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FLOW: The Love of Water


Mariposa

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Hey everyone, I just got done watching that doc Flow about how water shortages is going to be the next thing that causes wars and utimately our demise since our bodies are 70% water. What I didn't realize until I watched this film was that the earth is made up of 70% water just like us.

 

I didn't realize water was such an issue. What is water like in your neck of the woods? I never saw water as being so sacred until thinking about it not being here anymore. What are other people's thought on the film? Water is such an important tool in purifying things I just wonder if we take water for granted that it will always be here. That's my rant for tonight.

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Hey everyone, I just got done watching that doc Flow about how water shortages is going to be the next thing that causes wars and utimately our demise since our bodies are 70% water. What I didn't realize until I watched this film was that the earth is made up of 70% water just like us.

 

I didn't realize water was such an issue. What is water like in your neck of the woods? I never saw water as being so sacred until thinking about it not being here anymore. What are other people's thought on the film? Water is such an important tool in purifying things I just wonder if we take water for granted that it will always be here. That's my rant for tonight.

 

I have not seen this film, never heard of it actually.

 

I live out in the country on a small farm. We have a well and we also are hooked up to "city" water. The well water is fantastic tasting and loaded with minerals. That is what I use for drinking and cooking. A few years ago we got hooked up to the city water when they did a rural water project. That water comes from the Mississippi river...which I personally find sort of scary. We use that for laundering and garden and livestock mainly. When we first built this house, our well would never ever go dry, even when we tried. The well was fed by three underground springs.

 

Then several years later, a large hog operation to the north of us dug out a liquid manure pit. When they did that and did a lot of dirt moving our well started running dry when we would try to water the animals. now, I can't say for sure that they disrupted the underground streams, but I think they did disrupt the two shallower ones.

 

So, there have been lots of times we were out of water for hours while we watied for the level to come back. Also, when the power goes out, we can't get well water (need the electric for the water pump). Being without water for hours does give one a better perspective on not wasting it.

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^^^The movie won an award at Sundance. I only saw it because one of my friends had mentioned it and it happened to be free on mu on demand cable. I'm not sure but you might be able to view a bit at flowthefilm.com.

 

I bet the hog operation had something to do with your well drying up. The film talked alot about situations like yours and it made alot of sense. All I got to say is water is AWESOME! (I'm a child of the 80s) :D

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I have not seen this film, never heard of it actually.

 

I live out in the country on a small farm. We have a well and we also are hooked up to "city" water. The well water is fantastic tasting and loaded with minerals. That is what I use for drinking and cooking. A few years ago we got hooked up to the city water when they did a rural water project. That water comes from the Mississippi river...which I personally find sort of scary. We use that for laundering and garden and livestock mainly. When we first built this house, our well would never ever go dry, even when we tried. The well was fed by three underground springs.

 

Then several years later, a large hog operation to the north of us dug out a liquid manure pit. When they did that and did a lot of dirt moving our well started running dry when we would try to water the animals. now, I can't say for sure that they disrupted the underground streams, but I think they did disrupt the two shallower ones.

 

So, there have been lots of times we were out of water for hours while we watied for the level to come back. Also, when the power goes out, we can't get well water (need the electric for the water pump). Being without water for hours does give one a better perspective on not wasting it.

 

I grew up on well water and still miss its taste!!! Only once did we have to re-drill the well. We also have well water at our cottage in northern WI. That water is full of iron, come out red at first.

 

I live in the city now, and our water comes from Lake Michigan. Its not bad water, but I end up buying bottled water. AS far as I know the lake is doing ok, not up nor down in level.

 

But I have heard that there are areas in the U.S. that have been in a drought for several years now. Some small towns have just closed down due to lack of water.

 

You are right though, we need to conserve as much a we can when we can. Ya never know whats around the next corner!!!!

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Everyones right about that well water. I remember visiting my grandparents in Ohio-and going to the well, and that water was so cold and it even tasted, well clean and fresh! Unfortunately here...our water is not good. We usually have to carry water from communal faucets, 'cause the water in the house is not for drinking. Their are high levels of mercury amongst other things-and thats in the water we are supposed to drink. My personal opinion is that all us European countries have some sort of contamination going on because of Chernobyl back in the 80's, but thats another post.

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