the world and throughout history, to recreate for the first time the Goddess religion that is our ancient heritage. " Now I'm not to keen on the Goddess stuff, but for $0.50.... I'll give it a glance through.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

Well this book is rather impressive to me, so far it's 431 pages long not including the credit sources and notes and indexes. I'm on page 264 and I just got it the other day for $0.50. It's printed in 1987 and is highly suggestive of the feminism within in women, how the " world " needs to get back to a matriarchal society and get away from the patriarchal. Those who's paths integrate with god/godesses would find the mythology of this book facinating. It sites historical references to different tribes and peoples all over the world who saw their human women as magical spiritual beings in touch with the Godess of " Many Names ", the creator of the world. The authors reference Witches as wise woman, and go in depth as to their function in the pagan religion. ie: healers, midwives, herbalists. As well as tyranny of the torture of these Wise People. Many of the sources given credit to these particular authors compliation of this books are from many authors credited that I've seen here on this forum by different posters. The authors take you also to Britain, Ireland, Wales, Mexico, Egypt, Nepal ,,, you name it..it's talked about as Women's early religion. The authors give credit to Diana, Hectate, Lillith, Kali, and all their various names as the dieties they were. Dark and Light. They speak in detail about Avebury and Stonehenge as energy pathways or currents. I'm finding it a good read, a little dated, but that is to be expected but good knowledge and intelligently written.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Well I finished this book, the last few chapters the authors speak of Man and His Machines as opposed to Man and His relationship with the Earth. It is a good read for those looking into history and paganism, dieties and the like. But keep in mind it is written in the late 1980's and the feminist movement is threaded through this book. I swore I could hear Helen Ready's " I am Woman " at times with this one.:rolleyes_witch:

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Sacred Mask, Sacred Dance (Jones)

 

I Will Fear No Evil (Heinlein)

 

The Element (Sir Robinson)

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Well I finished my thrift store find book, The Great Cosmic Mother, and my review is up on that one with editing my initial post. I've started Triumph of the Moon by Ronald Hutton. I'm plugging along in it, as the type print is

so :censored: small... I'm having trouble reading it, let alone digesting it. That's annoying to say the least.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Well I finished my thrift store find book, The Great Cosmic Mother, and my review is up on that one with editing my initial post. I've started Triumph of the Moon by Ronald Hutton. I'm plugging along in it, as the type print is

so :censored: small... I'm having trouble reading it, let alone digesting it. That's annoying to say the least.

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

 

I am intersted in reading this one, will be keen to know what you thought once you are through it - maybe its one of those books where you get more once you read it a few times - let us know how it goes if you dont give up on it!!!

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I am intersted in reading this one, will be keen to know what you thought once you are through it - maybe its one of those books where you get more once you read it a few times - let us know how it goes if you dont give up on it!!!

 

I found this post earlier on the forum, but I don't know how to just give the post number ( Sorry ) It was originally posted by Lela. I wish I'd read this first before I purchased Hutton's book, I'm having a hard time with it, as it's not holding my attention and the small print just adds to my aggrevation. lol. :rolleyes_witch:

Regards,

Gypsy

A post on the Rune Soup blog has brought to my attention the debate concerning some of Ronald Hutton’s theories put forth in his book Triumph of the Moon.

 

In that blog post there was a link, which lead me to discover Ben Whitmore's book Trials of the Moon: Reopening the Case for Historical Witchcraft - A critique of Ronald Hutton's The Triumph of the Moon.

 

Quote

 

The 'creation myths' of modern witchcraft and Paganism were decisively toppled at the turn of this century in Ronald Hutton's celebrated book, Triumph of the Moon. But did Hutton topple more than just myths? Are some truths also hidden in the rubble? Did paganism really die out centuries ago? Was witchcraft really no more than a fantasy? Were the Gods of Wicca really born out of the Romantic movement? Did Gerald Gardner lie about his initiation into witchcraft? Ben Whitmore has retraced many of Hutton's steps, critically evaluating the evidence, and he now suggests that the truth may be quite different and even more fascinating.

 

Drawing on a wealth of scholarly material, Whitmore demonstrates that the field of Pagan history is anything but barren ground — it is rich and fertile, and we have barely begun to cultivate it.

