Jump to content
Dawn

What are you reading ATM

Recommended Posts

Qutub - Andrew Chumbley

The Golden Bough - Sir James George Frazer

The Tree of Life - Israel Regardie

 

Reading Qutub very slowly, there is spirit activity in my house every time I read a new section.

The Golden Bough is not holding my attention very well for some reason. I usually love books like this.

This will be about the 10th time I've read The Tree of Life. lol Love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading Qutub very slowly, there is spirit activity in my house every time I read a new section.

The Golden Bough is not holding my attention very well for some reason. I usually love books like this.

This will be about the 10th time I've read The Tree of Life. lol Love it.

 

I've never got into The Golden Bough, Aloe, although I've tried several times. It really annoys me when I think I should like a book but it just doesn't grab my attention. And then it just sits on my bookshelf looking reproachfully at me. (The same with the full Victor Hugo 'Les Miserables' which was a gift in three parts - a lovely edition but I can't lose myself in it.)

Some of my books seem to wrap me up and snuggle. Some of them just want to gather dust. I've got a 'full works' of Shakespeare in three volumes: The Poems, The Tragedies and The Comedies. Absolutely love them and they were only £1.99 each so it's nothing to do with value. - I should add that because they're the full works the print is so tiny that I need reading glasses and a magnifying glass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I've never got into The Golden Bough, Aloe, although I've tried several times. It really annoys me when I think I should like a book but it just doesn't grab my attention. And then it just sits on my bookshelf looking reproachfully at me. (The same with the full Victor Hugo 'Les Miserables' which was a gift in three parts - a lovely edition but I can't lose myself in it.)

Some of my books seem to wrap me up and snuggle. Some of them just want to gather dust. I've got a 'full works' of Shakespeare in three volumes: The Poems, The Tragedies and The Comedies. Absolutely love them and they were only £1.99 each so it's nothing to do with value. - I should add that because they're the full works the print is so tiny that I need reading glasses and a magnifying glass.

 

I am really glad to hear that I'm not the only one Absinthe. I know exactly what you mean about books that wrap you up - some do exactly the same for me. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Brightest Star In The Sky by Marian Keyes!

 

I think possibly my favorite novel yet!

 

 

I've read most of her books and love her - sounds like a good one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Magdalena

The Mabinogion `Branwen daughter of Llyr`

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, today, I made a start on a new podcast (having finished listening to the second book of the Shadowmagic series, "Shadowmagic: Prince of Hazel and Oak" by John Lenahan).

 

"Ravenwood" follows a travelling wise woman healer, Tanyth Fairport on her adventures. This is Book 1 from Nathan Lowell's series, but, as yet, I have not seen mention of any sequels. In the meantime, this free podcast eases my commute.

 

I am also reading a non-fiction title, "The Sacred Isle: Belief and Religion in Pre-Christian Ireland" by Dáithí O hOgain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the moment, I am reading Wyrdworking: The Path of a Saxon Sorcerer, by Alaric Albertsson. I had previously read his Travels Through Middle Earth: The Path of a Saxon Pagan, so when I saw Wyrdworking at the library, I immediately grabbed it. :) In Travels, Albertsson discusses the spirituality and religious beliefs of Anglo-Saxon paganism, whereas Wyrdworking deals with magic.

 

He does a lot with runecraft, and because his path is specifically Anglo-Saxon he uses the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc instead of the Elder Futhark. I appreciate this because I follow an A-S path, but most of the books I've seen focus on the Elder Futhark.

 

Haven't finished the book yet, but so far I'm quite enjoying it.

 

OT, I am also reading a Sherlock Holmes novel, God of the Hive, by Laurie R. King. It's proving very difficult to put down! lol

 

FFF

 

White Bear

Edited by White Bear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Magical Knowledge: Book II - The Initiate by Josephine McCarthy; picked this one up after hearing the author interviewed on a podcast. This is not a how-to book, but an informative book with discerning advice that can be applied to any path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OT, I am also reading a Sherlock Holmes novel, God of the Hive, by Laurie R. King. It's proving very difficult to put down! lol

 

FFF

 

White Bear

 

Sounds great! I just got the Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes for my birthday, and I need to work this in with the other couple of books I am dipping into :wink: - must check out the Laurie R. King book too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds great! I just got the Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes for my birthday, and I need to work this in with the other couple of books I am dipping into :wink: - must check out the Laurie R. King book too!

