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What connects us on this path?


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#81 Mistflower

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 06:35 PM

I am in South East England but could be anywhere.

I feel a connection to the 1920s/1930s.


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Quick, said the bird, find them, find them,
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The Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot

#82 aefre

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 04:51 PM

Sometimes, being European, I feel that too much emphasis is placed on connecting with 'home'. 

 

Having lived in the US, and Australia, for short periods of my life, I found it odd that people didn't refer to themselves as being American or Ausralian, but described themselves as 'Irish/German' etc. Then I decided to look at my own heritage.

 

I AM English.  I was born in England.  My father's family came from Italy after the first world war, and my mother's family were Irish.  They met, they married, and voila, here I am.

 

A lot of what I practise is Irish.  It is.  There's nothing I can do about, or is there?  It all dates back from who knows how many years, with bits of my Italian Grandmother thrown in.

 

But I am who I am.  I inherited a book of shadows, from my Irish mother.  It goes back for at least 100 years (in European times that's not long LOL), but I read it, I, like others that I can see have done, update it, and work with it to bring it forward and into the modern world.

 

Sometimes, I have a problem with people who think that 'the old ways are the good ways'.  Modern medicine has moved on. 

 

Why would I bother making creams from chamomile and lavender, when some company has already figured it out and done that for me.

 

Nor do I feel the need to connect with 'my path'.  I've been brought up with it. 

 

What I do feel, is a connection to the land, to the sea, and to nature.  And, what I do feel from this forum, is a whole bunch of people who feel exactly the same way. 

 

We're not looking for our 'national' heritage.  We're simply looking for an 'older' way of life.  And we're not living it, by working 9-5 in an office, coming home and drinking fucking Prosecco and pretending we're happy.

 

We're looking for something more.


Edited by aefre, 02 April 2016 - 04:55 PM.

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#83 Solanaceae

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 08:18 PM

 

Sometimes, I have a problem with people who think that 'the old ways are the good ways'.  Modern medicine has moved on. 

 

Why would I bother making creams from chamomile and lavender, when some company has already figured it out and done that for me.

 

Nor do I feel the need to connect with 'my path'.  I've been brought up with it. 

 

What I do feel, is a connection to the land, to the sea, and to nature.  And, what I do feel from this forum, is a whole bunch of people who feel exactly the same way. 

 

We're not looking for our 'national' heritage.  We're simply looking for an 'older' way of life.  And we're not living it, by working 9-5 in an office, coming home and drinking fucking Prosecco and pretending we're happy.

 

We're looking for something more.

 

 

 

 

 

I would just like to bring this up, as I have noticed you say things like this a few times. May I first state, in case there are questions later, that I have great respect for much of modern medicine, and the extensive research done by medical teams to come up with life saving medicines and techniques. And the old ways are not always best. However, the 'new' ways are not always best either. In the western world at least, profit is still the driving force of the medical and pharmacological industries. (All industries really). Many of the medicines, while originally  inspired by natural substances, are now created in a laboratory with synthetic materials. Many more are designed to keep the user coming back for more. More sales, more profit. There is not much interest in curing people, just treating them. We are a renewable source of income when we have to keep coming back for more treatments. These companies that you speak about do not always have our best interest at heart. You don't have to agree, just putting it out there.

 

The homemade cream made with love by a mother or grandmother, and enhanced with healing magick, may very well do a better job then the doctor prescribed cream, created with thoughts of profit, and filled with things like petroleum and hydrocortisone. This is not always the case, but sometimes it is. Should we just forget how to make that cream, because someone else has come up with something else we can just buy and not put any effort into? What happens when one day, for whatever reason, we are left to our own devices? It is not really that far fetched, in some places you can't just run out to the store and buy what ever you need. 


Edited by Solanaceae, 02 April 2016 - 08:22 PM.

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Some are born to sweet delight,

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#84 odalibuc

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 08:51 PM

@Solanaceae While you have some very good points regarding remedies and capitalism in regards to pharmacies, there are some things that medicine can do better, especially when added to home practices. For instance, I'm on an antidepressant that doubles as ADHD medication. When you're stuck in a deep rut from depression, going through the motions of casting a spell or using magic to help with your mood, motivation, sleep cycle, appetite, self-depreciating thoughts, and energy can be too much. Taking the medication allows me to get myself to a point where I can add in my own remedies for whatever symptom is worse on that day, as well as charge crystals to help keep outside influences from triggering my anxiety and any sensory-related meltdowns. It isn't perfect and I'm tired of paying for it, but it helps.