 

 

 

I thought others might be interested in reading this book, which can be download here almost in full sans front matter, bibliography and index (a complete copy can also be purchased here). I have not read this yet myself, so I cannot comment on the validity of it's content, but my curiosity has been piqued to say the least.

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Picked this up to read this evening: "By Land, Sea and Sky: A Selection of Re-Paganized Prayers and Charms from Volumes 1 and 2 of hte Carmina Gadelica" by Morgan "Láirbhán" Daimler. I am not sure this is a book to read from cover-to-cover, but one to dip into as and when the need arises.

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Picked this up to read this evening: "By Land, Sea and Sky: A Selection of Re-Paganized Prayers and Charms from Volumes 1 and 2 of hte Carmina Gadelica" by Morgan "Láirbhán" Daimler. I am not sure this is a book to read from cover-to-cover, but one to dip into as and when the need arises.

 

I'll have to add that one to my 'to get' list. Have the Carmina Gadelica and it's tough finding the non-Christian parts of it!

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Picked this up to read this evening: "By Land, Sea and Sky: A Selection of Re-Paganized Prayers and Charms from Volumes 1 and 2 of hte Carmina Gadelica" by Morgan "Láirbhán" Daimler. I am not sure this is a book to read from cover-to-cover, but one to dip into as and when the need arises.

 

sounds like a good one to check out, thanks!:chakrahearts:

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You all are reading some interesting books. To be honest I'm mostly reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. :vhappywitch:

 

But, I am also slowly reading Hesiod's "Works and Days" and "The Way of the Green Witch" by Arin Murphy-Hiscock which was recommended to me by a friend. It is fairly good so far.

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Guest Elfyd

Secret Signs & Sigils by Nigel Pennick

 

Magic, Power, Language, Symbol by Patrick Dunn

 

The Red Haired Girl from the Bog by Eileen Duggan

 

Non-TW stuff...recently anything by Simon Winchester or Bill Bryson. If there are ANY ex-pat Brits here please read his "Notes from a Small Island", what the hell, if you are a resident of the Isles you still have to read it.

 

Kindle is a sure sign of the devolution if the human race.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

Edited by Elfyd

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Secret Signs & Sigils by Nigel Pennick

 

Magic, Power, Language, Symbol by Patrick Dunn

 

The Red Haired Girl from the Bog by Eileen Duggan

 

Non-TW stuff...recently anything by Simon Winchester or Bill Bryson. If there are ANY ex-pat Brits here please read his "Notes from a Small Island", what the hell, if you are a resident of the Isles you still have to read it.

 

Kindle is a sure sign of the devolution if the human race.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

 

its funny, as people have gone from reading things on (stone) tablets, to reading things on.....tablets! spooky!

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Guest Elfyd

Winter Night,

 

I feel that it is very sad indeed to see things like multi-use mobile phones and kindles, everything is at one's fingertips, if you want to find a fact you can have it right now, there is no mystery, no work or effort put into the quest for knowledge this is giving us a lazy and unpreciative mass of people. Ask someone a question today and the first thing they do is reach for their little box. Kindle shows us the future where if it is not immediate it is passed over, where there will be little in the way of permanent records, photos, books as a window into one's past. It will be stored electronically yes but this is missing the point. There will be no moments of discovery of "Oh I had forgotten about this photo of Guss on his Vespa, what memories this invokes." and the like. When Kindle has reduced the amount of bound books to the level that they are uneconomical to produce then Kindle will have no source material other than electronic novels produced by computers (as many are now) to suit the support of the Kindle only and the World will be a sadder place.

 

I love books, many of us here do i am sure so lets enjoy them while we can.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

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Winter Night,

 

I feel that it is very sad indeed to see things like multi-use mobile phones and kindles, everything is at one's fingertips, if you want to find a fact you can have it right now, there is no mystery, no work or effort put into the quest for knowledge this is giving us a lazy and unpreciative mass of people. Ask someone a question today and the first thing they do is reach for their little box. Kindle shows us the future where if it is not immediate it is passed over, where there will be little in the way of permanent records, photos, books as a window into one's past. It will be stored electronically yes but this is missing the point. There will be no moments of discovery of "Oh I had forgotten about this photo of Guss on his Vespa, what memories this invokes." and the like. When Kindle has reduced the amount of bound books to the level that they are uneconomical to produce then Kindle will have no source material other than electronic novels produced by computers (as many are now) to suit the support of the Kindle only and the World will be a sadder place.

