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#21 Guest_Oakbuchanan_*

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 07:03 AM

I was thinking about this thread throughout the day. and came to the conclusion your friend may be what i call an elitist asshole. Someone who thinks things they enjoy are the only good things, adn anything they don't like they call shit. Be it books, movies, tv shows, etc....
These are the people I have learned to say piss off to.



LOL Well said! :D


#22 Dawn

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 09:59 AM

LMAO!!!! Ok ! ;):fasttalk:

#23 Cailleach

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 06:09 PM

Off the top of my head I would suggest Aradia Gospel of the witches, the call of the horned piper, the witching way of the hollow hill and whatever mythological or classical books you can lay your hands on. I have a wonderful book on Navaho magic too - very interesting and the Philip Carr Gomm book of English magic is said to be very good, I own it but have lent it out before I could read it. I'm getting it back at our next moot, which PCG is attending so I'll get it signed and then read it myself, I'll let you know what I think then :)
FFFF

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#24 Dawn

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 08:39 PM

Off the top of my head I would suggest Aradia Gospel of the witches, the call of the horned piper, the witching way of the hollow hill and whatever mythological or classical books you can lay your hands on. I have a wonderful book on Navaho magic too - very interesting and the Philip Carr Gomm book of English magic is said to be very good, I own it but have lent it out before I could read it. I'm getting it back at our next moot, which PCG is attending so I'll get it signed and then read it myself, I'll let you know what I think then :)


Cheers bud! :)


#25 Guest_Grimr_*

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 09:37 PM

The Works of Katharine Briggs, Ethel Rudkin, Mrs. Balfour, Lewis Spence, George Ewart Evans. In particular Lincolnshire Folklore by Ethel Rudkin and Pattern under the Plough by George E. Evans. I do like Underworld Inititation by R.J. Stewart as well (Fascinating assertion on Underworld Mythos within the Ballad of Tam Lin and Thomas the Rhymer), Robert Graves White Goddess of course and the works of Emma Wilby. :)

#26 Guest_Oakbuchanan_*

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 09:58 AM

The Works of Katharine Briggs, Ethel Rudkin, Mrs. Balfour, Lewis Spence, George Ewart Evans. In particular Lincolnshire Folklore by Ethel Rudkin and Pattern under the Plough by George E. Evans. I do like Underworld Inititation by R.J. Stewart as well (Fascinating assertion on Underworld Mythos within the Ballad of Tam Lin and Thomas the Rhymer), Robert Graves White Goddess of course and the works of Emma Wilby. :)


I love the ballad of Tam Lin :)

"But the night is Halloween, lady,
The morn is Hallowday,
Then win me, win me, an ye will,
For weel I wat ye may.

"Just at the mirk and midnight hour
The fairy folk will ride,
And they that wad their true-love win,
At Miles Cross they maun bide."

Love it!!... :D....

Heres a link to the rest of it...

Edited by Oakbuchanan, 05 November 2009 - 10:40 AM.
To add link.


#27 Guest_Grimr_*

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 07:52 PM

Oh Well Done Oakbuchanan! It is my favorite ballad along with True Thomas. :D

#28 Cailleach

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 08:20 PM

The Works of Katharine Briggs, Ethel Rudkin, Mrs. Balfour, Lewis Spence, George Ewart Evans. In particular Lincolnshire Folklore by Ethel Rudkin and Pattern under the Plough by George E. Evans. I do like Underworld Inititation by R.J. Stewart as well (Fascinating assertion on Underworld Mythos within the Ballad of Tam Lin and Thomas the Rhymer), Robert Graves White Goddess of course and the works of Emma Wilby. :)



Wonderful, I will be scouting for these :)

FFFF

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#29 Ancestral Celt

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 09:00 PM

Here's my list, taken from the thread, "Needing Good Books!!".

In terms of the practices of traditional witches, books on folklore are probably your best bet. Though I have to say that books, such as the following, have also been helpful to me.

