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A Witch Alone/Marian Green


Morgana

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Has any one read this book? I just received it. I ordered it cuz it looked interesting but now that I have it, I think its more Wiccan. The correct tital is A Witch Alone, Thirteen Moons to master natural magic, a practical handbook.

 

Oh hell I may just read it S&G's!!!

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Has any one read this book? I just received it. I ordered it cuz it looked interesting but now that I have it, I think its more Wiccan. The correct tital is A Witch Alone, Thirteen Moons to master natural magic, a practical handbook.

 

Oh hell I may just read it S&G's!!!

 

I've seen it before and scanned through it...it is terribly wiccan so I left it where it was...on the bookshelf LOL!

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Thirteen Moons to master natural magic, a practical handbook

 

This right here is your give away!

 

There is no such animal, although tempting, ahhhhhh, but wishful, not to my knowledge.

 

I'm sorry, I meant no disrespect!!!! I only meant in the future!!

 

I should have been more specific. I myself have made the mistake on a number of occasions only to be disappointed..........

 

If they are indeed out there, I have yet to find them and I'm always looking :)

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Sweetie, no disrespect taken,,,,,my statement was just that!! I just don't read throughly sometimes and I end up getting goofy things!!!! Besides, its hard to insult me!!!! Once you've been here awhile, you'll know everyone and what they can take!!!

 

Just someone next time tell me WHAT NOT TO BUY!!!!!!! LOL:hugs:

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Yeah....I'm not real bright sometimes!! Oh well, I'll have my FDIL dump it on ebay for me. :mad2::rofl:

 

Well thats what I did with my books like that, that I sold to that book store. If its too wiccan for me I just get rid of it, and someone who is into it can use it. We all make these mistakes, (I've made my fill, LOL) so hard to find good books, specially if ordering off the internet.

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A witch alone takes the fluffyness out of what we would call wicca(note the lower case w). It takes "solitary religious witchcraft" back to the bare bones, casts of the glitter and glam and takes you through a more natural path, different to ours but more similar than real Wicca (which i believe is a coven based, lineaged, fertility and mystery religion and nothing else :mad2: which I respect as a genuine path, and am sure real Wiccans roll their eyes at what wicca has become).

It tells you to go out side use your intuition, use natures own tools. I dont think it has the witches creed or the threefold law in it but it doesn't promote the whole of witchcraft as we traditional witches believe i.e the darker side of witchcraft which makes the whole.

Not what we witches see as witchcraft but one of the better 'how to' books (and there are not many). Marian Green is one of the more respected modern 'witchcraft' authors who has been practising her type of witchcraft for over 40 years and is a million miles away from the new age, mix it all together, add some fairy dust and pink angel wings brand that makes me want to put a bullet through my head.

As I say its not My type of witchcraft but its one I would recommend to anyone asking about a solitary wiccan type path.

 

Ooh look at Spinney being all sweetness and light

Edited by spinneyhex
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Its been said before but I don't mind repeating it......don't beat yourself up because you bought a book that has wiccan content....if you bought it because you were drawn to it then read it! There are plenty books out there claiming to be about trad craft or any other craft, that are a load of crap. You will find plenty of bits and bobs in Marianne Greenes books to pick out and use, as you will with lots of other books.

 

It's all down to personal taste as well. Just because someone read a certain book and liked it doesn't mean you will too. We are a diverse bunch of people with very different tastes, that's what makes it interesting.

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Guest Oakbuchanan
Has any one read this book? I just received it. I ordered it cuz it looked interesting but now that I have it, I think its more Wiccan. The correct tital is A Witch Alone, Thirteen Moons to master natural magic, a practical handbook.

 

Oh hell I may just read it S&G's!!!

 

I had the pleasure of meetin Marian Green recently. She is a Pagan.. a reconstructionalist..and that comes out in her books.. me and a friend were havin lunch with her in the park and got around to askin how she started on this path..She told us she grew up on a farm, where folk magic and relationship with nature was as normal as breathing..she was exposed to to folk magic all life.

She said one day she had watched her father cure a sick cow by circling it 3 times and mumbling something..

 

She is traditional in terms that she is teachin the path of the wise woman or cunning man so shes definatley promoting a pre wiccan witchcraft..

 

I think she mentions in the book that theres nothing to stop a Christian being a Witch.. So she is seperating Witchcraft and religion, which Wicca dosent.

 

Although she is promoting Paganism, not wicca exactly(although some of the book would appeal to the wiccan mindset).

 

She told us that she was introduced cermonial magick when she lived in London through collegues whom she worked with at the British library..

So she does practise both High and low magic..She also is a big fan of Dion Fortune.. who I must admit I have lot of respect for.. The whole 'magical battle of Britain' thing fascinates me..

 

I sure dont agree with everything in this book, but overall I think its a world above some of the begginer crap out there.. and I think it may act as a bridge from the Wicca wonderland to the gritty world of real Witchcraft! :)

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Although she is promoting Paganism, not wicca exactly(although some of the book would appeal to the wiccan mindset).

 

I think the big problem that we have is that Paganism and wicca are being promoted as the same thing, you see it in bookshops, books, magazines and grr most websites. It irritates me more than anything, wicca may be a Pagan religion but its one of many.

When I tell people im Pagan they think I mean wiccan.

Its this that confuses many newbies or pushes them blindly into the realms of "eclectic wicca".

