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witch4u2praise

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witch4u2praise

how can i raise my kids (when i have them) to be witches and not be influenced by chrisitian society? Most of my friends are raising their children free from religion so that they may choose? Is that a better choice? I just fear my kids will be ridiculed by christian children like i was when i was growing up. what can i do?:confused:

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I think it depends on the community you are in.

 

For example. If you are in a community where the majority is Christian, your kids would not fit in and would be ridiculed (or worse) if they are open with their magick.

 

Honestly, I've started talking to my kids now about witchcraft (and only bits and pieces). Of course, I was also influenced heavily by family members, to let go of my own practices, thus it is possible that I've done it because *I* wanted to fit in as well.

 

But young kids are naive, and some kids can be very vicious. My kids are now 13 (next month), 9 (almost 10) and 6 (almost 7). I'm explaining little by little what I do. I haven't yet gone into explaining to my 2 little ones, regarding spirits. I have done so with my oldest.

 

The two youngest are in a Catholic school. My oldest is in public. They all used to be in public, however my middle child was having problems coping (and ironically I believe he's the most prone to Craft), now he fits in and he is accepted when he speaks of magic. The current school however, is very open. They also believe that Harry Potter is a GOOD influence on kids and that it helps with creativity and imagination ;).

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In all honesty here hun i wouldnt really worry think consider that question yet[ yet] till you are a mother and their actually here. Strange old thing motherhood. You- we dont know how we will be etc till in it literally. Emotion thought forms actions etc regarding our children can surprise your self at times, lol. In all sorts of ways. And how you will be, place within how you will have grown in say 5 years 10 years[ e.g] who knows def not even you[ any of us with ourselves] then theres the waiting period game of them going from babies toddlers to children thats few years. Then theres how that child, / children are as characters people you know, how headstrong sensitive fragile etc, how one could handle it. To show, practice even speak of these things could be minimal[ e.g] .your craft And alot depends on your path your ways, is it quiet, loud with many, on your own etc etc makes a huge difference impact. Things to consider.

And personally, just me hunny, each to there own i know in total respect, i wouldnt want to choose for them. Leave that open sacred personal for them their choice in to what religion, spiritual path if any at all to choose. As long as theres freedom energising the surroundings, they can never should never state,,,,,,,, you made me bla bla you were tooooooo bla bla you suffucated me bla bla,,,,,,,, just like any path like christianity being prime one amongst others.

I would wait then ponder decide when your a mother and their older hun. Just my humble opinion, chat sooooooooooooooooooooooon xxx :D

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Hello,

I have three kids. Two teens, and one toddler. I never taught my kids to keep it a secret. Yet they just instinctivley knew it was not cool to talk about it to other kids. They could tell mommy did things way differently from the other families. ;) I have never pushed them into my beliefs and practices. They were raised knowing and understanding it. If they wanted to participate in anything or watch and learn, that was fine. If not, that was fine too. My two older ones have been to wiccan circles and pagan festivals and one child enjoys them, the other doesn't. Once she said she didn't want to go, I told her that was okay and found her a sitter when I would go. I taught them that it will be for them to decide when they are older. I do give them spiritual guidence becuase I do feel that is important. But I try not to push them into any particular faith. They will know when it is right for them. I am glad you brought this up. It is a difficult thing to raise children with witchcraft in a dominantly christian world. We walk a fine line sometimes and hope it doesn't break.

Rebie

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Ok I live in a very small village full of devout Catholics but I don't pressure my kids to learn about witchcraft nor Christianity. The people think my kids dont have a religion but they dont get bashed for it. I tell people we lean more towards the esotertic lifestyle and have Old Testament beliefs.

 

In saying that although I have told the school my boys don't have to learn religion, I do think it is important for children to make up their own minds. Buy books on different religions, including Bible stories. My kids understand about Jesus and the stories but they also learn about healing, protection and crystals.

 

If they want to learn about Hinduism or Judism, then Ill back them fully. Just give your kids a wider choice of beliefs and tell people that you are open minded and your kids can make their own decision of what feels right to them when they are older. You dont need to feel pressured into fitting into society, as long as you have an explanation of why you don't want to fit in, that is usually enough to shut them up and stop the gossip and bullying.

 

My boys are fine - considering they are the only two kids in the whole area and school "without" any religion, the other kids understand that my boys have other beliefs.

 

I had to address spiritis with my boys (8 and 6) because the youngest has seen spirits from birth. The eldest not so often, but I had a bit of a problem with one and he had to be involved in helping me get rid of it... which he did.

