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Protection & Reversal Magick - Jason Miller

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If I have one complaint, it's that he often suggests incantations which are completely in latin, but he provides no pronunciation key.

 

For those not trained in "dead languages" (which I think is a misnomer given the number of Latin phrases in everyday vocabulary), this page is a quick guide to pronunciation:

 

http://www.byzantinecommunications.com/adamhoward/latinpron.html

 

BTW, Latin was taught in school MUCH later than the 50's! I'm old, but not THAT old ;). Latin was offered as an elective for me. Wish I'd taken it now (am trying to slog through The Discoverie of Witchcraft by Reginald Scott <written in 1584>, which is basically a refutation of the Malleus Maleficarum and quotes the MM in Latin) but my training in French usually allows me to muddle through.

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I just finished this book; not going to add a full review since the topic has many general replies; but since thread hasn't been addressed in years; I figured i would make some highlights for other newbies to the site (like myself):

 

I recommend this book highly. I also recommend reading it in its entirety, marking what is particularly of interest and use for future reference. I read the whole book in a few nights.

 

I like the structure of the book across multiple paths/traditions and experiences without preaching one over the other. The Introduction could have been 1 page. He went a little overboard convincing you why you need the book.

 

The book, as mentioned previously does have significant ceremonial vibe to it. I'm not ceremonial, so I didn't earmark those pages. The book is separated into 9 chapters; I'll highlight a few things here.

 

The book provides practical ways to address protection and reversal magic without crazy tools or extremely detailed ritual behavior. He does have an affinity for Hekate, but he states this clearly, provides alternatives, and explanation. For example, when he describes a Banishing Ritual, he describes one he created referred to as a "Hekatean arcana," but also mentioned the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram, Aleister Crowley's Star Ruby, and Aurum Solis' Rousing of the Citadels.

 

Protection for the home held several practical, easily references bit of information for Floor Washes (Clear Away Malifica, Exorcism, Peace, Repelling & Keep Away, and Spiritual Cleansing). He provides guidance and creating things yourself and when to practice. Powders and amulets were also useful. I wish those parts had more substance, if for nothing else than I enjoy the simplicity with which he writes.

 

The section on Artificial Spirits was most interesting and left me with a significant desire to learn more on the topic.

 

Healing and Recovery was a welcome part of the book because it brings it full circle and reminds us that because the malefic actions have stopped; we still must make effort to heal and then come back to the beginning of ensuring protection in our lives.

 

The book is full of nuggets without a lot of fluff. Practicality is key and for this traditional witch, I don't have the time or patience to read a bunch of fluff. The book has a well documented index. I tested several things i wanted to look up, and they were listed in Index. The Notes and Suggested Further Study was extremely useful for the bibliophile, and I added several items to my read list. The section on Hekate was interesting and while I'm not really the goddess worship type, I may read one of the books just from a perspective of learning.

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Everything I want to say about this book I think has already been said, but I like to talk so I'll say it again anyway.

 

I found a copy some time ago and enjoyed it very much. It was on the top of my list to buy.

 

The book says "beyond 101" but it is easily accessible and understandable even to beginners like myself.

 

The main thing I liked about the book is that you don't have to follow his lore and path to make use of it. Other "practical" books I pick up immediately start lecturing me on how my beliefs need to be; I need to maintain the writer's belief about the astral plane, higher self, classes of spirits, how they work, and so on, before their techniques can be applicable to me. In Miller's book, he basically says, "bad things happen and here's a bunch of ways to deal with them," without trying to teach the basics of witchcraft or preach about his path.

 

His book covers a wide variety of approaches and I feel most people will connect with some of them. Some of the parts are a touch too ceremonial for me and many of his rituals involve evoking god forms, but he states fairly often that the reader should appropriately adapt things to their own use. As far as the Latin/Greek in the book goes, the majority of the time he provides English translations and I can only recall 2 or 3 instances where a phrase is not translated.

 

For myself, this book is a winner because it is easy to digest (I read the whole thing today in about 3 hours), straight-forward, and PRACTICAL. A very experienced witch may not glean much from it, but it's an easy reference for people who need to get down to business without a lot of time to spare.