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#85 RapunzelGnome

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 09:38 PM

Not to completely derail the thread to the modern medicene argument, but I think that being healers is one of those things that does connect us. I would never forgo modern medical treatment, but I'm going to use my own healing powers to help as much as I can as a compliment to what the doctors do.

I had a massive infection in my wisdom tooth last week. Massive. One of the most severe and unyielding pains I've ever experienced and it was preventing me from doing anything. I knew that one way or another that tooth needed to come out, but it was the most busy and important week of the year at my job so I needed to get through a few more days before having surgery. I had a friend perform Reiki on me, and the next morning, the swelling was down and the pain was manageable with just Advil (which hadn't put a dent in it before). Another day of reiki treatments and I was virtually pain free.

By the time I got to the dentist, the infection was almost completely gone, though the damage it left behind was visible on the X-rays. My dentist said she couldn't beleive I wasn't in more pain than I was so I told her that it had been HORRIBLE last week and then went away. I didn't mention the reiki, but she said it was unheard of for the pain to subside on its own like that. Now, I'm still gonna take the antibiotics she prescribed and get the tooth extracted on Tuesday (cuz reiki ain't gonna put a broken tooth back together) but you can bet your ass I'll have my crystals in my pocket that give me courage, and that I'll be back at my Friend's house for reiki treatments afterwards to make sure that everything heals up good.

So it's about finding a balance for me.. Solanacae is correct about the medical industry in many ways, so you've got to use it your advantage, while also being crafty about not letting yourself be manipulated by the system. Weed is more helpful for my migraines and anxiety than any medication I've ever taken but the alas, that options off the table if you want to stay legal. And it's much better to manage my menstrual cramps with my herbal teas and reiki than to take prescribed painkillers that are addicting and wreck havoc on your liver...but that's the only answer that the medical community offers for someone with severe cramps. Why take sleep aid narcotics when lavender in your pillow helps? But I still put neosporin on my cuts and go to doc when I'm sick. Being a witch just means that I am prepared to do my research to figure out if what they tell me is really the best thing for my body, or whether it's just the easiest thing for the doctor to get me through the system quickly without the insurence companies raping everyone in the meantime.

Above all, don't discount the power of your own healing energy, whether used in conjunction with modern medicene or with a more natural remedy. If that means using your prescription bottle as a spirit-rattle before taking your pills or setting up a crystal grid around your pepto-bismol bottle, or making sure you've got tea tree oil and stinging nettles always stocked in your first aid kit, then so be it. On the other hand, for another witch it may be as simple as listening deeply to your intuition to know when it's time to go to the doctor, and staying in tune to your body by eating healthy foods and caring for yourself regularly.

Edited by RapunzelGnome, 02 April 2016 - 09:46 PM.

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#86 Kalinia

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 12:06 AM

I haven't read through all of the replies yet, so I am going to just answer the main post. Great question btw!

 

I for one think that this can be a very lonely path, yet at times it can evolve into something where lonely is the last thing a person will feel. I am no where near an expert in this journey, or craft, but I feel like it is just something in each of us that we FEEL that others  are unable to feel. 

 

I feel connected where I am, but I often yearn for Oceans, Snowy Mountains, Tropical Islands, etc. Not for the vacation aspect, but to feel the energies of nature in the different environments. I do believe that they are different depending where you go. 

 

The biggest thing is that no matter where I am in life, or what I am doing, or how far "lost" I may seem, something always nudges me and reminds me of this inner journey that I belong on. Things may not be very clear, but they are there.

 

I feel at home when I am in a forest and can feel the energies of everything around me. Sometimes I have to really zone in on it, but its one of  the most amazing feelings in the entire world. I also am a home body. I make my house, my HOME.


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#87 Mistflower

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 11:20 AM

I have taken anti-depressants for a long time - I do not find they dull my senses;  they seem to put me at a "baseline" that I can work from. I have tried many times to reduce them - not a very high dose really - but without success. I  don't think I will try again for a long time. Last time I went for a "review" about my medication I got a different GP to the one I like to go to. She was very keen that I try to stop taking them. I won out  though, and got my prescription renewed (and reminded myself to go to my preferred GP next time). So, here was conventional medicine trying to encourage more "traditional" methods (albeit ones that do not work for me).

