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Robin Artisson


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#1 RavenFlyer

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 06:54 PM

Okay. So being that I did not know anything about him before two years ago I do feel that I have missed a lot.
I know there are some people that hate him vehemently. And others love him. And of course there are those that are going to say Who the Hell is He?
I can only say one thing. I don't know to all three prior statements. I found his book The Witching Way of Hollow Hill a few years ago and the description seemed really great and really iinteresting. So what I normally do before I buy from someone I know nothing about I do a google search and see what I can find.
Well I found a few people praising him, and I found a loud group wishing him a fiery death after he literally swallows his computer and all his witch paraphenilia. Its iinteresting to me how one man can have such differing opinions of him.

I have not read his book. I did order it yesterday, and I decided to form my own opinion about him. As I have always said when asked abuot him previously I said I don't know. I have never spoken with this man, or even read his writings. So I never had an opinion.
But I guess why I am moving this rambling train down the track is to see what you all have to say about this man.
Do you love him? hate him?
disagree with him? agree with him?
and most importantly why do you feel that way?

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#2 Ancestral Celt

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 07:04 PM

There are already a few threads in which RA is mentioned, such as:

Robin Artisson; and
TW Authors and Books. ;)

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#3 RavenFlyer

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 07:16 PM

whoopsie.

sorry! thanks for the links.

This thread can be closed/locked/deleted. Or left open whatever you wonderful gracious mods would like to do with it.

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#4 Ancestral Celt

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 07:20 PM

Ravenflyer,

If you do a search for his name at these message boards, he's mentioned a few times, but you may have to trawl through some long threads. ;)

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#5 Michele

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 08:28 PM

I don't agree with everything he says, but I have very much enjoyed some of his essays - especially the "Faerie - The Awe of the Unseen and the Unknown" and the "Key to Understanding Trance Induction or Shamanic Cognition". Also the "Fire Brand and the Silver Thread" was very good. They were all philosophical in nature, and the shamanic one had some very good suggestions to be derived from it (I thought). He also wrote one about "Traditional Witch Wars" which was good I think - I know I read it twice so I must have found something in it... LOL, actually I have yet to find anyone I totally agree with, or anyone I totally disagree with. But I have definiately enjoyed some of his essays - I take what makes sense to me and leave what doesn't :-)
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#6 Ancestral Celt

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 02:57 PM

Varillon's Recent Revelation thread also has some information on RA.
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#7 AnjelWolf

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 03:09 PM

Okay. So being that I did not know anything about him before two years ago I do feel that I have missed a lot.
I know there are some people that hate him vehemently. And others love him. And of course there are those that are going to say Who the Hell is He?
I can only say one thing. I don't know to all three prior statements. I found his book The Witching Way of Hollow Hill a few years ago and the description seemed really great and really iinteresting. So what I normally do before I buy from someone I know nothing about I do a google search and see what I can find.
Well I found a few people praising him, and I found a loud group wishing him a fiery death after he literally swallows his computer and all his witch paraphenilia. Its iinteresting to me how one man can have such differing opinions of him.

I have not read his book. I did order it yesterday, and I decided to form my own opinion about him. As I have always said when asked abuot him previously I said I don't know. I have never spoken with this man, or even read his writings. So I never had an opinion.
But I guess why I am moving this rambling train down the track is to see what you all have to say about this man.
Do you love him? hate him?
disagree with him? agree with him?
and most importantly why do you feel that way?




I gotta be honest with everyone here I had never heard of this guy...but I will research his name and see what he is about LOL!

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#8 Tana

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 05:01 PM

He is a very contraversial figure! I have seen articles and posts from either his supporters or detractors on various sites on the net. One thing that struck me was the absolute filfth that has been posted against him by one of his detractors, who obviously feels very strongly against him. Not sure that is the best way of garnering support for an argument because it made me sympathetic to RA!

On reading his bits and pieces on the net, I think he is probably a typical author who converts to TW and then gets caught up in the 'authenticity' Witch wars. Haven't read any of his books.