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I'll have to stand up for Marian a bit here as it was this book which started me off on a more traditional path. Yes, there are bits in it which could be construed as "Wiccanish" but for the most part, it has a lot more depth than most books available for the beginner. I therefore agree with Oakbuchanan - its a good bridge between Wicca and more tradiitional paths

 

SB

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I have encountered the "you must be wiccan" response when I have stated that I was pagan, Spinney, and like you it irritated me no end. I own that book and others by Marianne Green, I might not have read them for a while but to be honest the only thing I have read that's got anything to do with witchcraft lately, is the Pickwick Papers, which I go back to and re-read often....

 

It's a bit like having children with autism....in the early days you read everything that comes your way, you search out and read everything recommended. After a few years you realise that most books have little new to offer so you don't bother, until, something new, innovative or just a damn good read comes on the market or someone tells you about.

 

Here in Scotland, especially in the north, pagan is acceptable, just... wiccan is totally misunderstood, witchcraft is not acceptable in any form and little is known about any other type of craft.

Edited by LadyHawk
forgot to put the word lately in
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There are so many books out there, some wiccan, some not. It's to the point I buy a book and get maybe one paragraph's information out of it and disregard the rest. But that one paragraph may be worth the price of the book. Then I dump it either at a used book store in Atlanta (NOT up here!) or on Ebay to get a wee bit of my money back.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Oakbuchanan
I'm so glad I read this thread. This book is on my Amazon Wishlist as I thought it was more for the Witch and not so Wiccan. Oh well, just goes to show :rolleyes_witch:

 

I wouldn't completely write it off though until you have actually read it :)

even if its just sat in Borders or Waterstones for a couple of hours..

 

Id say if anything it challenges Wiccan dogma..

 

Out of interest, why was this book on your wishlist in the first place?

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I wouldn't completely write it off though until you have actually read it :)

even if its just sat in Borders or Waterstones for a couple of hours..

 

Id say if anything it challenges Wiccan dogma..

 

Out of interest, why was this book on your wishlist in the first place?

 

Basically because I was browsing Amazon one day and came across it and the title of the book grabbed me.

 

I've heard mixed reviews about it now. You're probably right, I should have a quick flick of it first ;)

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I decided after reading the posts, I'm going to give it a try and see what happens. I have to finish The Real Middle Earth first, which I am throughly enjoying!!

 

I've also picked up some more books by Dorothy Morrison. Yes I know she is a High Wiccan Priestess, but I just love the way she rights. When I get thru those, I'll post about them!!

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  • 11 months later...

After perusing the discussion here, I felt that I should read this book. I have recently finished it and am browsing through it a second time.

 

The book is presented as a teaching tool and a guide for people who wish to develop their own path outside of a coven or other group. Each chapter contains a discussion, a section of 'exercises", and a handful of "further reading" references.

 

The idea is to read the chapter and spend time thinking about the discussion and completing the exercises for a compete lunar cycle before moving on to the next chapter. It seemed to me to be very much focused on helping newcomers get comfortable with some of the more common concepts one finds in pagan and witchcraft practices without overwhelming them with too much instruction. it's a "think for yourself' kind of thing.

 

As has been mentioned in this thread, the author is a pagan and the book includes exercises and discussions that reflect this. However, it is not the entirety of the book, nor do I really feel that it is the chief focus of it. There are well-presented topics such as the festivals of the year, trance and meditation techniques, connecting with nature and the past, healing, divination, and wortcunning. All with further reading references so the reader is not left hanging unless she chooses to be. The focus very much is on being out in nature and coming to understand it deeply.

 

Each chapter is presented in a very generic fashion. She never tells you anything in a pedantic "you must do this" sort of way. It's very much "investigate and find out what suits you", and I think that for people who are unsure of what they are looking for, it is a good approach. There are so many authors who are happy to tell their readers what to do and think, that I found this refreshing. She does refer to some of her other books which, I believe, offer a more definitive direction if one is looking for that. (I have not read them, and have no current desire to do so.)

 

She urges her readers to investigate things, to go to libraries and read about folkloric traditions and ancient farming practices, amongst other things. She sounds well read and deeply interested in her topic.

 

I think it is a very 'nice' book. And I mean that in the sideways way that it sounds. It IS nice, it's friendly and it is also very well presented and written. This person obviously knows her stuff. As has also been mentioned in this thread, there is no discussion of the "darker" aspects of this craft. Disappointing, yes, but not really surprising to be perfectly honest, is it?

 

This book made me think about things from a different perspective and I appreciate that. I'm not too sure what I will have taken away from reading "A Witch Alone" but I'm sure it'll pop up eventually. As it always does.

 

:sunny:

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I have read this book. It was one of the first I read when starting my path. Even though there were a lot of things that were referenced to wicca there were also a lot of things I found to be more traditional. As we have always learned throughout our lives, keep an open mind, what you like take what you, and what you don't leave behind. I found some very interesting things in her book, things I remember to this day and then there are things that did not pertain to me and I can hardly tell you what they are. The things that make no sence to me I leave behind and never return to it in my head again. Read the book, take what you like and leave what you don't. We always find little bits of traditional witchcraft in everything and everyone around us, just look for what you know to be true to you.:cauldron:

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This is a book I also read a few years ago. I would have to agree with those who sort of describe it as a bridge from "wicca" to a more trad. path. I liked it enough to put it on the "keep" book shelf. My revisit it this winter and see if I still want to keep it around.

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I too have a copy of this book and I enjoyed the read. Some of the ideas were useful, and continue to be, some were not. While I wouldn't say "You MUST go out and get this book", it is one that I wouldn't advise people not to look at, and I have to say that I for one am not in a hurry to oust it from it's place in my bookshelf.

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