I'd suggest starting with The Beekeeper's Apprentice. It's the first book in the series. Sherlock Holmes has retired, and is keeping bees as a hobby. Then he meets a young woman who, much to his surprise, matches him for intelligence! :omg: She becomes his apprentice, and they go on to have a series of adventures. One thing I like about this series is that even though she is telling new stories, King remains true to the original characters. And she's really an excellent storyteller.

Edited by White Bear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now, reading a couple of things...

The Secret Doctrine by Madame Blavatsky and The Witches Qabalah by Ellen Cannon Reed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest starting with The Beekeeper's Apprentice. It's the first book in the series. Sherlock Holmes has retired, and is keeping bees as a hobby. Then he meets a young woman who, much to his surprise, matches him for intelligence! :omg: She becomes his apprentice, and they go on to have a series of adventures. One thing I like about this series is that even though she is telling new stories, King remains true to the original characters. And she's really an excellent storyteller.

 

 

thanks for the tip - this book sounds great too! :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amarananda Bhairavan's 'Kali's Oddiya' and 'Medicine of Light'. My husband bought them both together for me. Only just started 'Kali's Oddiya' but feel like I've been let loose in a magical sweet shop. Love it!

 

 

OMG - I totally loved that book! I haven't got M o L yet, but K's O I read years ago and have re-read it about 10 times. Not only is a great book about spirituality, but as a novel (albeit a non-fiction one) it reads so well that one can't put it down. So many of my spiritual beliefs and understandings came from that book.

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now, reading a couple of things...

The Secret Doctrine by Madame Blavatsky and The Witches Qabalah by Ellen Cannon Reed.

 

 

Let me know what you think of the SD. It has been recommended to me so many times, yet every time I try and read it I just can't wade through it. I really do respect MB's work, and I find it odd that I have such a time with the SD. The overall feeling I get when reading it is annoyance, which is really weird and is, I am sure, something more to do with my place right now rather than her writing itself, lol.

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far i think the book is really interesting. However i can see why you might have felt annoyed with it. Sometimes i feel that she projected a type of superiority, and i can sometimes pick it up in her style of writing, her wording. Maybe it's just me though. Overall, i really like it. I have to go back and reread certain passages to make sure i'm getting all of it. It's not an easy read, at least not for me, English is my second language.

Let me know what you think of the SD. It has been recommended to me so many times, yet every time I try and read it I just can't wade through it. I really do respect MB's work, and I find it odd that I have such a time with the SD. The overall feeling I get when reading it is annoyance, which is really weird and is, I am sure, something more to do with my place right now rather than her writing itself, lol.

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far i think the book is really interesting. However i can see why you might have felt annoyed with it. Sometimes i feel that she projected a type of superiority, and i can sometimes pick it up in her style of writing, her wording. Maybe it's just me though. Overall, i really like it. I have to go back and reread certain passages to make sure i'm getting all of it. It's not an easy read, at least not for me, English is my second language.

 

 

Superiority in what sense? Like similar to Dione Fortune saying that American witches shouldn't attempt to practice a British system (ignoring the fact that so many Americans at that time were only a generation or two away from their British ancestors if even that) or in a different way? Just curious because this is a book I've been wanting to read too. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far i think the book is really interesting. However i can see why you might have felt annoyed with it. Sometimes i feel that she projected a type of superiority, and i can sometimes pick it up in her style of writing, her wording. Maybe it's just me though. Overall, i really like it. I have to go back and reread certain passages to make sure i'm getting all of it. It's not an easy read, at least not for me, English is my second language.

 

I think that some of my annoyance stems from the complexity of thought put into something it is accepted is beyond human understanding and as such, rather simple. And as often happens, when something annoys me it can mean that it is a trait I need to look at in myself (I can have a bad habit of over-thinking things, lol).