 

Having said that, I make my own lavender oil from my lovely lavender bushes; I use the dried flower heads in recipes; I make my own vanilla essence, and so on and so forth etc. etc.

 

One of my daughters is on a LOT of modern medication which is helping her - but she still needs her himalayan salt crystal light and incense.


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Quick, said the bird, find them, find them,
Round the corner. Through the first gate


The Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot

#88 Belle

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 08:40 PM

anti depressents are terrible to wean off. The side effects of lowering the dose, is worse then the cure. But if you can manage to do that then it is worth it in the end. Unless of course, you really need them...I took them years ago and it was a horrible experience, one I would never do again.  My husband at the time pressured me to go off of them, he said I wasn't the same. So I did, and I was much better after I stopped taking them. Another thing he was right about.  I personally never was tolerant of that kind of medication so it would be different for someone who was.  The main problem I had when I was taking them and during withdrawal is they made me stupid. I had to work during that time so I had to pretend to be on the ball when I didn't even know where the ball was.   If and when you do go off of them, wean very slowly.


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#89 Oroboros

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 03:58 AM

A few unrelated thoughts...

-I find it fascinating and kind of beautiful to see each new persons answer to the o.p.:).

-Phew, I could rant endlessly about how processing screws the hell out of really awesome natural ingredients, but it is also true that modern medicine is nothing short of miraculous...and horrific, a blessing, and a curse-you get the idea. However, overall, I'm sure glad we have it.

@Odalibuc - would you mind sharing what antidepressant doubles as an ADHD treatment as well? This sounds impressive. I know there are some newish antidepressants on the market, perhaps it is one of those? This is just curiosity, if you'd rather not say, that's perfectly ok too:).

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...From ev’ry depth of good and ill , The mystery which binds me still...— Poe

#90 Mistflower

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 10:36 AM

anti depressents are terrible to wean off. The side effects of lowering the dose, is worse then the cure. But if you can manage to do that then it is worth it in the end. Unless of course, you really need them...I took them years ago and it was a horrible experience, one I would never do again.  My husband at the time pressured me to go off of them, he said I wasn't the same. So I did, and I was much better after I stopped taking them. Another thing he was right about.  I personally never was tolerant of that kind of medication so it would be different for someone who was.  The main problem I had when I was taking them and during withdrawal is they made me stupid. I had to work during that time so I had to pretend to be on the ball when I didn't even know where the ball was.   If and when you do go off of them, wean very slowly.

---------------------------------

Yes I guess every time I was weaning myself off way too fast. I will try again some day, but I do tolerate the medication very well. I remember the very first time I started taking them the exact moment when they kicked in. I was with my daughter, the one I have mentioned, who at the time was about 2 or 3 years old, standing in our garden (we no longer live there) looking in the flower bed. All of a sudden I found I was in the moment and could just enjoy being with her, in a nice normal way, instead of my mind racing and spinning and worrying about next this happens, then this, then this, then this, then that... and then  we all die so what's the point of anything anyway!  :blink:

We are all different though and I certainly have heard of many people for whom they are just wrong.

 

@Kalinia - I'm a home body too. I have nature in my home and of course my garden - I do love to walk locally; I'm lucky to live near very ancient common land and National Trust Woods and parks. Perhaps I need to feel more of a connection there, just at the moment it is less personal. I guess we are all connected because we are all searching - something that's already been said, I know!

 

so... I have just this minute had an accidental call on my phone from someone - I think she sat on her phone or something because I could just hear that noise when someone's walking around outdoors. The thing is, it's a lady I met at the area I mentioned ^^^^ in the above paragraph, obviously out there right now walking her dogs. Now that to me is a message to get myself out there!


Edited by Mistflower, 04 April 2016 - 10:40 AM.

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Quick, said the bird, find them, find them,
Round the corner. Through the first gate


The Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot

#91 RoseRed

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 11:27 AM

Kiva Rose has some excellent write-ups on blog.  Perhaps, you can find something helpful there

http://bearmedicineh...ferentials.html


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#92 odalibuc

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 03:39 PM

@Oroboros sure, I'm not ashamed to be medicated. Its called Buproprion, and from what I can tell its a newer medication. Its primary use is in helping people with depression, especially people with the kind that I have where depressive episodes last literally years but aren't as bad as with major depression or bipolar disorder. From what my doctor told me, its helpfulness with ADHD was an unintended bonus. I was really lucky that the first medication I tried with my new doctor worked (I had been off antidepressants for about two years before going on a new medication); there are some really nasty side effects. The only one I experience is that I can get nauseous if I don't eat before I take it. And getting drunk when you're on it can mess you up, but I don't really drink so it isn't an issue for me.


