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Living Green on a String


Guest Tiger Lady

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Guest Tiger Lady

I know being green has become a sort of fadish sort of thing but I figure "hey, at least its not a bad fad". What I don't like is how expensive being green has become since its become a fad. Part of being green is being responsible and that includes money wise as well. If I tried to buy all the organic soaps and foods - I just wouldn't be able to afford to be green. I bought Living Green on a String A Guide to Tight Green Living by Mary Beth Gump and its helped me make a slow transition into living a greener life. I've used the recipes out of it to make soaps, detergents, and cleaners and I really, really like them. My family does too. I've also started making some of the food recipes out of it which includes granola. My husband has never been able to eat store bought granola because it gives him heartburn, but this recipe doesn't. He loves it. In fact, he calls it the perfect food. I've been making it in bulk and am extremely excited about the fact that I'm feeding my family something that does not include MSG or High Fructose Corn Syrup.

 

The book also outlines how to do square foot gardening; how to make biomass stoves; making your own solar panels (which is much less expensive); recipes for detergents, personal hygiene, and crafts for children.

 

I probably won't be transformed into a greener over night, change is hard especially for me, but I've taken a few steps in that direction and this book has helped me out a lot in the past few months. What I didn't realize was how easy the change has been. Making your own detergent isn't that hard and it doesn't take that much time. And on the plus side - I can make a big bottle of detergent for a little less than $3. What I have learned is that changing into a greener person has just become a different way of thinking, it hasn't changed the amount of time I have on my hands. I just wanted to pass along the tips. The author has a website you can check out http://www.lilliput-primitives-company.com/.

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Thanks for the link TL!

 

One thing I've done is to start using rechargeable batteries. Talk about expensive! The initial cost is astronomical compared to regular alkaline batteries, but worth it in the long run, both money wise and green wise.

Next, I want to buy a solar charger like the Solio (or similar) to recharge those batteries, furthering the double savings.

 

I recently found some all natural, plain granola at the health food section at my local supermarket, man, it's hard to find without all the extra flavorings and junk.

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I plan on purchasing this book soon as part of my payday/pay me program.

As to going green, I have already divided my trash in to paper/plastic and glass, and drop it off in local bins on my way to another place in my big circle of travel. I limit my travel to one day a week with the exception of medical appointments. It still becomes a part of a second circle.

I think that the "oil price bonanza" has made people irreversably change their lives. That's a good thing. We are becoming more Earth conscious. And, at this rate, could almost survive a depression better than the obscenely rich.

So, this "Big Oil" strategy may just backfire.

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Thanks for the link TL. I too am trying to do the green thing on a budget as well. I try to be as green as I can, but sadly, the cost of eco-friendly products are quite high. So any tips and home-made how-to's are quite welcome in my book!

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There are a great deal of homede things here in the forum, one just has to look around. A lot of things are better and healthier and made from things you may have in the house, or IS inexpensive to buy in bulk. Or you probably have a few of the herbs in your stockpile. So, with a bit of compilation, I bet it could be done. In the meantime, Explore the food and sharing spells and other such threads. There is a lot to learn.

Trad is not just spells and curses and hexing and such, it is controlling your own growing, healing and home life in a way that keeps you and your loved ones healthy. It is a way to make a living from the craft, and to sustain yourself as well. That includes green living to any extent that you can do it. ou KNOW how your food and your herb garden was grown.

The cycle of life starts at the simplest of organic mulch piles.

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If I remember right, that is Green Sprite's book that she wrote. She suggested it to me a few months ago and I have not had a chance to get it.

 

It does have a lot of good things in it. I would be interested in detergent for clothes seeing the cost is going up and the amount you get is getting smaller.

 

Check with Green Sprite and see if its her that wrote the book. :wave:

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Thanks for the review, worth pursuing.

Can anyone remember a while ago a link was posted to a short video about self sufficiency. I remember being v. impressed with it and wanted to watch again. It had a solar shower, lots of lovely crops and other stuff.

Oh and...what's granola?!

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Guest Rebie
Thanks for the review, worth pursuing.

 

Can anyone remember a while ago a link was posted to a short video about self sufficiency. I remember being v. impressed with it and wanted to watch again. It had a solar shower, lots of lovely crops and other stuff.

 

Oh and...what's granola?!