)0( Tana )o(

If I break faith with thee, may the skies fall upon me, the seas drown me, and the earth rise up and swallow me.

#9 LadyHawk

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 05:47 PM

I like some of his stuff and I feel he has been maligned just a bit. As Michele said, you rarely find an author that you can agree with 100%....but he's worth a look
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LadyHawk x

#10 Heathen1

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 01:31 AM

I haven't read his books... I am rather afraid. But I have had a personal run in with the man and I hope I never do again! Not that he did anything to me, sometimes it's just better if the Great People don't know you exist. I keep meaning to read his books, but his controversy just appalls me, I just don't see the need for it. I can't access the links in this thread as I am not a member yet, so I can't post this in a more appropriate place.
I hope that someone would post a good review. I have read short works and found that I've read that information before, but I guess that's explained by the fact that I've been On The Path twice as long as RA.
He writes well though.

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#11 Michele

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Posted 29 September 2008 - 11:43 AM

I don't know if this will post or not, but I tried to "paste" in one of his articles that I had found interesting. It is one way of looking at something:

* * *


"They laugh and are glad and are terrible:
When their lances shake, every green reed quivers.
How beautiful they are
How beautiful the lordly ones
In the hollow hills."

- Fiona Macleod





There is an Unseen World

There is an unseen world that haunts mankind. It's always been here; it will always be here. I've experienced its edges and corners and one of its deep wells, and to this day, I don't really know what it is. I call it a "world unseen", just as others have, and for you, this may call to mind ideas of an "otherworld", or a faerie world, a spirit world, some unseen dimension, some heaven, some hell, some pocket reality, some precious mystery, some mystical place.

All of these terms are fine and all of these terms are failures, really, because they are all just words. I call it a "world" because many others have said it, but it was no world that I read about in books on folklore or mythology, and certainly not a "world" that I experienced. There is an extra-ordinary layer of human experience (or perhaps "just experience") that we have access to, or maybe I should say "has access to us"- but all of my thoughts about it, all of my hopes and dreams about it, my beliefs- they are really just guesses and fears. I think back to my times in this "otherworld" and I can't put two and two together. I didn't even have "times" there- Just tastes of something strange and impossible to explain to my satisfaction. I don't know what happened.



Dust from Dangerous Doors

Posted ImageHuman beings haven't stopped talking about the unseen world, since their first days. We've always known (or hoped, or dreaded) that our range of experience is broader than what we normally imagine, and we've lived in awe of the few times that we've experienced the wonder of that "greater glimpse" of the unseen. Whatever we "saw over there", I know it can be thought of as quite distinct from us- but is it? What if "over there" was "in here" too? I've long discussed the need to drop our absurd and habitual mental labels, divisions, and lines if we wish to engage the mystical vision, and I stand by that to this day- there is a clean and pure experience of wonder, of "otherness" that is possible to us if we allow ourselves to be free of our "wall building" habits. But is it always a good idea?

I must say, it is not. Years ago, I was a psychic voyeur of types; the thrill of the vision was my joyride. I reasoned to myself that visionary states, of the type that I could invoke using various mystical techniques, were perfectly natural and normal, and thus, (my reasoning ran further) they had some role in human spiritual development. If there were otherworlds, and if sentient beings inhabited them, then the capacity held by each human to experience those things was something we should be developing.

I know that I was wrong to think in this manner. While I still believe "sight" and "trance vision" to be perfectly natural to human beings, I no longer burden myself with the naive notion that all things natural to humankind are desirable or even necessary. That may sound like a scandalous thing to say, and this statement certainly doesn't extend to those natural aspects of humanity that have been excoriated by mainstream religions, such as sexuality and the like; no, I'm referring to the natural capacities of human beings to experience reality in a greater sense than we normally do.

How in the world could something as basic and simple as "experience" be a problem? I hope that my words will reach the eyes and ears of understanding, for what I am about to say, I wish I had said before, long ago. Our range of experience defines us- it creates all of our memories, builds our personalities, and sets us within the limits defined as "sane" by our societies. The artistic and the poetic- those most precious pylons of creativity that alone have led people for ages into ranges of experience that they could not have reached on their own- these things are the children of the "extranormal" investigation and exercise of experience. We all sense the value of poetry and art because we know that they are emissaries from something greater.