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#93 Oroboros

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 02:42 AM

@Odalibuc-
Oh I think most people have been on antidepressants at one time or another, or will be, or should be;)... Just didn't know how personal or specific you wanted to be.
Bupropion, also known as Wellbutrin was- at one time at least marketed under the name Zyban for smoking cessation. It's been around more than 10 years for sure, but I don't know how much more.
I had no idea that it, or any antidepressant, was effective with ADHD though. I appreciate the info, as I know someone who may want to give that a try. Some people leave their adult ADHD untreated because the stimulant treatments are intolerable for them. However, I have taken Wellbutrin in the past myself with minimal side effects- so as far as psych meds go, seems like a decent drug. Seems like women -myself included- either gain weight and/or never want to have sex again on most SSRIs, but I think that one is not so bad in that respect- though I did not take it for very long and I'm sure the side effects vary greatly from person to person.

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...From ev’ry depth of good and ill , The mystery which binds me still...— Poe

#94 Mistflower

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 09:33 AM

Kiva Rose has some excellent write-ups on blog.  Perhaps, you can find something helpful there

http://bearmedicineh...ferentials.html

-------------------------------

 

This is interesting, RR   :)

 

I have of late been looking into inidvidual herb spirits. There are herbs I have always grown and loved and I am seeking more knowledge. At first glance the blog seems to have no connection with me due to its U.S. locale but digging only slightly deeper I see there is a wonderful piece about bioregional herbalism.


Edited by Mistflower, 05 April 2016 - 09:51 AM.

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Quick, said the bird, find them, find them,
Round the corner. Through the first gate


The Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot

#95 RoseRed

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 10:34 AM

She's out in the desert about 1,000 miles away from me.   She's all about the plants. 


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#96 Tricycle

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 04:48 AM

I wanted to comment on this post originally, and it's one that I've felt a need to talk about for a while. But, it's a touchy subject for me, so I took lots of time to think about this before answering.

 

I was born in Australia. I have English, Irish and Welsh ancestry. Some of that is convict blood, some is due to migration. I also am on a Druid path as well as a trad one, so to me, ancestral veneration is important. Living here, it's tricky. I feel a strong connection to this land (Australia), and yet I feel a pull toward the UK. I feel cut off from that.

 

Things that are tough to deal with: when I read things online (not here!) from trads in the UK, who say things like, 'Aussies and Americans with UK blood need to butt out of this; they don't know what they're doing and have no right to claim this path and it's insulting when they try'. I  don't find all trads feel that way, not at all. It's a kick in the guts when people do say these things though, because convicts did not choose to come here. They were sent here due to the overcrowded prisons, and many for crimes relating to poverty and starvation, such as stealing bread for their family. To be told that we should be excluded due to circumstances a few hundred years that were out of our control (and often out of our ancestors' control!) just makes things more painful and confusing.

 

Then: when I want to venerate the spirits and ancestors of my land: the Aboriginal people. Look at what us white folks did to them! I always fear a frosty reception if I were to approach an Aboriginal, asking for ways to venerate their ancestors. I fear that would be extremely offensive and painful for them to hear it, given their treatment by the whites over the past 200 years, right up to today.

 

The way I deal with it: I try to do my own research. I'm slowly learning the Welsh language (my father used to know some, because his grandfather taught him, but now my Dad's forgotten it all, and never remembered enough to teach us), to help me to feel connected in some way, also because the language is dying, and I'd like to help do my part to keep it alive. I also want to learn Irish, but it's much harder :D

 

I research what I can on the history of the countries of my ancestry, and the trad and spiritual practices of them.

 

And as for reaching out to people who could help with such things; I go where I'm welcomed. Here is one fantastic place :) I reach out to people of the Aboriginal culture who make their culture and spirituality accessible to whites or anyone else. I'm always open to hearing about how others deal with it, too. For me, the hardest part is feeling as though my ancestors have been plonked into the wrong spot on the planet, and now feeling as though, whichever way I turn, I risk stepping on toes. It's also confusing trying to follow Celtic culture when our seasons are the total opposite at all times! :D That's what I'd love to hear from other Aussies about: how do you handle that?


Edited by Tricycle, 18 July 2017 - 04:51 AM.

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