 

However, I certainly don't encourage my boys to communicate with the spirit world at this age but I do encourage them not to be scared of the unknown.

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I have one child - 17 year old son. His dad is Jewish. He has been taken to temple, church, "pagan" things, a buddist temple, lectures on spirituality...etc. He tends to lean towards Christianity, but a very open-minded one.. he says he thinks he believes in God, but is not sure. I bought him a bible to read. He went to church for 3 weeks and got tired of it. (Yes I sat in there with him and he poked me in the ribs all through the sermon teasing me that we would get struck by lightening on the way out!) Anyway, I don't care what he believes as long as he believes insomething that gives him a sense of peace.

My house is littered with witchcraft books since I started looking into this path shortly after he was born. Any moms or kids who came into my house couldn't miss my interest unless they were blind or illiterate. No one ever gave him or me a hard time about it. They thought I was "quirky" and funny, but they never harassed Michael that I know of.

Michael is still trying to find himself and establish his independance as "different" from who his mum and dad are. He believes in karma, and I'm glad he does. I think it important to believe in something (especially as a teenager) that gives you a sense of right and wrong. He's just getting out of that rebelling against your parents stage (THANK GOD) but is still having hugh rows (fights) with his dad (who's a very controlling sod).

But the long and the short of it is that my being a witch has not had a detrimental effect on his life or friendships. And maybe it's made him just a little more open-minded and thoughtful... he still brings me home shells, feathers, and sticks he finds and is starting to look for deeper meanings to things besides what is in front of his eyes. I have never hidden who I am (witch-wise) and I would never encourage him to be someone he's not. Interestingly enough, when I finally came out of my "other" closet to him, he was the one who put me in my place and said I should be true to who I am and not worry so much about what he, family, friends and/or co-workers might think. He was right.

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Guest Red Witch

Often children will choose for themselves- it goes back to the idea that you just are Witch- so if they are going to be that way they just will get there eventually regardless of what you do or don't do. My daughter is a proper little witch, no doubt at all, she creates her own workings and is very active in her learning. I've never 'pushed' it on her, she found her way to it herself- and she's still only 11! So now she can ask me and I can help her if I feel it appropriate. I never hid any of my witch bits, I've always been open about it to a certain extent in the home. Those that are destined to will find the way. By the same token, my son (13) went through a Christian phase (Baptists of all things!!) and is now not sure what he believes. He has no witch leanings that I can see but is without prejudice. You can't ask for much more!

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I had to address the same issues with my kids. I too am a great believer in allowing my kids to find their own path. The problem is that if you fail to teach them anything how will they choose?

 

In the end I just did what I did and never hid it from them. At the same time I took them to various pagan festivals just so they could play with kids with similar beliefs. I also taught them about the Christian faith when they asked.

 

I was lucky in that at the primary school they attended, the library had childrens books about many different faiths. We just steadily went through them all.

 

Now, my eldest son (23), who has had prophetic dreams since he was a child and still gets them, has his own path, which is I guess none of the above, but at the same time a little bit of all of them.

 

My daughter is very much MY daughter. At the moment though she is 18 and going through that typical teenage girl stage. A rule unto herself.

 

My youngest son (16) hasn't yet settled on a path.

 

All we can do for our kids, is the best we know how to do. I think as long as we teach them to be decent human beings, we have done well.

 

StarChilde

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Well, I don't have any kids yet, but I can tell you what my mom did. She let her kids choose their own path. I happened to find the most sense and direction in following her path, but for example, my younger brother shows no inclination for (actually, almost no knowledge of) this path. However, my youngest brother took a middle ground by never in a million years calling himself a witch but instinctively following nature-based beliefs anyway.

 

I think it's especially easy for kids now to pick up a book on anything from Buddhism to Wicca and take lessons on belief according to their own preferences.

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Greetings All

 

This is one that resonates strongly with me.

 

I was something of a celeb round these parts years ago so oce we had kids there were all sorts of "What will you teach them?" questions raised. Many seemed nonplussed when I replied "A B C, walking and playing - what use has a child for that sort of BS? As a parent that is your responsability!"

 

I thought then, as I do now that children require no teaching and training and that to do so is of dubious morality.

 

A parent who is doing their job will do for the child all that is needful - from wiping asses through to "clearing their paths".

 

One of the best things is of course to keep them well aside from magical workings but at the same time be on hand to explain that which they WILL encounter and want explanations for. Most certainly it can fall into the same category as the "sex talk".

