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Grimalkin

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I was told Warlock means 'oathbreaker'... other than that, when I hear both words I think of Merlin/Harry Potter and other Buffy kind of stuff..

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Tell me what you think of the terms Wizard and Worlock?:thinking:

The word Wizard to me first makes me think of old time words along with sorcerer. Someone who worked on and with spells, was into control and power, was also into Alchemy possible. Maybe they had a place on the Kings payroll?

 

A Warlock, Bewitched, Dungeons & Dragons, a male witch, and oath breaker. Both words go back much farther than Harry Potter, LOL

 

I am not sure if these words are made up in our time like some suggest. We today down play these words to be nothing, just ways to describe someone in old Fairytale's. But maybe they were real words, because all though the time of the stories and I before, people knew what these words meant, so if they weren't used at sometime why use them to describe something that never was and just use the word Witch? (Don't know if that made sense)

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Guest Oakbuchanan
Tell me what you think of the terms Wizard and Worlock?:thinking:

 

...They are both very masculine terms..

Ambers right with the meaning...

Dont know why but If someone said to me "Im a Wizard!" it would make me cringe abit..probably in the same way some people cringe when someone proclaims they are a witch! I dunno it seems a bit more fantasy, gamer, D&Dish...

Are there Female Wizards?...One of my nicknames when i was a teenager was Warlock, lol...Other than that not much..

 

Why dyou ask? and what dyou think about the terms Grim?

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Tell me what you think of the terms Wizard and Worlock?:thinking:

 

They really have little relevance to me personally. Warlock is flat out pejorative. Wizard might be more reclaimable; but then you've the whole Potter phenom and fantasy thing. It would drive anyone nutz to constantly have to deal with the reactions to that I'd think.

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You mean Warlock? Yes, there's the "Oath Breaker" connotation, but that etymology has some wiggle room I believe - it's mostly the wiccan's who shun the term, and it's still possible that it means something other than "Oath Breaker". It sort of depends on which language or culture you're looking back to, Germanic? Gaelic? Old Norse? There are often similar sounding or spelled words that mean different things.

 

Growing up, I used to think of "Merlin" when I heard the word, "Wizard", as well as that silly pointed hat with stars and moons painted on it, which became something of a joke, and then later on, Harry Potter and Dumbledore (and even Gandalf the Grey), which seemed to give the image more respect in popular culture. Wizard means, literally, "Wise One" (Wyse = Wise, or Wyse-ard), and comes from Middle English, circa 1400-1450.

 

After learning this, I'd have no image issues calling myself a Wizard these days. :naughty: I've gained new respect for the word and the image it conveys. And though, I think "Warlock" sounds even a bit ... ermm... "cooler", and I might use that if I can find better evidence against the "oath-breaker" etymology; otherwise, I probably won't, as Satanists have grown found of using the title for shock value.

 

I have to admit, and maybe this is what Grimalkin is really trying to get at here - that I'm not entirely comfortable using the term "witch". I just cannot shake the (modern) feminine connotation of the word, even though it doesn't denote gender one way or the other, etymologically speaking.

 

On a related note, I've read of conflicting reports of the etymology of Witch/wicce/wicca/witka, too. Some claim it too means "wise one" but I believe this is incorrect, another wiccan slant: wicce meant to bend or twist, and shares a similar origin to "wicker". If you look at a witch as someone who can "bend" or "twist" will, reality, fate or wyrd to their desire, then this makes perfect sense.

 

Edit: I just found a cool bit of text on the etymologies of witch and wizard, on google books:

http://books.google.com/books?id=_m7k1Oi-cakC&pg=PA218&lpg=PA218&dq=wizard++etymology&source=bl&ots=eua7xENu1k&sig=uFCJcKoE6-3pni75xbMOQ4kI9DE&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=13&ct=result

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I've never researched the terms, but here is my personal perceptions of the terms.

Warlock to me is an oath breaker, a not-so-nice person, or one who breaks away from their original group and turns on them. All the warlocks I encountered as a child (fairy tales, etc.) were on the wrong side of people. My perception hasn't changed with age.