 

I love books, many of us here do i am sure so lets enjoy them while we can.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

 

Not sure how to take that statement. The ready availability of information does allow us to access other's knowledge with less effort and sometimes that is counter-productive sure, but I also see advantages to it.

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I feel that it is very sad indeed to see things like multi-use mobile phones and kindles, everything is at one's fingertips, if you want to find a fact you can have it right now, there is no mystery, no work or effort put into the quest for knowledge this is giving us a lazy and unpreciative mass of people. Ask someone a question today and the first thing they do is reach for their little box. Kindle shows us the future where if it is not immediate it is passed over, where there will be little in the way of permanent records, photos, books as a window into one's past. It will be stored electronically yes but this is missing the point. There will be no moments of discovery of "Oh I had forgotten about this photo of Guss on his Vespa, what memories this invokes." and the like. When Kindle has reduced the amount of bound books to the level that they are uneconomical to produce then Kindle will have no source material other than electronic novels produced by computers (as many are now) to suit the support of the Kindle only and the World will be a sadder place.

 

I love books, many of us here do i am sure so lets enjoy them while we can.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

I so agree, only because I'm old-schooled and love the organics of the paper and the smell of a good leather. It's like that old saying " The older the violin, the sweeter the music " I'm not dismissing the use of electronic devices by any means, but for this gal, give me pages I can turn and touch and then the smell of the paper on my fingertips. The book came from the life force of the tree, books still retain a life within it's bindings. I can imagine and think it's folly to drop a kindle and get " bibliomancy " .

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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Guest Elfyd

Aloe,

 

Although I understand and agree with your statement about the ready availability of information/knowledge, hence this site and our communication the the point I was making was the route we took and the effort taken. the use of ready info from sources like Google does not have a lasting effect and certainly deters "conventional" schooling. There is NO thought of learning, it is access to facts at the time, not the aquisition of them. Here in the US the average vocabulary is around 40% of its level 100 years ago, okay the school system here is broken but things like this adds to the problem in my opinion.

 

Gypsy,

 

I too am old fashioned and to a great degree a luddite, I feel I must mention this to she where I am in a debate like this. Add to this that I am IN the business of selling printed material, hence I have an insight into this.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

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Aloe,

 

Although I understand and agree with your statement about the ready availability of information/knowledge, hence this site and our communication the the point I was making was the route we took and the effort taken. the use of ready info from sources like Google does not have a lasting effect and certainly deters "conventional" schooling. There is NO thought of learning, it is access to facts at the time, not the aquisition of them. Here in the US the average vocabulary is around 40% of its level 100 years ago, okay the school system here is broken but things like this adds to the problem in my opinion.

 

Gypsy,

 

I too am old fashioned and to a great degree a luddite, I feel I must mention this to she where I am in a debate like this. Add to this that I am IN the business of selling printed material, hence I have an insight into this.

 

FFFF

 

Elf

 

Don't get me wrong, I love printed books, have a huge collection of antique books and an actual library room in my house. I also visit my public library all the time, and my husband jokes that if he wants to see me spontaneously orgasm all he needs to do is take me to a rare books shop. lol (sorry if anyone finds that distasteful)

 

I see mainly advantages that come with easily available facts and interaction on forums such as this in regards to education. Racism and sexism aren't what they were 40 years ago, and I think this is largely due to our world getting smaller due to the ease of communication with people that in the past, only wealthy/well traveled people would get a chance to meet. Also those easily available facts make verification of statements made by people who are in an authority position (such as teachers, community leaders, etc.) much more accurate than it used to be. And yes, I know not everything on the internet is accurate, due diligence in research must be done. lol But I think that whether or not someone will let easy aquisition of facts make them lazy and unappreciative depends on the character of that person. And if we were to accept that the character of the person is a defining point in how technology affects them, then it stands to reason that if a person is inherently energetic and productive, technology and easy access to information would enhance those qualities, not detract from them. Just my current opinion... its been known to change. :)

 

Heh, perhaps I should start a thread on this so I don't totally jack this one.

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Guest Elfyd

Back on topic.

Currently reading "British Birds" by Nesta Robbins and "Cat training for Beginners" by Claude Balls.

 

Happy reading

 

Elf

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