The poet or poetess, like the artist of the sacred, opens themselves to the dangerous reaches of the unseen, and as the story of the Leannan Sidhe tells us, they sometimes pay a price for their Dionysian ecstasies. Even those artists of the tame and the lame- those who, in age past, have labored away at dreary and linear tasks and created representations lacking the fire of real creativity- even those artists, on some level, were sweeping the dust from dangerous doors.



Faery Struck

Posted ImageOpening up to a single glimpse of something that one's mind cannot cope with or integrate can be devastating, or deadly. The death-blow may come as shock or fear, or (worse) as madness. The "fairy struck" of folklore, and the "fairy led"- there is no return for these poor souls. What would they return to? The world that they left, which is not there for them anymore: the world of men and women, bakers and milkmaids, cows and horses, cars and factories, roads and parks.

When you've seen the Otherness, felt its power, there is a forever alien disturbance hanging over these things- How simple it would be if there were just a park, just an oak tree, just a park-bench! Just a calm and happy world with marketplaces and gas-stations and shopping malls- but this is all ephemeral- all of our times, places, and lives- all of these things are small, flaming pieces of refuse inside of a boundless darkness that is more vast than we can imagine, and the slightest hint of its vastness doesn't look or sound like anything- it only feels like something: it feels like nausea.

There is something literally beyond belief "hanging over" everything we think we know- at once mystical and menacing- you might call it the "sacred presence of the otherworld", but those words are (in one respect) very deceitful- they seem positioned to take away the dread of it all. We forget this today, but What is sacred can be very frightening.

The park and the sunlit avenue, and the shopping mall- if that is all your range of experience lets you see, count yourself lucky. There is more happening here. I have no doubt that dying out of this range of experience that we call “this world” means continuing on in another one, and perhaps those dead people have a different time of it- but for we people here and now who open the "other" eyes, there is a phantasmagoria there, a bizarre glamour that harms as much as it helps.

It helped me to have faith in what most people could not see, but it has harmed me in ways- I fear sometimes that my own grip on things may be further gone than even I realize, and I wonder (sometimes) if I'm a spiritual danger to those around me. This simple paranoia is born in an easy-to-understand place: I know that I've encountered otherworldly powers and sentient beings. Once you see them, and they see you, a channel of communication is open, maybe for a long time, maybe forever. I hadn't thought about that when I was a younger man. I wish I had.



Dread, Awe, and Sanity

Posted ImageOur ancestors lived in dread and awe of the Otherworld. The new-age world, with all its flaky bullcockery regarding things "fairy" and "otherworldly" has taken our attention off of the most vital of facts- that our ancestors regarded the unseen with fears and terrors, as well as with (sometimes) wonders. How can we read all these fairy stories and folklore and see the dangers of the Faerie world, and not understand that "Fairie" is no just an idle name for an idyllic afterlife, or a childish world of wonder? What about the dark tale of Selena Moor? What about Thomas the Rhymer?

Our ancestors, up into the last few centuries, ran face to face with a terrible and majestic reality which is just out of our sight, but which is real- and they had no illusions about it. Today, wiccans and new-agers go for sport on Beltaine nights and Samhain nights to old Faery-mounds in Britain and Ireland, without often considering that wise Pagan ancestors- not just superstitious and afraid Christian ancestors- both would have advised against doing so. Why?

Because an extra-ordinary mystery can crack open on those nights and at those places, and it can steal a person's soul- and their mind. As I have said before, but never with enough strength or force, real spirituality dealing with the otherworld is serious; it is not for play; it has dangers. I wonder if I would have written some of the things I did write, and made so available, if I had really thought this through years ago.

Sanity is an issue. We love to laugh at how over-rated sanity is, and it is the done-to-death style of the young and the rebellious who wish to break the boundaries set down for them by their elders to "question everything" including what we call "normal and sane", but let me tell you- it is not overrated.