 

I use the analogy advisedly. For some the day will be late in the life and for others it will be early and responded to with the words: "Well DUH dad!" Like many aspects of witchcraft there is no manual, no set names, titles, grades or terms - there is simply the operator and how well they can cope with the vastness of their experiences through life. With time they come to not need such things so stringently but to begin with they should be warded and assited as their nature requires by their elders. To my mind that is a good and simple frame of reference.

 

A good example of this was some days ago when we heard a chase going through the scrub behind our house. Was it the Wild Chase ... I say no because the people who use the terms most often mean this or that at this or that time laden with their own meanings and blah blah blah. I explained it simply as "Big bad things going by, noted us peering over the hedge and said: "Well hell-lo ... haven't see you guys in years!"

 

We could try to define it and give it names and times and so on but why bother? We slept sound without such things and that is the secret. Experience is like survival - it is the ability to swim in strange waters!

 

So ..... with reference to kids ... well if you live near a creek you teach them to swim young ... if you live in a desert then it is clearly not something they need worry too much about - more time spent leaning to walk without rhythm would be better! LOL

 

Fraternally

 

Scott

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Even though my son's only 4, this is already an issue for me. My mother, with whom he spends a great deal of time, is Jehovah's Witness. And she started in on it as soon as he was born. She's still not willing to accept I'm not a Witness (much less a witch), so she's trying to convert my little guy early.

 

I've begged, pleaded, and threatened her in regards to this. Stop shoving your cult down my son's throat. When he's old enough to decide where his path lies, he will. If it's Witness (please gods no), then so be it. But I told her that, until that day, I wanted him raised to be respectful of all beliefs, whether or not he agreed with them. And I've basically told her that if she can't respect my wishes, she wouldn't be seeing much of him anymore. Seems to have stuck, for now.

 

I'm not teaching him anything about what I do, per se. It's more of a respect for nature and spirits and such. When he starts spewing Witnessy stuff, I just look at him and tell him that's just one version, and that gramma's not always right.

 

That's my two cents,

Amy

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You're a better woman than me. I know we've had discussions in the past about this and I seem to recall that for some reason she's got to be a part of his life... but honestly, the thought of someone shoving garbage down my child's throat and tainting them spiritually, ESPECIALLY with that particular fucked-up religion, would be enough to make me go psycho.

 

:mad:

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When my daughter was in primary school, she had a friend there who's family was JW (still are I would guess). She used to try and convert me daily in the car park, I would just nod and let it slide. When the kids started wanting to play outside of school she allowed my daughter to visit her place but was kind of against her son visiting mine. That was fine, but when I found out she was trying to 'convert' my daughter who was about 8 at the time, instead of getting into a huge arguement over it, I simply said: "I tell you what, if you agree to stop trying to convert my daughter, I'll agree not to bring my Tarot cards into your house"

 

Believe it or not, things became much better after that!

 

StarChilde

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Greetings BD

Lol Scott, or should I say Muad D'ib?

 

Hey now I didn't even come CLOSE to pointing out my preference for a mixed approach between the Gesserit and Mentat approaches as the most applicable as far as raising children that will make up the basis of well stabilised future societies ....

 

oh shit I said that out loud didn't I? Oh well cats out of the bag! LOL

 

I *do* I will admit have a copy of "the collected sayings" on the same shelf as my copy of the Sagas, the Colbrens and so on .... wisdom is where you find it! *BG*

 

Fraternally

 

Scott

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Sorry for the off topic post!

 

Have to totally agree Scott, wisdom is where you find it, and some of the books like Frank Herberts 'Dune', Bernard Cornwell's 'Warlord Chronicles' and Manda Scott's 'Boudicca' series do have much within that can be gleamed by those looking with a different viewpoint, much like some of the celtic mythology and norse sagas!

 

Back on topic now!

 

My Daughter is aware of my path, and is also aware that its a private thing that we dont wish all and sundry to know about, so she keeps quiet about it, but our main focus is always on letting her find her own way, allowing her the choice to decide what she believes for herself. If she has questions, then we answer them in a non judgemental way, not only about our own paths, but also about any other religion or tradition that she has an interest in, our hopes being that she will get a good grounding and come out as a well rounded individual without prejudices and able to make her own decisions. Afterall, we cannot live our childrens lives for them, only attempt to allow them to grow into their own self and make their own mistakes and triumphs! (And be there to pick them back up, dust them off and then celebrate or commiserate as needed! lol!)

