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The Land of the Seal People by Duncan Williamson was one,

 

If you enjoy it, Marion, consider reading "The People of the Sea: Celtic Tales of the Seal-Folk" by David Thomson. I actually preferred Thomson's book to Williamsons though both are definitely good reads..

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I really enjoyed Wiliamson's book, and another called "Jessie's Journey" by Jess Smith, a traveller. Hers is one of a trilogy and she name checks Betsy Whyte and it turns out they all know each other. Williamson's book is a collection of fireside stories, mostly featuring someone called Jack...maybe that's a storytellers tradition within travelling folk, I don't know, but it got a bit repetative. There's no mention of witchcraft in either book, but I like reading about travellers lives...another group of people misunderstood and misrepresented...

 

My other christmas goodies were The Book of Symbols: Reflections on Archetypal Images, published by Taschen (LOVE them!) and The Illustrated Signs and Symbols Sourcebook" by Adele Nozedar - both great reference books for my shelf.Another one was "Awaken to Healing Fragrance" by Elizabeth Anne Jones, about aromatherapy. She cites historical users like Cleopatra, Trota and Hildegard of Bingen, with a lot of scientific explanation that I'll probably skip but tones of references and further reading suggestions which I do like. And finally, Gilbert and Gubar's The Mad Woman in the Attic, about women's writing, bit a standard these days.

 

So, a nice stack of books and I ate too much - how was your Christmas? :D

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K. M. Briggs: The Faeries in Tradition and Literature

M. M. Junius: Spagyrics (freakin' awesome book - my new favourite)

And a book about Witchcraft in the Canadian Maritime provinces. (My family come from there.)

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''A Winters Tale'' by Trish Ashley

Girly but very good and

'' Grannys natural Remedies'' also very good helped me remember some stuff i'd forgotten

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I'm reading Tubelo's Green Fire by Shani Oates-interesting read and I'm learning lot's of new words.blush.gif

And, Play Dead by Richard Motanari

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Oh my god, oh my god! I finally got a copy of Jambalaya by Luisah Teish. It's been on my wishlist for a while and it's been recommended so many times to me so I'm super excited. I had no idea what to expect out of this book but at first I may have thought it was going to be some kind of spell/how-to book on Hoodoo--It's so much more than that. Luisah talks about her life and gives words of wisdom and advice to the reader, and at the end of each chapter is an exercise, with the first one on cleansing your home. Good stuff!

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I'm reading Tubelo's Green Fire by Shani Oates-interesting read and I'm learning lot's of new words.blush.gif

And, Play Dead by Richard Motanari

 

I've just added Tubelo's to my wishlist... how are you liking it?

 

M

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M,

I LOVED LOVED LOVED Tubelo's Green Fire.

Read it! Knowing the way your mind works via craft you will get a WHOLE lot out of it to ponder (Just set plenty of time aside!) I'll write more of a thorough review on it later, but I think if you enjoyed Roebuck and RC Letters, you will like what this has to say and illuminate.

 

 

 

I'm thoroughly enjoying the read-about a third of the way through at the moment. I agree with Grimr, having read and enjoyed your posts I think you will find it very interesting.

I also agree with Grimr in setting plenty of time aside (and have a dictionary handy!). There is an awful lot to think about, and it's taking time to absorb, not surprising considering the wealth of knowledge and personal experience shared by the Author.

It is challenging for me as I get frustrated quite often with complex words given to something that can be described in a much simpler way-perhaps I am that pagan in the Cochrane sense of the word! A bit simple! But I like that...

Then in the foreword I read the statement by Robin the Dart (Magister of the Clan) that (paraphrased) 'immersion in complexity is the best way to achieve desconstruction of our misconceptions and pre conceptions' and I find challenge in that-though I may not particularly agree with it.

That said, I know from what I have read so far that this book will remain on my shelf for a good many years to come and be re-visited often.