It is precious and valuable, and this world needs it. It's not a joke to have your mind's boundaries so violated by novel experiences- especially experiences so far out of the range of "normalcy" that they must be called "otherworldly"- such that one's mind can never again settle comfortably within one's own world of birth. Kids sitting around playing "crazy" and enjoying reputations for being "crazy" or "insane" aren't being cute; if they had to actually work or live around truly mentally ill people, they'd sober right up, let me assure you!

Few things are as devastating or dangerous as mental illness, and our minds aren't as strong as we'd imagine them to be, or like them to be. A peek down the wrong rabbit hole can inspire a lifelong curse of fear or confusion.



The Tinsel-Winged Horror

Posted ImageWhat could be more infuriating than the modern hordes of kids who play with their tinsel-winged fairies? From girls running to and fro with cute little butterfly wings on, spreading clouds of glitter, to neo-pagans "visualizing" faeries as little tinkerbells and cute, cuddly "elementals" who serve their pink pentagram goddess, the world has gone mad with regard to the truths about the Faery-world. Thank the Victorian-age artist/pedophiles who gave us the toothless and lame (yet enduring) vision of the tiny fairy with butterfly wings. Thank them and then remember to spit on their graves if you ever pass by one.

These modern kids (and sadly, adults), especially those who fool themselves into thinking that they are performing "spiritual" or "magical" acts that overlap with the faerie-reality- are recklessly creating the conditions for terror and madness, and grinning the entire time. They are dishonoring a real tradition that never, ever, made faeries into playthings and cutesy little goth-gowned sprites, nor things to be playfully and regularly invoked for any purpose.

The only thing that I believe protects this mass of unfortunates is the fact of their sheer foolishness and lack of seriousness- this sort of nonsense must keep them safely from the truth about Faerie or its many hidden entrances, in such a manner that their minds can never engage the darkness beneath. Perhaps the unseen powers have a bit of mercy on this point, and disregard this crowd of blithering idiots; I hope so. The "goth" fairy-sector may be just as ridiculous, but at least they are one degree closer to the truth- skulls, corpse-white skin, and faeries do genuinely go together, and have a traditional connection that goes back to the first graves of this world.

As for the rest, I hear people talk about "dark fairy tales", as though there were any other kind! I may sound a bit harsh, but these are matters of substance and importance- and the kindness of the wise is the cruelty of the foolish. The other day, a friend of mine pointed out that some new-age catalogue that showed up at his house was selling "Fairy Doors" for people's homes. I understand that sometimes, a piece of home decor is just a piece of decor, but really, I had to laugh and then cry.



The Green Throng of Vision-Daimons

Posted ImageMaturity has everything to do with controlling our range of experience- policing those ranges on our own. I once opened myself up to terrifying and strange things in the unseen world, and I did it simply because I could- I was intoxicated on the ability that my fetch gave me to have visionary experiences. I lucked out, and was able to return to this life after three full days of being captive in a frightening place- but to this day, much of that experience is not something I enjoy thinking about.

It isn't enough to seek out "otherworldly" experiences "because we can" or because it's new, unique, or just a curiosity. I know the seduction is there, but it is the same seduction that leads to hallucinogen use, like mushrooms or LSD- and goodness knows that those things can be damaging to the sanity (though they are, I think, less damaging than the power of the Otherworld).

The "psychedelic" consciousness-trippers are a good example of people who use chemicals to gain just a taste of the unseen world's great infinity and depth. These people do it largely for amusement, or for whatever "scientific" or "spiritual" justifications they invent to sooth their consciences. They all find the same thing- there is something delirious and mind-blowing just on the other side of perception, though their drugs only get them to the outermost regions of it all.

No matter how great the peyote was, the LSD, the lysergic acid, the morning glory, the psilocybin, the datura, it's all the same thing- weeds on the roadside, shite buttons in the pasture. It doesn't begin to drag a person into the true heart of darkness that hangs like the void of space over all things. The vision-teaching Daimons that appear to us as these various sacred plants are deceitful, and they've had to become so, considering how abused they are today by the fools of this world.

