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Witchcraft in America


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#41 Athena

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:51 PM

Not everyone forgets. I see Native American tribal magic as some of the most authentic stuff here in the States. Even hoodoo and the folk magic of the hills pull from some of it especially the rootworking. That is why witchcraft in the States have a different flavor than British traditional craft because of the Native American influence. So it is important here. People tend to forget about that in favor of strictly European or African witchcraft but the truth is, its all mixed here, just like our heritage and you are now starting to see people realize that and pull away from wicca and its parent craft in favor a more mixed approach that is more in line with who they are and where they grew up.


Thank you whiterosé,
I know not everyone forgets but when I see books like that and they completely write us out its frustrating and hurtful. Part of the reason I joined this site was to talk with others who not only have similar beliefs but also know how it feels to be treated like a dirty heathen. I have actually had Christians call me that plus you get those who are non tribal members who live on or near the boundries and get upset because they can't just do what ever they want with the small amount of land we have left. On the policewives site I belong to one member actually said she thought all resrvations where dirty and full of drunks .

I have gotten in many arguments over my decision to not only treat but to educate other races because it is a hot button issue. My belief is that in order to claim our contributions we have to teach at least some of our beliefs and knowledge. I supose to that end I should write a thread about it I'm just a little worried about it because there are many tribes with diffrent practices and there's no way to include everyone or not offend some for what ever reason.


#42 Whiterose

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:31 AM

I'm sure you know that as a "dirty heathen" you are accepted here and are among friends. ;)

#43 sarasuperid

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:29 PM

I have heard repeatedly that most Native Americans object to their practices being called witchcraft. So I imagine that is why the term isn't imposed upon their practices by historians and writers, out of respect. The terms Medicine man or Medicine woman are more appropriate, and sometimes the term Shaman is used.
"A Craft, a calling, a set of Keys to unlock a particular cosmology that is borne, and born, in the blood of the practitioner, and sets the Work to be done with which one may commune with those who hold the patterns and keys of the life of the practitioner and hir stream. The Work is to be done, and we are to do it." --Aiseling the Bard

#44 The Exile

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:42 PM

I have heard repeatedly that most Native Americans object to their practices being called witchcraft. So I imagine that is why the term isn't imposed upon their practices by historians and writers, out of respect. The terms Medicine man or Medicine woman are more appropriate, and sometimes the term Shaman is used.


It is interesting but could it be that they reject the term of "witchcraft" because of what the european descended people think witchcraft is ?

But to me the native americans have their own "magic", just like any other groups have their own "magic", the gypsies have there own stuff, the african descended people have their own stuff, etc. etc.

but they are with different names

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#45 sarasuperid

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:46 PM

If someone identifies as a witch, and I recognize it in them, then by all means. But if they don't want the label, I will relate to them with the label they prefer if it is reasonable. I won't call someone unicorn sprinkles even if they like it, because I am a bitch and I don't think its diginified to talk that way. But In general I will respect any reasonable request for people who self label their magical practice a certain way.
"A Craft, a calling, a set of Keys to unlock a particular cosmology that is borne, and born, in the blood of the practitioner, and sets the Work to be done with which one may commune with those who hold the patterns and keys of the life of the practitioner and hir stream. The Work is to be done, and we are to do it." --Aiseling the Bard

#46 Aloe

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:06 PM

I have heard repeatedly that most Native Americans object to their practices being called witchcraft. So I imagine that is why the term isn't imposed upon their practices by historians and writers, out of respect. The terms Medicine man or Medicine woman are more appropriate, and sometimes the term Shaman is used.


I agree, N.A. traditional practices may be similar to witchcraft but almost every N.A. I know strongly objects to any implied syncretism of the two. I would think that leaving out Native American practices was a matter or respect, or an attempt to avoid a legal suit for slander.

"The people who live in the Ozark country of Missouri and Arkansas were, until very recently, the most deliberately unprogressive people in the United States. Descended from pioneers who came West from the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the nineteenth century, they made little contact with the outer world for more than a hundred years. They seem like foreigners to the average urban American, but nearly all of them come of British stock, and many families have lived in America since colonial days. Their material heirlooms are few, but like all isolated illiterates they have clung to the old songs and obsolete sayings and outworn customs of their ancestors." Ozark Magic and Folklore

#47 Marabet

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:27 PM

I just don't understand the point of calling it witchcraft. It wouldn't validate either any more. It seems completely useless to me.
I ran to a tower where the church bells chime
I hoped that they would clear my mind
They left a ringing in my ear
But that drum's still beating loud and clear

{Florence + The Machine 'Drumming Song'}

#48 aurorarosepsychic

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 04:00 PM

Not sure if this is relevant, but I found a book about a year ago called "long lost friend" it is a pennsylvania dutch's grimiore basically it was written I believe in either the early 1800's or the late 1700's and what I noticed was, that it seemed as though after the xtians came into the picture I guess to not be caught they would mingle their beliefs or craft back then to coincide with xtianity and it seems that some people started to mix the two completely to maintain their heritage yet not be caught practicing.  There were a lot of spells in their that contained xtian scriptures or prayers to the xtian god but would also call for things that were definitely witchcraft.  I am a lover of history so I found this very interesting.



#49 Autumn Moon

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 06:08 PM

That book has been recently published as well through Troy Books. It was edited and illustrated by Gemma Gary, who also wrote a book on Cornish Witchcraft.

Many Pellars in England also did the same thing you mention, that is, combine practices with Christianity.


#50 Jevne

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:50 PM

Not sure if this is relevant, but I found a book about a year ago called "long lost friend" it is a pennsylvania dutch's grimiore basically it was written I believe in either the early 1800's or the late 1700's and what I noticed was, that it seemed as though after the xtians came into the picture I guess to not be caught they would mingle their beliefs or craft back then to coincide with xtianity and it seems that some people started to mix the two completely to maintain their heritage yet not be caught practicing.  There were a lot of spells in their that contained xtian scriptures or prayers to the xtian god but would also call for things that were definitely witchcraft.  I am a lover of history so I found this very interesting.

 

If you want to discuss or offer your review . . .

 

http://www.tradition...?hl="long lost"



#51 aurorarosepsychic

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:55 PM

If you want to discuss or offer your review . . .

 

http://www.tradition...?hl="long lost"

oh okay sorry if I brought that up in the wrong spot just this conversation reminded me of it my apologies hun



#52 Jevne

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 09:10 PM

oh okay sorry if I brought that up in the wrong spot just this conversation reminded me of it my apologies hun

 

Not wrong spot, just wanted you to know it had been discussed elsewhere on the forum . . .



#53 The Exile

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:41 PM

This also reminded me of the people that practice Voodoo / Vodoun , they also have some of their Loa hidden behind Xtian saints.

 

Thanks for mentioning the book "Long Lost Friend"  Recently got a couple of Gemma Gary's books and will check this one out.

 

.

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#54 Autumn Moon

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 07:06 PM

It is very different than Gemmas other books. Very, Christianfied (is there such a word?). Not that it is a bad thing, but may not be everyone's cup of tea.