 

I remember watching that vidio. It was really interesting. Can't remember what section it was in though.

Rebie

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Guest Rebie
Thanks for the review, worth pursuing.

 

Can anyone remember a while ago a link was posted to a short video about self sufficiency. I remember being v. impressed with it and wanted to watch again. It had a solar shower, lots of lovely crops and other stuff.

 

Oh and...what's granola?!

 

Found that video. It is in public chit chat. here is the link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iZ8T...eature=related

 

Rebie

Edited by Rebie
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Thanks for the review, worth pursuing.

 

Can anyone remember a while ago a link was posted to a short video about self sufficiency. I remember being v. impressed with it and wanted to watch again. It had a solar shower, lots of lovely crops and other stuff.

 

Oh and...what's granola?!

 

I cant remember where that link is?

 

Granola is a breakfast food and snack food made from rolled oats, seeds, nuts, honey, dried fruits, etc that is baked until crispy. It's pretty tasty!

 

Not to highjack the thread, but a great book for all you aspiring homestead/self sufficient/green folks is Carla Emery's, "The Encyclopedia of Country Living". It has everything and is a great read too. Another not so well known book is, "Country Wisdom, the Art of Successful Homesteading".

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Guest Bean Sprite

I love Carla's encyclopedia. I know her well. I also recomend "the self sufficient life and how to live it."

 

Yes, "Living Green on a String", is my book. Well, it's a series, but I'm working on the second one now.

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Not to highjack the thread, but a great book for all you aspiring homestead/self sufficient/green folks is Carla Emery's, "The Encyclopedia of Country Living". It has everything and is a great read too.

 

Thanks for recommendation! Added this one to my Amazon wish list.

 

I was just discussing this today with a co-worker, saying how I want to live on a farm and be self-sufficient/sustaining and completely off the grid. She was definitely not on the same page as me and much prefers a lazy life of convenience stores and fast food crap. :yuck:

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Guest Tiger Lady

What I like about the book is it can be used for both the die hards and the beginners (like me). Maybe one day my family and I'll be able to go off the grid, which would be so cool (Lela - I give you props for wanting to do so as well), but for right now learning how to make detergents and cleaning products is a pretty cool step. Bean Sprite has taught me a lot about the toxins in my house and what I can do to reduce them. I also sleep better knowing that the water that drains from my septic into my drainfield (which is a wooded area full of deer, bear, and other fluffly animals) is a little more eco friendly thanks to her recipes.

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Guest Bean Sprite

I'm glad my book could help you TL.

I am suprised. I wasn't expecting a review, but that's pretty cool.

The whole reason for the book was to fund a self -sufficient farm for everyone to learn from, free of charge.

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Ooooh cool , I might be making a donation to the fund soon then when I can go on a book splurge.

I know one I'm very keen on is buying second hand furniture rather than new , flat pack and cr*** , It often needs a bit of tidying up but you'll be amazed what you can do if you get a decent sander followed by a good rub down with home made furniture polish {can't remember if I put the recipe up , if I didn't someone shout at me!}

Peg looming with scraps and plastic bags is good and I'm hankering after a bokashi bin at some point so I can reduce my rubbish even further.

Cooh ain't we just the bunch of :cool_witch:

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Yes, "Living Green on a String", is my book. Well, it's a series, but I'm working on the second one now.

 

That is awesome Bean Sprite!! I'm putting this on my wish list, hopefully the hubby will take the hint and get it for me. We live on a pretty tight budget and anything that will A) Help us save money by me doing it myself and B) Help the environment is something I'm all for. I especially can't wait to find out how to make my own soaps, detergents, and cleaners. With 4 kids they make a huge mess all the time and I hate using so many chemicals to get my house clean.

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I would love to come down to your farm, Green Sprite and learn more. I grew up in the farm lands here, but the most we had was a horse and a hugh veggie garden and various critters. My current garden is big, with expansion again planned for next year. I'm already getting cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers and loads of herbs. I know some about growing but I would love to learn more,,,,maybe next year? I could come for a few weeks?

 

I do alot with recycling that Green Sprite recommended and it works out well here. I've already a little money saving by not using paper towels and using regualar towel then washing them. All my laundry is done by cold water and its saved on the cost of gas/electric. I even use candles and try not to use electric. Course, earlier this week I had no choice when storms went thru and we were without power for 3 days.