To go into the tangled green and lose one's senses is to make oneself available to be devoured by the inhabitants of that spirit-wild. This is the danger of the "entheogen" path; this is the danger that people refuse to see because they want, so dearly, for there to be an easy path to the beatific vision of truth. There is no easy path. You've heard it before, and it was true then, just as it is now. The green throng helped our ancestors in times distant, but in most cases, we've lost the wisdom to deal with them; we've become food for them now. Not everything in the natural world is peaceful and safe; like with the Otherworld, the forest and fields have their own dangers.



The Hidden Queen is in Her Court

Posted ImageFaerie-Elfhame is a place of great wonder and great beauty, and great danger and fear. I can't say this enough: A hidden Queen is in her Court, surrounded by her lords and knights, and by the throngs of the dead, some of whom hold on desperately to the idea that they are still alive. I have given keys to Her doors in some of my works, and now, for the sake of decency, I must warn those who use my works that they cannot tread with carelessness on the hidden roads that lead to these deeper places.

People to whom I have spoken about this accused me of trying to frighten them. I told them that if they weren't frightened at least a bit, they needed to get that way. Fear is part of respect when it comes to the Otherworld, and especially to that pale strand of the Otherworld that encloses the world's dead. The dead are taken by death, and they are compelled by the power of Fate into certain transformations, changes that occur in accord with their own natures and with deeper mysteries that cannot be fathomed. The death-metamorphosis is not kindly to some, and many don't even realize what is happening to them. They become the faces of the Otherworld that can terrify or illuminate those who glimpse them- but no matter what we see or what we feel when we catch a blessed/cursed glimpse beyond the green curtain, we are all looking at our own destinies. We are all waiting for our turn to take the ghost-roads and we are all due to enter into the surreal realm of illusions, self-knowledge, and consequence, one day.

I might say that we're already there; this world has more than it's share of illusions, opportunities for self-knowledge, and consequences. But this world affords us the possibility of spiritual laziness and physical over-indulgence- all resulting in a long period of denial that most of us call "our lives". That all ends when the opulent visions of Faery dawn- whether you are alive or dead, to be faced with the Great Otherness is to be faced with a power that tears you out of your boundaries and refuses to allow you to re-settle back into them. We can call that "death" or we can call it "spiritual awakening"- either way, your tidy life is over.

The wise and meritorious of this world have blessings lined up for them, to be sure- no God will control our destiny in the next world, only our quality as people, our hard-won wisdom, and our goodness. Those who want to split hairs with relativist arguments about goodness will have their mouths sewn shut by the pale hands of the imps of Elfhame, no matter how ingenious their arguments were in this world of drunks and fools. The wisdom of the half wise (and that includes those who turn a biting tongue to the idea of goodness or wisdom or love) is the dust that the throngs of the Ever-Living wipe from the bottoms of their shoes, the ashes and soot of the charnel houses of the Unseen World wherein all mortal illusions are burned.

Goodness is a power, and every heart knows good when it feels it. Wisdom is the same way- only the wise are safe from the Glamours of the Underworld and the Faerie throngs, for wisdom means knowing what is real from what seems to be real.

What is the measure of a man? Many have asked, and many have answered, but I say that the measure of a man is both his wisdom, and his capacity to give and receive love. A man is measured by who he loves, and who loves him back. And if you think that love- that mysterious power that drives us to sacrifice everything for the good of another- is a weakling's tower of retreat, you need look no further than the Ballad of Tam Lin to see it's great benefit. Love can fight the glamour of Faerie. It was Janet's love for Tam Lin that led her to fight off the terrible illusions of the Faeries, and rescue her love from the grasp of the Faerie Queen who held him.

Remember that the Faerie-people are not evil, and the majesty of their unseen world is not deadly; it is a reflection, in a way of this world: it is both good and evil, majestic and terrible, safe in times and seasons, and dangerous in others. To see them riding along, through day and night, on their faery-mounts, is to see a vision of great sacredness and great power- but the sacred can't be the sacred without a sense of awe. Bear in mind that the word "awful" is derived from "Awe-full"- to behold the Royalty of Faery is to see something full of awe; to see the dead, circling in their sacred transformations, to see the wise, transcended men and women of the Unseen, to see the shadows and the light of the Otherworld is to see something that inspires awe, which is genuinely awe-full. If you don't feel it, you haven't seen it.