 

On another note, I bought "The Practical Psychic Self-Defense Handbook" by Robert Bruce today. It's a bit of a slower read and the post above about water pipes made me laugh, as he does reference it quite a bit. Unfortunately there was a bit at the very beginning that set me off on the wrong foot. He has an affirmation printed he calls the Core Affirmation, with this introduction: "The Core Affirmation heads every chapter and is extensively used throughout this book. It is shown frequently so it sinks into your mind and thus becomes easy to remember." I don't know if I'm being unreasonable, but the idea that the author loaded his book with an affirmation so it would be forced to 'sink in' to my brain rubbed me the wrong way. I'm sure it's very lovely, but the first time I read it I didn't particularly care for it and then immediately reading that it was plastered across the book so my naughty brain couldn't ignore rankled me. It made the book immediately seem very fluffy and put me off from reading the rest, but I've seen it well-recommended so I'm trying to push through.

Edited by Wexler

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At least he gave a warning in the beginning.

 

Just don't bother reading that part.

 

Would you share what the affirmation is or would that get it too deep into your brain?

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At least he gave a warning in the beginning.

 

Just don't bother reading that part.

 

Would you share what the affirmation is or would that get it too deep into your brain?

Oh no worries, I'm sure my irritability forms a formidable defense against the well-wishes of others.

 

Core Affirmation: "I am loved and I am worthy. I am

safe and I am free. I am powerfully protected. I am

master of my body and ruler of my mind."

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That's actually a pretty decent affirmation.

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I have this book, and got good results from the contents. I love the banishing ritual in there, as well as the warding. This is one of the catalysts for my interest in Hekate, as well as the idea to use a mala for more than hindu and buddhist entities. He doesn't have a set tradition, but pretty much uses what works. Very creative in the mixing of magicks. Like the Hekatean (word?) use of using the banishing phrase "hekas hekas este bebeloi".

 

No relation to me.

Edited by Scorpio1981

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I have finished reading this book, thanks so much for mentioning it on here :)

 

I liked it, and found it really helped me to fill in the gaps that were in my own protection work, and helped me to formulate my own morning and evening protection ritual.

 

I didn't mind so much that she used Hekate in her examples, but it did feel as though, because I don't work with Hekate, I was a bit, 'the fuck am I supposed to do, then?' I did try using her banishing ritual, with some tweaks, and it just wasn't for me, personally. The great thing it did, though, was highlighted my need to add a good, workable, strong banishing ritual into my routine, so in that way, I did my research and came up with something that was completely right for me.

 

I felt that it covered the basics of most areas we should be focusing on. I liked the examples it gave for warnings that your protections had been compromised. However, I would've liked for her to have gone further in depth with that, such as talisman suggestions we could make for the home, to help work as a magical 'alarm' system. I felt it promised more than it delivered in that section, but I certainly still found some useful info there, anyway.

 

I really do wish, no matter what type of witch an author is, that they'd start the book with a clear, quick explanation of what their personal practise entails. Eg, are they wiccan, UK based, santeria, native american, etc? I mean, I know you get a bit of a vibe as you read the book, but I feel this would be the courteous thing for authors to do, just so I can get an idea of the flavour of their practise, not so much their life story or anything!

 

That way, I can decide how I feel about the techniques I want to consider using, eg, am I stepping on another culture, or is this aspect of the work ok? I was a little confused because she clearly works with Hekate, but I couldn't tell if she was into hoodoo/voodoo as well, or not? Or is she throwing different cultures together? It's not that I want to judge another witch's practice, but I want to understand the person I'm learning from, and I do think it's important.

 

Overall though, I would recommend this book for anyone, particularly beginners, especially if you're looking for a stable, regular routine. I am so pleased that I was able to come up with something for mornings and evenings that was quick (but not rushed), efficient, that I can do privately without my kids asking what I'm doing LOL. And I'm honestly feeling as though my own energy, and that of our home, is much better for it. I also liked that there were some extra things you can do on top of this if you choose, such as spiritual baths (although that is really short; I plan to get a book dedicated to that topic)

 

I really loved the shielding ideas. I have tried shielding before from another witch who, although is starting a trad path, most of her knowledge is wicca based. So, her technique she taught me was effective, but the technique in the book is better, plus it's more suited to me, personally. I also really appreciated her going to good lengths to explain the practical reasons for WHY we should have a meditation practice, WHY should we make an offering, etc. The WHY being discussed in such great depth actually motivated me to get off my backside and commit to being more consistent in doing it regularly, and in a more disciplined way, and as a result, I feel that my life is better for it. Some books just assume you know what grounding means, for example, or what the bleeding hell an offering is for, but I started this path with no clue, and I'm sure I'm not the only one.

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