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My father bought my family up in a very strict catholic household, my brothers and sisters and I ( five of us all together) were taught that there was only one religion one way...catholicism. However, even though to most my mother adopted the good catholic wife masquerade, she wasnt...and thankfully she taught us the valuable lesson ( at least to my sisters and myself) that we cannot judge any religion and say its "the only one" because until we die, we can never know. She taught us things on the sly, like about the occult, her family history ( my welsh fae-like great grandmother), and Karma etc. but it opened our eyes enough to see there was more to spirituality than just one religion.

 

Thanks to her gentle quiet unobtrusive teachings, none of my brothers or sisters are Catholic ( Although to this day my father thinks my brothers and sisters are good catholic boys and girls - he believes however that iam a satanist which makes me laugh so much :D)

My two sisters practice traditional witchcraft, one brother is an atheist and the other is too young ( only 13) to really decide his own path.

 

i believe that children pick up more than a lot of people give them credit for, and being open about what you do helps :) they will find their path but teaching them to be open to all thoughts and ideas is the best gift to give them. Without prejudice, they will find themselves and their path and understand why others take the path they choose as well :p

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Guest Kathrina

My daughter is only 16 months old. I can already see her personality shining through. She is a very smart, sensitive, and happy young lady.

 

This world can be very overwhelming for the little ones, so I will help her in any way that I can with her beliefs, career, etc. I'll give her books that she can read and answer all of her questions.

 

I will be sending her to a private school, but it won't be of any religion. I have also discussed with my husband about home schooling as well. I would prefer that she not worry about religion or being taught just one at such a young age. She will eventually make a decision for herself and my husband agrees with me on this.

 

So, right now and for a while, her and I are going to concentrate on playing, learning our abc's and 123's, and just being a kid.

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When my daughter was in primary school, she had a friend there who's family was JW (still are I would guess). She used to try and convert me daily in the car park, I would just nod and let it slide. When the kids started wanting to play outside of school she allowed my daughter to visit her place but was kind of against her son visiting mine. That was fine, but when I found out she was trying to 'convert' my daughter who was about 8 at the time, instead of getting into a huge arguement over it, I simply said: "I tell you what, if you agree to stop trying to convert my daughter, I'll agree not to bring my Tarot cards into your house"

 

Believe it or not, things became much better after that!

 

StarChilde

 

Wow, you are a lot more understanding and tolerant than I. If I found out someone was trying to convert my child, he/she just wouldn't ever go back to their home.

Rebie

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I've saud it before and i'll say it again kids are to interested in fashion, TV, toys and the opposite sex to be bothered with religion :D.

My lot are raised with an open pagan view of life than an absolute religion.

Witchcraft, to me, is not a religion as such but the children are well aware of their own 'talents'.

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I know that I'm overstepping my bounds here (having no children and all), but this is just my opinion, so take it for what it's worth. :)

 

I think children need to be raised according to their individual strengths. Some children are strong willed brats (like me), others are very loving and nurturing, or extroverted and adventerous. Whatever strengths your child has, nurture that. Encourage your child to be themselves, to be individuals, not to be swayed by their peers or popular opinion.

 

I grew up before the time of computers and video games, so I spent most of my free time outside exploring the countryside and climbing trees. That had a big impact on my worldview. My bonds with Nature were formed during those early years. I would greet my favorite trees like old friends, talk to the moon, and dance with the wind. Childhood is such a magical time that many children are being deprived of by sitting in front of the idiot box. I think it's important to get the kids out of the house, and let them experience the all the wonder and magic of Nature.

 

I think it's also very important to lead by example. Kids really do watch their parents, how they act, what they say (or don't say), and what they believe. You don't have to sit your kids down and give them formal witchcraft lessons if they can already see and understand how it's a part of your life. If you just practice your faith, and answer any questions they have along the way, you'll teach them more than you know.

 

And finally, just accept that witchcraft isn't for everyone. You can't force your kids to practice if it's not for them. Let them be themselves, and if that means they find happiness on a different path, then be happy for them. Anyway, that's how I would raise my children. :)

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In my opinion, raising your child to be intelligent and open minded is the best thing you can do for them. Teaching them their basic elementary skills and encouraging them to read is tantamount. Teaching them ethics is up to the parents. They will NEVER get it in the schools. And, strangely, survival skills(in the wild), basic herbalism, and some form of physical self protection in this world will do them good.

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Just beware that they can turn on you !!! LOL My loving, youngest child just got me with a laser pen that also has a buzzer in it. He asked me to unstick a button on the pen, and being totally engrossed in posting here, took the pen and with my thumb tried to pop the button up. Boy did I get a shock!!! Monster!!! Gotta love them for who they are.

 

Give them lots of love, good values and a little kick in the bottom once in awhile and they will find the path that they were chosen for.

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