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Wormwood Salve


spinney
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thinking of making wormwood salve.

I don't have a recipe so im making one up and need some critisism lol.

 

Steep dried wormwood in oil add to beeswax.

 

that it basically what do you think?

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  • 3 years later...

thinking of making wormwood salve.

I don't have a recipe so im making one up and need some critisism lol.

 

Steep dried wormwood in oil add to beeswax.

 

that it basically what do you think?

 

 

This sounds just great, Spinney. Are or Did you use artemisia absinthium ? Ancient literature is full of praise for this herb. Yet I've only seen it referencing the "plant absintium ". Can you clarify this for me, or maybe Mountain Witch can, is there a difference between wormwood, and artemisia absinthium ? I was thinking about infusing bruised wormwood, into a carrier oil and using it that way. If you don't mind offering your view, what properties did the beeswax offer your salve ?

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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This sounds just great, Spinney. Are or Did you use artemisia absinthium ? Ancient literature is full of praise for this herb. Yet I've only seen it referencing the "plant absintium ". Can you clarify this for me, or maybe Mountain Witch can, is there a difference between wormwood, and artemisia absinthium ? I was thinking about infusing bruised wormwood, into a carrier oil and using it that way. If you don't mind offering your view, what properties did the beeswax offer your salve ?

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Artemisia absinthium is indeed Wormwood. Cousin to another of our favorites, Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris. CG, beeswax stiffens the oil, making it into a salve. Otherwise you just have an infused oil!

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thinking of making wormwood salve.

I don't have a recipe so im making one up and need some critisism lol.

 

Steep dried wormwood in oil add to beeswax.

 

that it basically what do you think?

 

 

I'm curious hun, since this was from 2008. How did it turn out? And did you add anything to it such as lavender for scent?

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Artemisia absinthium is indeed Wormwood. Cousin to another of our favorites, Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris. CG, beeswax stiffens the oil, making it into a salve. Otherwise you just have an infused oil!

 

 

Thank you M.Witch for weighing in on this, I needed to know if there was a difference and you clarified that for me. I'm grateful, I so suck at Latin ! lol !

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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  • 10 months later...

YOu can also slow simmer wormwood in lard ina 1/1 cup proportion then add around 4 tbsp of beesewax to make it really thick has a really powerful scent this way

and is pretty quick.

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  • 1 year later...

I'm going to try and make some wormwood salve/ointment. I have a shrub that is reaching tree like proportions and I am at a loss as to what to do with so much. Dry some, tincture some, salve some....the tree needs a prune so something has to be done with all the leftover. I'm a bit bad letting it get out of hand like this but I think it look awesome in its current feral state. I've not tried wormwood salve before by itself so it'll be interesting, although I am considering adding mugwort and going for an Artemisia vibe with it.

post-960-0-79407700-1408949394_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stacey
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  • 1 year later...

That is one beautiful wormwood shrub!

 

As I am necro-ing this thread and it has been a year since its inception, any of you lovely folk managed to make some wormwood salve, how did it turn out and what use are you putting it to (if that is up for disclosure).

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  • 4 months later...

Was pretty curious of this, too, so I called a friend from ye olde tech-school botany class about it. She says she uses wormwood salve every so often to take care of the bruises she gets at work with great success. Apparently it's particularly good at keeping bruises from developing where you know you got banged up pretty hard, but that's probably only a bit of the good this plant had to offer. Beautiful specimen you've got there, Stacey~

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Aah, I had wondered if, for that, whether smoking or ingesting the herb would be a better route? The word "salve" just immediately brings medicinal treatments to mind, for me. How would that go?

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Yes, you can smoke wormwood, and you can make alcohol tinctures for drinking. I love this plant and it's sister mugwort. It is similar to mugwort in its effects but a bit more intense. It is great for lucid dreaming and improved dream recall. It is useful for spirit work as it makes it easier to perceive the unseen. Thujone is the substance that supposedly causes the psychoactive effects of wormwood and mugwort. It is toxic in large amounts, and can build up in you system, so it is not recommended to use frequently. When mixed with alcohol the toxic effects are increased. Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the ingredient used in the spirit absinthe that allegedly gives it its magickal and mythical properties. 

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When mixed with alcohol the toxic effects are increased. Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the ingredient used in the spirit absinthe that allegedly gives it its magickal and mythical properties. 

 

 

Wow, had no idea that Wormwood was an ingredient in Absinthe.  That would explain a lot.

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@Christine, that makes perfect sense.  Don't worry, I won't be drinking wormwood infused Pernod anytime soon LOL

 

In fact I won't be drinking Pernod, yuk.

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I recently ordered some mugwort seeds and plan to have a go at growing my own. In the meantime I thought it would be an idea to buy a young plant from somewhere to familiarise myself with it, but there is nowhere to get one from. So that tells me I need to be patient. I would be hesitant to ingest it in any way (and as for wormwood, I'm not even going there) but would like to investigate what I can do with placing the leaves in strategic places and generally having the plant around and familiarizing myself with the spirit. I suppose you could say I am very cautious in this area!

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I learned a whole new level of respect for poisonous plants last spring. 

 

I've never gotten poison ivy.  I'm the moron that you see wading into it with shorts, flip flops and a pocket knife to clear it out.  So, we were cleaning the vines off the trees in the back, I identified vining poison oak, and continued on with the days chores.

 

It turns out, I have an anaphylactic reaction to poison oak.  Who knew?  I didn't. 

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  • 6 months later...

i commonly use a wormwood salve but its also got sagebrush and mugwort in it i use it as a flying ointment sometimes for bruises or as a oil when warmed for assistance in divination or necromancy

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  • 4 months later...

I recently made a 3 artemesia ointment, similar to what Levinthross mentioned that I think works quite well. Wormwood, Mugwort and Tarragon.

This works well as an aid for meditation, trance and dreaming and is also a great topical treatment for pain, to speed the healing of bruises and reduce inflammation.

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  • 1 year later...

Yes, you can smoke wormwood, and you can make alcohol tinctures for drinking. I love this plant and it's sister mugwort. It is similar to mugwort in its effects but a bit more intense. It is great for lucid dreaming and improved dream recall. It is useful for spirit work as it makes it easier to perceive the unseen. Thujone is the substance that supposedly causes the psychoactive effects of wormwood and mugwort. It is toxic in large amounts, and can build up in you system, so it is not recommended to use frequently. When mixed with alcohol the toxic effects are increased. Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the ingredient used in the spirit absinthe that allegedly gives it its magickal and mythical properties. 

 

How often would you say it would be feasible to use without it causing harm?

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