Some believe that the inhabitants of the Unseen World are the Gods and Goddesses of old. To this, I answer: In my experience, some were, and some are still the Gods of some mortals who worship them. They do honor agreements and contracts and they do honor genuine worship, but not in the manner that most people hope- it is not a contract of sentiment but a contract of honor and of submission to necessity.

These “Lordly Ones in the Hollow Hill” do not tolerate flighty behavior; they do not maintain bonds with mortals who break promises, and they don't protect those who harm the land or besmirch beauty, memory, or wisdom. They gain from their relations with mortals, and they have powers we can't imagine. And yet, for all this, they will not live life for mortals, nor can they. A man or woman must be skilled, strong-hearted, and clever if they would have a successful relationship with the "Gods" of this world.

Many cannot do this; many cannot be this- too many are made lazy on the diet of prayer and submission taught by Christianity and Islam, in which one's life is laid down on the altar of the Ancient Hebrew God. The Gods of Old Europe don't take your life and live it for you; if you seek their power and gifts, and if you are fortunate (or unfortunate) enough to gain their true attentions, you will discover that your life will more than likely end in disaster if you refuse to do as the Awesome Mystery of the Wholeness and the Strange Wyrd-Will of the Unseen world beckons. If you open yourself to this reality, it makes demands. One good look inside, and you have new obligations.



You See Them and They See You

Posted ImageGazing into an abyss is no easy matter; the act of looking causes changes. There is no "one way sight"- to see something is to interact with it, to be changed by it. Looking into the depths means that the depths "look into you", in both a poetic sense, and in a very actual sense. One might speculate that the act of looking is a wholeness that our minds divide- perhaps unwisely- into two halves. If this is so for looking, for seeing, then it must be true for any mode of perception. There is a hidden key to wholeness in this sort of thinking.

And this same thinking can be applied to the world of our experience, and the unseen world. If you do this, and do it successfully, you discover the key to understanding the most awesome mystery of all- how and why you have a presence- a part of yourself- on the "other side". The Fetch-twin, the Faery Co-Walker, the Unseen Otherself is there; it's real; and while you stand, gazing with awe at the light between the two Thorn trees, or at the grim hump of the Faery-mound on certain nights, this Twin of yours is already feasting at the tables below, or riding in the Unseen Procession.

How alluring it seems! But the problem with the allure of the "Other" is simple: wholeness means death to mortal beings. Are you prepared to die? Wholeness is either death to your old way of seeing, believing, and thinking, or it is death in the traditional sense: your corpse to a grave, and your soul to the Faery-trod roads that lead under the roots and hills of this world into the reaches of the Unseen.

Don't be in denial, and don't be blind. Give this the seriousness it deserves. The ages-old charms against Faeries, that any student of folklore may find in any good book- they deserve a second look by you. If you have a family, you MUST protect them, for just being around you becomes its own species of danger for them.

There is a dangerous game being played here, by those who seek the wisdom of the true Faery-Faith: how to obtain the wisdom of wholeness without dying. Taliesin couldn't steal it from his own Faery-Queen without her showing her predatory face and devouring him; Tam Lin couldn't steal it without a more powerful magic preserving him; no story that tells us of the "theft of knowledge or wisdom" from the unseen world fails to show us the crimson and dark consequences of the theft.

Don't look the other way, regarding this: you are stealing from the Otherworld when you wish to plumb its secrets. I'm not saying that we shouldn't seek wholeness; I'm saying that Fate has seen fit NOT to bestow wholeness consciously on every living mortal; in this age, as in the past, conscious wholeness is reserved for those who are prepared to go against the grain, and risk great spiritual, mental, and physical dangers. You cannot start walking on this path, nor playing this chess game against the masters of the Unseen world, until you give them the greatest tribute they deserve: awe and respect, and enough fear to make you wise. This is the hidden Faery-meal; they know you as a serious player as soon as you reveal the wisdom of awe.

