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Brian Bates' Books


Michele

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Hey - I searched Brian Bates on the forum and didn't find anything (but then again, I do tend to be a bit computer impaired). I got his two books (Way of Wyrd and The Real Middle Earth) from the library. Am reading the Real M.E. and am very much enjoying it and finding it very useful. Okay, I admit I AM a huge Lord of Rings fan; however, this book is a non-fiction exploration of the magic and life of the Anglo Saxon time upon which Tolkein based his Middle Earth. Bates used historical, psychological and archaeological research and I love the philosophical way he lookes at WHY they believed the way they did. They had a very shamanic way of live, which i love, and he goes into several accounts of travels and journies. The first half of the book is a bit more historical,and the second half of the book is more looking at their magical beliefs, rituals and practices as recorded in poems, by christian monks and as peiced together from archaeological finds. REALLY enjoying it. Haven;t started Wyrd yet, but will let you know as soon as I do ;-) Anyone else read The Real M.E.?

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Guest Landieth

I've seen The Real Middle Earth in the bookstore.. didn't pick it up though. I might see if its still there next time I go. Not something I'd buy, necessarily, but would be a good read while I'm at the store.

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I think you'll like The Way of Wyrd. It's a very pleasant read, you hardly know that you're learning. :) I like to be taught that way, by stories. I haven't read The Real Middle Earth, but I am thinking about it. I don't know if Anglo-Saxon would be my path, but I have to say it probably had the most influence on it.

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Am doing W of W this weekend.... after my lawn is mowed and the dishes done, taking myself up to the pub for a glass of wine and a good read in the back corner.... ahhhhh - can't wait!

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Guest Lusifelia

I have both, and I liked Way of Wyrd, although after we moved it got lost so I never finished it :(

Real Middle Earth seemed to me to be more of a reference book or encyclopedia the way it was broken up and I hadn't delved into it very much, but I will have to take another look and give it a fair chance.

 

Now I want to tear apart the garage looking for the novel, though, lol.

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:thumbsup:"The Way of Wyrd" by Brian Bates was the book that got me back on the pagan path. From there, I started reading "The Real Middle Earth" and then became and Anglo-Saxon heathen, but I was focussed more on the historically accurate line, not the lines mixed up with Wicca. :sickwitch:

I still re-read "The Way of Wyrd" from time to time and, occasionally, drop into the website, too, even though I have since convered to a celtic path. I owe Mr Bates a huge debt of gratitude indeed. :kiss::eheheh::hearts::beerchug:

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Finished Way of Wyrd - throughly enjoyed it. Wish there was another one! I see Bates got a lot of the info he based the WofW on from, among other thiings, a manuscript that is (I believe) reprinted in a book on leechcraft. I googled the book and the cheapest was 50 bucks (a bit out of my range)... anyone read it and found it worth the 50 bucks??? The manuscript itself is said to be in a library in England, but it's not online that I could find.

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I googled the book and the cheapest was 50 bucks (a bit out of my range)... anyone read it and found it worth the 50 bucks??? The manuscript itself is said to be in a library in England, but it's not online that I could find.

 

I've got it and keep it as a reference. Mind you, I purchased it way back and it was cheaper then.

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AC - is it worth the 50 bucks? If you lost it would you pay 50 bucks to get another????? I rarely spend 50 bucks on anything that isn't a household bill lol.....

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AC - is it worth the 50 bucks? If you lost it would you pay 50 bucks to get another????? I rarely spend 50 bucks on anything that isn't a household bill lol.....

 

I'm not trying to be difficult, Michele, but I would be okay with $50, as the conversion to ?27 is quite favourable. I regularly spend around ?50 or ?60 for academically published books, so I would not think this exorbitant. And, yes, I would replace it.

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Place an order for both books last week, should be seeing them soon. Can't wait to start on them. Now that the kid started bowling on Saturdays, I get 2 hrs at the alley to read!!! By the by, I paid $15.99 US for each book. Where is $50 coming from?

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The book way of wyrd is a fictional book based on historical shamanic rituals and psychological interpretations of the culture (Brian Bates is a professor of psychology I think)... so it is fiction based on possible real-life senarios. One of the sources of the herb lore and ritual was a manuscript about leechcraft that is in a British library and parts of said manuscript are in a specific book on leechcraft (forget the name) and I googled the book and cheapest I found was 50 bucks. Only problem with internet buying is one can't look at the book first (although I suppose one could always return it.. I'd just be too lazy lol).

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Michele,

I have both Stephen Pollington's "Leechcraft" and "Anglo-Saxon Remedies, Charms, and Prayers from British Library MS Harley 585. Volume I: Introduction, Text, Translation, " as translated by Edward Pettit. I take it these are the two books to which you refer?

Ancestral Celt

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Thanks Michele...must have missed something. My books came today but its one of those days that every minute is booked with something to do. We'll start on them tomorrow. Can't wait!!

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Ac - yeah - how do you like them? I do wish one could review a book prior to buying it off the internet.

 

The other thing is I don't live in that geographical local, and I would love to know what the peoples of this area used; however, that would be getting away from craft and more into Native American shamanism. I don't connect that much to the Native American "feeling" (although I do have a great repect for them and their love of the earth), but much more so to the Anglo-Saxon ways of working...

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Ac - yeah - how do you like them? I do wish one could review a book prior to buying it off the internet.

 

In most cases you can. Try searching for books at Google Books, as it has previews for most books, some books you can read in entirety.

I use both books as references when searching out herbal lore (to distinguish celtic from Anglo-Saxon) or looking for things to use for healing work. Both are invaluable to me. I should point out I started out as an Anglo-Saxon pagan, but have since converted to a more "celtic" path (for want of a better term).

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