13 Moons by Fiona Walker-Craven
The Art and Practice of Creative Visualization by Ophiel
The Art and Practice of Astral Projection by Ophiel
Aspects of Anglo-Saxon Magic by Bill Griffiths
Augeries and Omens: Magical Lore of Birds by Yvonne Aburrow
The Book of the Cailleach: Stories of the Wise Woman Healer by Gearoid Crualaoich
Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe by Marcel De Cleene
A Complete Guide to Psychic Development by Cassandra Eason
Creative Visualization by Shakti Gawain
Culpeper's Color Herbal
Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic by E. Wilby
Cunning-folk: Popular Magic in English History by Owen Davies
A Dictionary of Plant Lore by Roy Vickery
The Diviner's Handbook: Guide to the Techniques and Applications of Dowsingby Tom Graves
The Discoverie of Witchcraft by Reginald Scot
The Element Encyclopaedia of 5000 Spells: The Ultimate Reference Book for the Magical Arts by Judika Illes
The Element Encyclopedia of Magical Creatures: The Ultimate A-Z of Fantastic Beings from Myth and Magic by John and Caitlin Matthews
The Folklore of Birds by Laura C. Martin
The Folklore of Plants by T. F. Thiselton-Dyer
The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa Von Nettesheim
The Gaelic Otherworld: Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands by John Gregorson Campbell
Healing Threads: Traditional Medicines of the Highlands and Islands by Mary Beith
Herbs for Magic and Ritual by Teresa Moorey
A History of Witchcraft and Magic in Wales by Richard Suggett
Imramma: Undertaking the Soul Journey by Eblamma Raven
Irish Trees: Myths Legends and Folklore by Niall MacCoitir
Irish Witchcraft by St John D Seymour
Irish Witchcraft from an Irish Witch by Lora O'Brien (came from a Wicca background, but this book is about going back to the roots of practices in Ireland)
Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plant-lore and Healing by Stephen Pollington
Liber Noctis: The Handbook of the Sorcerous Arte by G. St. M Nottingham
Light from the Shadows: A Mythos of Modern Traditional Witchcraft by Gwynn
The Little Book of Ancient Plant Lore by T. F. Thistleton-Dyer
Magic and Witchcraft in Scotland by Joyce Miller
Magic in the Middle Ages by Richard Kieckhefer
Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson
Medicinal Plants in Folk Tradition: An Ethnobotany of Britain & Ireland by David E Allen
A Modern Herbal by Maud Grieve
Natural Magic by Doreen Valiente (a Wiccan, yes, but don't dismiss the book)
Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism by Jenny Blain
The Old Sod: The Odd Life and Inner Work of William G. Gray by Alan Richardson and Marcus Claridge
The Pattern Under the Plough by George Ewart Evans
Root and Branch: Traditional British Tree Lore by Paul R. Harris
Rowan Tree and Red Thread: a Scottish Witchcraft Miscellany of Tales, Legends and Ballads by Thomas Davidson
Sea Witch: Practical Oceanic Magic by Paul Holman
Singing with Blackbirds: The Survival of Primal Celtic Shamanism in Later Folk-Traditions by Stuart A. Harris-Logan
Snake Fat and Knotted Threads: An Introduction to Traditional Finnish Healing Magic by Kati Koppana
Thorsons Way of Natural Magic by Nigel Pennick
Weather Lore by Richard Inwards
Witchcraft and belief in Early Modern Scotland by Julian Goodare
Witches, Druids And King Arthur by Ronald Hutton
A Witch's Treasury of the Countryside by Paul Harriss
Witchcraft, Magic and Culture, 1736-1951 by Owen Davies

... just to name a few. ;) I reserve the right to edit this list, however, as I file books under different sections (such as folklore, myth) that may relate to witchcraft. As I find them, I'll add to the list.

Edited by Ancestral Celt, 06 November 2009 - 08:15 PM.
To add titles ....


#30 Guest_Grimr_*

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 06:02 AM

I think this is an EXCELLENT book list Ancestral Celt! I see a few titles I will be adding to my library!

#31 Guest_Oakbuchanan_*

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 08:01 AM

Oh Well Done Oakbuchanan! It is my favorite ballad along with True Thomas. :D


:thumbsup:


#32 Patrima

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 02:29 AM

'Witchcraft Medicine' by Claudia Muller-Ebeling, Christian Ratsch and Wolf-Dieter Storl

If nothing else buy it because some guy named Wolf-Dieter wrote it. How awesome is that? (it's a fantastic book besides)


#33 Stacey

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 05:40 AM

Someone mentioned to me over the weekend that my collection of witch craft books are pretty shit, which, as much as it pains me, i have to agree with.

So come on i need some suggestions. I like historical stuff, i like interesting stuff, books that move me and propel me into that time, old folk lores etc.

So any sugestions would be welcome so i can get my book cred back ;) x


Well it depends on what is defined as 'shit'. I have everything in my collection of books from a really old and battered herbal book by M Grieves to Wicca by Scott Cunningham. Some books are worse than others but I don't think that any one book is 'shit', all books have value whether it teaches you something great or reinforces your opinion that a certain path or certain way is not for you. When I first reaquainted myself with this path I bought everything so I have some Wiccan books and some books that are not.

However at this time I am ignoring Ancestral Celt's list of books because otherwise I will end up spending money......ooooohhhh books!

Edited by Stacey, 10 November 2011 - 05:41 AM.