 

 

 

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G & P thank you both, I will definitely take a look at T'sGF. I have very myuch enjoyed Cochrane's and EJJ's books, so hope to enjoy this one too!

 

M

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I'm currently reading Viridarium Umbris.

 

 

 

That is one I'm looking out for at the moment Lillienrose. How are you finding it?

 

 

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Currently reading Daimonic reality field guide to the otherworld by Patrick Harpur.

 

Still have Tubelo's to read yet as some kind soul gave it to me as a prezzie for that Winter season that has just slipped by. Hey it looks like some good reading times ahead.

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Amarananda Bhairavan's 'Kali's Oddiya' and 'Medicine of Light'. My husband bought them both together for me. Only just started 'Kali's Oddiya' but feel like I've been let loose in a magical sweet shop. Love it!

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I'm thoroughly enjoying the read-about a third of the way through at the moment. I agree with Grimr, having read and enjoyed your posts I think you will find it very interesting.

I also agree with Grimr in setting plenty of time aside (and have a dictionary handy!). There is an awful lot to think about, and it's taking time to absorb, not surprising considering the wealth of knowledge and personal experience shared by the Author.

It is challenging for me as I get frustrated quite often with complex words given to something that can be described in a much simpler way-perhaps I am that pagan in the Cochrane sense of the word! A bit simple! But I like that...

Then in the foreword I read the statement by Robin the Dart (Magister of the Clan) that (paraphrased) 'immersion in complexity is the best way to achieve desconstruction of our misconceptions and pre conceptions' and I find challenge in that-though I may not particularly agree with it.

That said, I know from what I have read so far that this book will remain on my shelf for a good many years to come and be re-visited often.

 

 

 

Maybe an easier way to put this would be if you cant blind them with science baffle them with bullshit!

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And a book about Witchcraft in the Canadian Maritime provinces. (My family come from there.)

 

VERy interested in this. Mind if I ask the title and where you picked it up?

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Maybe an easier way to put this would be if you cant blind them with science baffle them with bullshit!

biggrin.gif Yes, quite often.

Though, there are some things that are worth the effort.

 

 

 

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In the fiction arena I just finished the Sword of Truth series. I'm current working on Enchanter, book two in Sara Douglas's Wayfarer Redemption series.

 

Other craft related books that I am slowly aborbing are"

 

Desk Reference to Nature's Medicine by Steven Foster and Rebecca L. Johnson (national geographic, more scientific with current and tradional uses)

 

The Master book of Herbalism by Paul Beyerl (works with the magical properties as well as the medicinal properties)

 

Herbs by Lesley Bremness (smithsonian handbooks, more of an identification mannual)

 

The Herb Bible by Jennie Harding (This one is awesome... it has recipies and remedies as well as info on the herbs)

 

Every so often I will pick a new herb and I will read what each of these has to say about it and try to absorb how to work with the herb. I will then write it down in my own herbal in my own way for quick reference. Since these are more reference books, I'd be hard pressed to read them cover to cover. My current goal on my path is to memorize how to work with certain herbs, what they look like and where they grow.

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The Nazis and the occult: The Dark Forces Unleashed by the Third Reich by Paul Roland

Hidden Depths: The Story of Hypnosis by Robin Waterfield 

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Kali's Odiyya by Amarananda Bhairavan. Lovely book.

I just bought my daughter a Kindle. Couldn't be doing with one, myself. I love the smell of books (new smell and old smell) as well as the feeling of curling up with a paperback.

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Kali's Odiyya by Amarananda Bhairavan. Lovely book.

I just bought my daughter a Kindle. Couldn't be doing with one, myself. I love the smell of books (new smell and old smell) as well as the feeling of curling up with a paperback.

 

I agree with yi!

my books always end up well worn, rumpled, corners turned - they are genuinely loved. And if I fall asleep reading I wont break it!

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The Brightest Star In The Sky by Marian Keyes!

 

I think possibly my favorite novel yet!

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