For me, wizard conjures images of Gandalf, Merlin and others, sans pointy hat :naughty:. Though I tend to associate the title with those using high, or ceremonial magic and/or alchemy; those who seek to transform (Merlin transformed himself and tried to transform the young boy Arthur into a worthy King in the tales I knew as a child).

Both terms, to me, are masculine, though I have heard warlock being used to describe women.

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Classic-Wizard will always be Merlin to me and Warlock has got to be the smooth father of Samantha. This is what just pops into my head with these words.

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I have not really researched either. But had always heard that warlock was oathbreaker. And yes, it was pretty much from wiccans that I got this information. So, I do not know for sure what the word originated from or for. Wizard, to me is a wise scientist who uses alchemy and magic. Not following a religion of any sort.

Rebie

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I agree that for me, warlock connotes an oath-breaker or a "black magic" kinda guy. In other words, a "bad guy" (yup, gender-specific). Wizard brings to mind Merlin, Gandalf and now, Dumbledore with pointy hat, robe with arcane symbols and the obligatory wand. Still gender-specific.

 

On the other hand, I use the term "witch" to describe any practitioner of magic, whether male or female, folk or ceremonial. I would use the term "magical practitioner" but a) that's a mouthful and b) seems to come out as someone who does sleight-of-hand or some of the more grandiose versions of it.

 

So, Grym, from me, you must be in touch with your "female side" ... :grin_witch:

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Yup....when I hear the word "wizard", I definitely think of the pointy hat Merlin type as well. Someone who is into his craft for the good of mankind. Now, when I hear the term "warlock", I think of an evil magician type such as the villian on Halloweentown (a kiddie show on disney..but I still love it! ):)

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I never gave either one much thought. But doing so right now...

Wizard - I agree with the others...Kind of cool in the 'Harry Potter' way.

Warlock - gives me the creeps fro reasons I can't really place at the moment. Probably something do do with upbringing, or Hollywod, or something.

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Wizard - just makes me think of Merlin or Harry Potter

 

Warlock - makes me think of all those 'evil' sorcerer men in television or movies, like cartoons etc.

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An old thread on Warlock might be interesting to those of you pondering the terms.

http://www.traditionalwitch.net/forums/showthread.php?t=501&highlight=warlock

 

I sympathise with you chaps, over the cultural associations with the term Witch being largely stereotypically feminine. Maybe Wizard is the way to go, although there are yet more cultural associations there! For those of you who want to be bad boys, I would go for Warlock!:banana:

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Tana, couldn't find it ... did MoorDragon ever post his research (or maybe get his book published)?

 

I almost forgot one of the more current "wizards". That'd be Harry Dresden and his ilk.

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Never given either much thought but this question came up on another site that I frequent and the answers were simlar. Wizard tends bring thoughts of Merlin etc and Warlock images of an evil doer, cartoony type!

 

Mind you all these terms are relative....I can't say I'm that struck on 'Witch' either, but there you go..... it's all down to personal preference.

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Bit different for me (is it a welsh thing?) When I hear the word Wizard I think of an older, wise, magical man. No pointy hats etc.

There was a couple of what I would have called "Dewin" where I grew up. I suppose they would have been the male equivalent of witches but back then we would not have called them "Gwrach" (witch) so they would have been known as Dewin.(wizard)

The one guy lived in a cottage far away from everyone and was an amazing healer, you would see him roaming the hillsides before the morning dew had left the grass, gathering his ingredients. He took my Brother under his wing and taught him a lot about plants and wild herbs.

According to my Brother he saw this man ridding people of skin cancers which never returned.

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Whenever I think of Warlock i think of two things...the b grade Horror film series ( oh gods that was bad) and teenage satanists ( there was a group in Tassie once upon a time that were going around calling themselves satanic warlock...in which i couldnt stop laughing).

 

Wizards Ive always seen as Merlin-esque men. However saying that My old teacher always referred to himslef as a wizard, and a powerful wizard he was too!

 

I've always seen wizards as sort of the male equiv. of Witches, but that again is from my point of view, and also based on how a lot of my male spiritual friends referring themselves to this term. They practice the same way I do, but just prefer the term, over witch.

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