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got "Medical Herbalism-The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine" by David Hoffmann............awesome reference book!! Very large and very detailed. I just hope that I'm "smart" enough to grasp some of the more technical, medical information contained...yikes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading Huson's Mastering Witchcraft. It's an interesting mix. It's not packed with the fluffy white light of modern day Wicca; not hesitant to talk about curses and other "nasty horrible naughty things that you should never do cos they'll come back to you threefold!!!" :jackoff:—but at the same time it's very ritualistic. Basically you've "got to" have an athame, a rope, a burner etc. and a witch name :yucky: I also found the dedication ritual of speaking the Lord's Prayer backwards on three consecutive nights a little... corny. Still, I'm interested to see where it takes me in the next chapters. 'Twas written 40 years ago and ironically that gives it a fresh air as opposed to the majority of stuff that comes out of publishing houses these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading Huson's Mastering Witchcraft. It's an interesting mix. It's not packed with the fluffy white light of modern day Wicca; not hesitant to talk about curses and other "nasty horrible naughty things that you should never do cos they'll come back to you threefold!!!" :jackoff:—but at the same time it's very ritualistic. Basically you've "got to" have an athame, a rope, a burner etc. and a witch name :yucky: I also found the dedication ritual of speaking the Lord's Prayer backwards on three consecutive nights a little... corny. Still, I'm interested to see where it takes me in the next chapters. 'Twas written 40 years ago and ironically that gives it a fresh air as opposed to the majority of stuff that comes out of publishing houses these days.

 

I loved this book and would highly reccommend it. There are several things to keep in miind when reading it - 1) he is writing for the beginner and states as much, including when he talks about the witch name being "designed to be an indication of the true nature of you as you really are deep down." For pretty, perky, peppy, Polyanna it may well help her much to have a name that upon its use she sees herself as other than her mundane name implies. Everything is done with an intent to help the new-witch access her "deep mind" or inner self and not the cultural self she has been trained into. Our names were given to us by our parents in this lifetime. They reflect this lifetime and this culture, not the part of the witch which is without end. 2) re the tools, he is again addressing the beginner and states that "without them, all but the most powerful born-witch... is powerless when working at a distance from his victim." A beginner would not be able to simply access the current, but with tools that are fetish objects of the current she slowly learns to access and work with it and she also builds up the power within herself as well as using the "setting" to sink down into herself. Again, it is taking her from the mundane training and into the magical for which she has no training. Tools themselves build up power. Can one work without them, yes, but why would one want to use a pushmower when one can weild a riding lawnmower? The power comes from the current and the witch's ability to access it, and the tools build up concentrations of this power that is then immediately accessable. I can ultimately dig just as big a hole with my hands but it's more work so when I have a shovel, why not use it? 3) re the Lord's Prayer Backwards - this man writes very much along the line of things hidden within plain sight (as so many of the books are). There are many rituals for awakening and/or obtaining magical power. IN the xtianized world some of these rituals use the means of backwards or inverse xtianity. I can agree one might feel weird doing it, but I also agree with Huson that if one feels weird doing it then the more the better! Many of these books are written in a way that "those with ears to hear, hear" and others will just skim over it or gather other meanings from it. They often have many levels of meanings and as such can be read years later and seem to have completely different things written in them. But I would recommend this book (but then I'm also a bookworm, lol).

 

M

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved this book and would highly reccommend it. There are several things to keep in miind when reading it [...]

 

Many of these books are written in a way that "those with ears to hear, hear" and others will just skim over it or gather other meanings from it. They often have many levels of meanings and as such can be read years later and seem to have completely different things written in them.

 

You raise some good points and I will keep them in mind when continuing with this book. However, reading it from my personal point of view some things do seem corny, too ritualistic or even plain unnecessary—obviously that's fair enough: I'm not Pollyanna, lol. I went through a very brief experimentation period where I tried having a "witch name" and went and bought an athame, but neither of those never felt like the natural thing for me. Made me feel pretentious if anything :lol_witch: But for someone else it's just the ticket, of course.

 

From this book I'm hoping to get some fresh ideas and new angles for looking at old ideas. Glad to notice that's also happening when I'm reading reviews of the book itself! And I'm pretty sure I'll agree with your last point; years from now I'll probably grab the book again and read it with completely new eyes, with my pockets full of different experiences and thus perhaps even views and opinions, than the ones I have gathered at this point in my life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading Ask the Fellows Who Cut the Hay by George Ewart Evans.

 

Oh - I haven't read that one yet. (And I just cleared the other wall to put up some more bookshelves, lol!!) How are you liking it??

 

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...