 

My sons gf uses the old ways when she has her montly. At least that what he says. I haven't seen her for awhile, so I need to talk to her on that one. I would think you could save alot of money over a short period of time.

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TL - I'd LOVE it if u posted some of the osap and detergent recipes that have worked for you... I've tried several, and I can't get the soaps to "sups up". FOr detergent I've just been using a mix of washing soda and borax, which workes very well and even gets the dirt stains off the fridge handle (think teenagers!)... anyway - would love some of the recipes if u can!!!!!

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Guest Bean Sprite

If you look on the website that TL posted or the link at the bottom of this page, I posted tons of tips and I encourage others to share, no matter how small or silly it might seem to them. Every little bit counts.

 

Eco and home made soaps don't necessarily lather like comercial soaps, but it isn't the lather that cleans anyways. The lather that you get from commercial soaps is the bad stuff you want to avoid as they are surfactants, and phosforus that are extremely bad for the environment. Home and eco soaps use agents that soften the water and pull the dirt out and away from the clothes and sufaces with natural and friendlier ingredients, hence more suds are not always better.

 

I have a recipe for the powdered detergent too. It does not cake up in the wash like commercial detergent when you wash your clothea and it is easy to make.

 

2 cups grated soap bits, pieces, bars of any kind (use the smallest side of the cheese grater)

4 boxes of of brand baking soda

1 box of 20 Mule Team Borax ( find it in the laundry isle)

 

Combine your dried ingredients together and use 1/2 cup per wash load.

 

It's the simplest recipe in the world to make and it makes about 2 gallons of washing powder. It washes clean and your clothes will not need fabric softener as it softens the clothes already.

 

Michele did you try the clycerine soap I posted yet?

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If you look on the website that TL posted or the link at the bottom of this page, I posted tons of tips and I encourage others to share, no matter how small or silly it might seem to them. Every little bit counts.

 

Eco and home made soaps don't necessarily lather like comercial soaps, but it isn't the lather that cleans anyways. The lather that you get from commercial soaps is the bad stuff you want to avoid as they are surfactants, and phosforus that are extremely bad for the environment. Home and eco soaps use agents that soften the water and pull the dirt out and away from the clothes and sufaces with natural and friendlier ingredients, hence more suds are not always better.

 

I have a recipe for the powdered detergent too. It does not cake up in the wash like commercial detergent when you wash your clothea and it is easy to make.

 

2 cups grated soap bits, pieces, bars of any kind (use the smallest side of the cheese grater)

4 boxes of of brand baking soda

1 box of 20 Mule Team Borax ( find it in the laundry isle)

 

Combine your dried ingredients together and use 1/2 cup per wash load.

 

It's the simplest recipe in the world to make and it makes about 2 gallons of washing powder. It washes clean and your clothes will not need fabric softener as it softens the clothes already.

 

Michele did you try the clycerine soap I posted yet?

 

Thanks to posts like this one, and others throughout the forum, I have officially started to keep a "Green Grimoire." Thanks to all for contributing these great ideas for going green.

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If you look on the website that TL posted or the link at the bottom of this page, I posted tons of tips and I encourage others to share, no matter how small or silly it might seem to them. Every little bit counts.

 

Eco and home made soaps don't necessarily lather like comercial soaps, but it isn't the lather that cleans anyways. The lather that you get from commercial soaps is the bad stuff you want to avoid as they are surfactants, and phosforus that are extremely bad for the environment. Home and eco soaps use agents that soften the water and pull the dirt out and away from the clothes and sufaces with natural and friendlier ingredients, hence more suds are not always better.

 

I have a recipe for the powdered detergent too. It does not cake up in the wash like commercial detergent when you wash your clothea and it is easy to make.

 

2 cups grated soap bits, pieces, bars of any kind (use the smallest side of the cheese grater)

4 boxes of of brand baking soda

1 box of 20 Mule Team Borax ( find it in the laundry isle)

 

Combine your dried ingredients together and use 1/2 cup per wash load.

 

It's the simplest recipe in the world to make and it makes about 2 gallons of washing powder. It washes clean and your clothes will not need fabric softener as it softens the clothes already.

 

What do you do if you don't use bar soap? I make liquid soap for us to use. Sorry for the stupid question!

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