After that, a dangerous road starts, but one with the possibility of a great payoff. The wise will seek allies- allies in the unseen are no harder or easier to gain than allies in this world. Like with any long and difficult journey, the right allies, guides, and protectors are needed. Like with any kind of interaction between sentient beings, respect is the most important rule. A kind heart, a good heart, it is the best mark of your quality.

The right technologies are needed to face the dangers and obstacles that will be there. What you need is hiding in the traditions of our ancestral past; don't ignore them. And don't ever forget that what you are doing is a serious matter. I strongly urge each person who wishes to join in the games of the Underworld to reconsider at least a few times, and I urge any who have even the first bit of difficulty with these ideas to cease going forward, and retire from these matters altogether.





All text is Copyright © 2008 by Robin Artisson
All Rights Reserved


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#12 RavenFlyer

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 07:46 PM

Okay so today I just recieved The Witching Way of Hollow Hill. I will post a review when I get to read it. With mid terms in college comign up it may be a little while.

:carrot: :crystal-gazing: :Witch-1:

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#13 lurcher

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 12:56 PM

Look him up on Encyclopedia Dramatica and you will see how he has any fans.

Brian

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#14 RavenFlyer

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 04:17 PM

yeah i read that quite a while ago. Which is why i was always wary of him. But I will see how I feel as I read this book. usually I can call BS on an authors credibility as I go along.
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#15 Scott

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 11:27 AM

Greetings All

You know there are some people out there that had contact with someone who was in .. it rubs off a bit .. they then go a bit this way and that.

That is all fair comment. The only bit I find obnoxious is then trying to make it all vastly more complex than it is, collecting as many catchy wee terms as possible and then screaming abuse at anyone who asks the very good question: "What in gods name are you ON about!?"

In many ways it can't be written about and there are so many paths that there isn't a way .. and that being the case the premise for most books out there proclaim right up front that the authors don't believe their own copy.

(Of course as many write all about poetry, no practicality and avoid any concrete "so this and get that" it is easy to see when one reads closely that many of them are describing what others do - even when they say they do it themselves!!)

The other question I keep asking is: "If what you have actually works - why would you then go one about a dozen different paths - some of which if done right are antagonistic to each other?" *Shrugs*

My favourite was a situation I found myself in a while back ... an Asatruar thru and thru - who hung out with witches. *Shakes head* When I said "THINK .. about what you just said .. why would you again??" the point shot over the heads of those present and confirmed my point! lol

As for ol Robby ... well ... I have had one run in with him which showed he couldn't even cope with simple sentances through the paranoia. *Shrugs* Apparently he missed the fact that on that other list I was one of the people who tentatively supported his presence! lol Still as I keep saying, just cause somene is a witch doesn't mean they aren't insane or a tosser - vice versa holds too I am told! lol

Besides there is a lot of that about published or no - they make a point, you qestion it and they literally become abusive ... odd one might even be tempted to believe they couldn't answer a few simple questions about what they supposedly believe and practice... who'd athunk it! tee hee

Every book has at least one good point and he has known some people; even though I'd argue his words make it plain he is still outside I'd be interested to hear your report on it.

Fraternally

Scott

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#16 moonthorn

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 08:39 PM

Hello. This thread has helped me a little, but I have a specific question & don't feel the need to begin a new topic in regards to it:

As someone who rarely, if ever, works with books (everything is through trance, intuition, & fetchwork, with me), I have been curious about this man. I agree with many things he has said elsewhere.

Now that I've left the true Country, & am now back in the big city for a few months, I suddenly feel the need to look at his works, even just one of them, as a sort of guide. 

Has anyone been in a similar situation? Has anyone here read his "Ressurection of the Meadow"? Amazon gives glowing reviews. 


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#17 Belwenda

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 11:43 PM

I have "R of the M", it's interesting....I've not slogged through the whole thing though.


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"For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so" W.S.