"The mind is not a book, to be opened at will and examined at leisure. Thoughts are not etched on the inside of skulls, to be perused by an invader. The mind is a complex and many-layered thing." Severus Snape - HP and the Order of the Phoenix

#34 Scott

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 09:40 PM

Greetings All,

Well I located my box o books the other day under a pile of others ... and seeing this *rubs hands* I shall have to have a pencil and paper ready when I unpack it so I can add in here my faves ... actually I suppose I should put as it's own topic!

Gah I am NEVER gonna get any yardwork done at this rate! *Shakes Fist*

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#35 Grymdycche

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 05:56 PM

I'd get writer's cramp typing or writing down all my books, but I suppose it would be good to have a list too.

I suspect this person referred to Dawn's list as "shit" because of some of the wiccan influence, but even those books can have good bits.
I like a lot of Scott Cunningham's stuff, for example. I simply ignore the wiccan influences.
I certainly have some rather.. well, silly books, but even within those are some useful tidbits, some of which inspire or stoke the imagination.
Books are multifaceted tools, use what's good and ignore the rest... and even the best built hammer is pretty useless if what you need at the moment is a box wrench.

Just off the top of my head, in general, I'd say anything by Owen Davies or Ronald Hutton is good, though more of a historical perspective than anything. (I feel that's important to have though). A good number of my books are divination oriented as well.. but I suppose they count.

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#36 sarasuperid

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 06:40 PM

I adore my book collection, but I am always adding. (Lately I have had to trim down my clothing collection to make more room for books, so I can put a few in drawers.

I think it has been said here before, but history, mythology, botanical, and fairytales are as good as any place to start. But in addition to three shelves for those sort of books, I also have three shelves of witchcraft and pagan books, which I regularly thin out the bad ones and endeavor to replace with good ones. My local book store owner knows what I like and keeps a look out for older hardback witchcraft and occult books for me. My recent treasure is a hardback copy of the White Goddess by Robert Graves, but with so many books to read, I am only 70 pages into it.

I would avoid recommending wiccan books to new witches because often they are inexperienced and don't know how or what to filter out. I have read two Scott Cunningham books just to develop my own opinion of them, and I found maybe one new or useful bit in each. (The exception being his wonderful Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs which is a collection of folk information). Solitary Wicca and Witch Crafts were both rather lacking.

I think a solid standing in non-wiccan books is a better start and less time is wasted. If I could have spent a hour reading a good book to find dozens of useful bits or an hour reading a wiccan book to pull out one piece I could perhaps change to be halfway good, I think time is better spent on the well regarded book. I read fast, but I don't have infintate time, and I feel I have already wasted too much time reading crap books just to form my own opinion of them. Why not put just as much or more effort into forming my own opinion of books that are highly recommended :)

"A Craft, a calling, a set of Keys to unlock a particular cosmology that is borne, and born, in the blood of the practitioner, and sets the Work to be done with which one may commune with those who hold the patterns and keys of the life of the practitioner and hir stream. The Work is to be done, and we are to do it." --Aiseling the Bard

#37 ShadowKing

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 09:02 AM

Your collection cant be that bad at least you don't have Solitary Witch: The Ultimate Book of Shadows for the New Generation!!!!!! by none other than the all mighty
Lady Silver Raven-Wolf :twisted_witch:

I find her planetary correspondences on foods and herbs pretty spot on. So I keep it for reference. I just cant stand it when she writes about construction paper and pipe cleaners :sick: and that certain powers were lost to us... that makes no sense.

In my defense when I bought it I was just a seeker........:stars:

Edited by Panis, 23 February 2012 - 09:03 AM.

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#38 CelticGypsy

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 03:37 PM

I just cant stand it when she writes about construction paper and pipe cleaners :sick: and that certain powers were lost to us... that makes no sense.



Oh Panis, it does make sense to those who dared to tread the wicked slopes and go atop Candy Mountain.

I gulp deeply, just thinking about the Legend and Lore.

Regards,
Gypsy

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Terry Pratchett Legends 1 


#39 sarasuperid

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:06 PM

I have a bit of a litmus test, if I meet another witch and they tell me a certain purple book is the best book on witchcraft, well, I politely ignore their opinion thereafter ;)
"A Craft, a calling, a set of Keys to unlock a particular cosmology that is borne, and born, in the blood of the practitioner, and sets the Work to be done with which one may commune with those who hold the patterns and keys of the life of the practitioner and hir stream. The Work is to be done, and we are to do it." --Aiseling the Bard

#40 Whiterose

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 01:37 AM

Oh Panis, it does make sense to those who dared to tread the wicked slopes and go atop Candy Mountain.

I gulp deeply, just thinking about the Legend and Lore.

Regards,
Gypsy



LOL!